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Re: BASYS/1 - what a wonderful thing!

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  • jdrose_8_bit
    Overall, I think the 2011 frenzy for legacy microcomputers is beginning to abate a little. It seems like the prices are starting to soften a bit. At least at
    Message 1 of 24 , May 12, 2013
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      Overall, I think the 2011 frenzy for legacy microcomputers is beginning to abate a little. It seems like the prices are starting to soften a bit. At least at eBay.



      --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Raymond Siminas <lb_tiger39208@...> wrote:
      >
      > If ou think that's bad, look at what an apple 1 sells for.  I know, it's off-topic.
      >
      >  
      >
      > --- On Fri, 5/10/13, David W. Schultz <david.schultz@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: David W. Schultz <david.schultz@...>
      > Subject: Re: [cosmacelf] BASYS/1 - what a wonderful thing!
      > To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Friday, May 10, 2013, 4:17 PM
      >
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      > On 05/10/2013 11:24 AM, Raymond Siminas wrote:
      >
      > >
      >
      > >
      >
      > > Myself, I'd love to have a BASYS board or two. It looks to be very
      >
      > > capable, especially considering the technology back then!
      >
      > >
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      > >
      >
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      >
      > I purchased three RCA CDP18S604B microboards a while back from All
      >
      > Electronics that have similar capabilities and are from the same
      >
      > era. (The documentation has a 1981 date on it.)
      >
      >
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      > 1K, 2K, or 4K PROM (my boards came with three socket daughter cards
      >
      > installed in this position for even more)
      >
      > 1KB SRAM
      >
      > 1 parallel input and one output port (1852 based)
      >
      > programmable timer
      >
      > small user area with pad per hole
      >
      > 44 pin expansion bus
      >
      >
      >
      > I just checked Ebay and some nut wants almost a kilobuck for one!
      >
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      > http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rca-CDP18S604B-RCA-Microboard-/370444951408?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item56403d5f70
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      >
      > David W. Schultz
      >
      > http://home.earthlink.net/~david.schultz
      >
      > Returned for Regrooving
      >
    • jdrose_8_bit
      http://news.cnet.com/2300-17938_105-10016780-4.html
      Message 2 of 24 , May 13, 2013
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        http://news.cnet.com/2300-17938_105-10016780-4.html

        --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "jdrose_8_bit" <rarecoinbuyer@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Raymond Siminas wrote:
        > >
        > > If you think that's bad, look at what an Apple 1 sells for. I know, it's off-topic.
        > >
        >
        > It is a really good point nonetheless.
        >
        > Jupiter Ace computers selling for $1200. Altair computers for $3000.
        >
        > An early 1802 SBC for $999 seems like a bargain.
        >
      • thinkpast
        About buying a BASYS card in 1982: $129 in 1982 dollars would be over $300 today by most inflation estimators. It was a lot of money to spend at the time. A
        Message 3 of 24 , May 15, 2013
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          About buying a BASYS card in 1982: $129 in 1982 dollars would be over
          $300 today by most inflation estimators. It was a lot of money to spend at the time. A cruddy but runnable used car might cost that much. Apple II's then sold retail for over a thousand dollars. As what we'd now call an "embedded computer", the BASYS was comparable to other single-board non-floppy-based computers of the time, and cheaper than most. Plus it had the low-power noise-tolerance advantages we know COSMACs have.

          Discussions about "auction" values for an original BASYS card, are in my opinion pure speculation, and are distracted by mentioning the VERY few thousand-dollar vintage microcomputers.

          I put the BASYS card and manual on the Membership Card Web pages,
          because it was predecessor history to the M/S Card. 8th and the IDIOT
          monitor were BASYS products. It's also a classic 1970's microcomputer manual. But I also put it there, because it contains how-to information for interfacing the 1802 to various devices. Please note: much of that information STILL APPLIES to the Membership Card. The I/O is little different. Lee and I have talked about rewriting BASYS app notes as specific M/S card interface notes.

          There's merits in reproducing the BASYS card, it's more expandable and
          has more features than the current M/S card. It would cost more than the M/S Card set. All that is up to Lee Hart. But most any one thing the BASYS card did, could be replicated with the 1802 Membership Card, by building the interface hardware, and adding ROM to the RAM.

          Herb Johnson
          retrotechnology.com
        • bill rowe
          ah, I dunno herb. I think the basys was better than you re giving it credit for. It certainly does look more embeddable and ready to go than I would have
          Message 4 of 24 , May 15, 2013
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            ah, I dunno herb.  I think the basys was better than you're giving it credit for.  It certainly does look more embeddable and ready to go than I would have imagined.  You could never have shoved a netronics elf under the couch to run a thermostat but the basys could have done it.  I confess to not knowing much about other single board systems of the time so there may have been many but I still think the Basys was pretty sweet.  I look at the prototyping area and the multiplex i/o and think wow, you could have done some serious arduino style blinkenlights with that.

            The manual is really excellent and there I do have points of comparison with kits of the day.

            So, I may be too easily impressed but I remain impressed.


            To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
            From: hjohnson@...
            Date: Wed, 15 May 2013 19:21:23 +0000
            Subject: [cosmacelf] Re: BASYS/1 - what a wonderful thing!

             
            About buying a BASYS card in 1982: $129 in 1982 dollars would be over
            $300 today by most inflation estimators. It was a lot of money to spend at the time. A cruddy but runnable used car might cost that much. Apple II's then sold retail for over a thousand dollars. As what we'd now call an "embedded computer", the BASYS was comparable to other single-board non-floppy-based computers of the time, and cheaper than most. Plus it had the low-power noise-tolerance advantages we know COSMACs have.

            Discussions about "auction" values for an original BASYS card, are in my opinion pure speculation, and are distracted by mentioning the VERY few thousand-dollar vintage microcomputers.

            I put the BASYS card and manual on the Membership Card Web pages,
            because it was predecessor history to the M/S Card. 8th and the IDIOT
            monitor were BASYS products. It's also a classic 1970's microcomputer manual. But I also put it there, because it contains how-to information for interfacing the 1802 to various devices. Please note: much of that information STILL APPLIES to the Membership Card. The I/O is little different. Lee and I have talked about rewriting BASYS app notes as specific M/S card interface notes.

            There's merits in reproducing the BASYS card, it's more expandable and
            has more features than the current M/S card. It would cost more than the M/S Card set. All that is up to Lee Hart. But most any one thing the BASYS card did, could be replicated with the 1802 Membership Card, by building the interface hardware, and adding ROM to the RAM.

            Herb Johnson
            retrotechnology.com


          • jdrose_8_bit
            Here is a nice quick overview of Forth: http://electronicdesign.com/boards/forth-still-suits-embedded-applications
            Message 5 of 24 , Jun 22, 2013
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              Here is a nice quick overview of Forth:

              http://electronicdesign.com/boards/forth-still-suits-embedded-applications


              >
              > FORTH was also unique at the time in providing a common development
              > platform for many different CPUs. We do this today with C, but it was a
              > new concept back then. PolyFORTH could "target compile" the same program
              > for several different CPUs.
              >
              > Somewhere around here I still have those ancient 8" floppies with the
              > FORTH Inc. system on them. Unfortunately, the development system that
              > ran those disks is long gone.
              >
              >
            • Rick Cortese
              and here is a way to make it palatable to most of the human race. http://home.claranet.nl/users/mhx/basic.frt ________________________________ From:
              Message 6 of 24 , Jun 22, 2013
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                and here is a way to make it palatable to most of the human race.*;) winking


                From: jdrose_8_bit <rarecoinbuyer@...>
                To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Saturday, June 22, 2013 10:39 AM
                Subject: [cosmacelf] Re: Forth - what a wonderful thing!

                 
                Here is a nice quick overview of Forth:

                http://electronicdesign.com/boards/forth-still-suits-embedded-applications

                >
                > FORTH was also unique at the time in providing a common development
                > platform for many different CPUs. We do this today with C, but it was a
                > new concept back then. PolyFORTH could "target compile" the same program
                > for several different CPUs.
                >
                > Somewhere around here I still have those ancient 8" floppies with the
                > FORTH Inc. system on them. Unfortunately, the development system that
                > ran those disks is long gone.
                >
                >



              • Lee Hart
                ... Fascinating! It s a pretty complete BASIC, too. -- There are few industries with more BS than the battery industry. Elon Musk -- Lee A. Hart,
                Message 7 of 24 , Jun 22, 2013
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                  Rick Cortese wrote:
                  > and here is a way to make it palatable to most of the human race.*;) winking
                  > http://home.claranet.nl/users/mhx/basic.frt

                  Fascinating! It's a pretty complete BASIC, too.

                  --
                  There are few industries with more BS than the battery industry.
                  Elon Musk
                  --
                  Lee A. Hart, http://www.sunrise-ev.com/LeesEVs.htm
                • Dana Myers
                  Love it! For modern CPUs and tools, Forth is an answer to a question that no one is asking. For the classic 1802, it s right in there, though. BASIC done on
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jun 22, 2013
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                    Love it! For modern CPUs and tools, Forth is an answer to a question that
                    no one is asking.

                    For the classic 1802, it's right in there, though.

                    BASIC done on top of Forth - now that's winning.

                    Dana K6JQ


                    On 6/22/2013 12:40 PM, Rick Cortese wrote:
                     
                    and here is a way to make it palatable to most of the human race.*;) winking


                    From: jdrose_8_bit <rarecoinbuyer@...>
                    To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Saturday, June 22, 2013 10:39 AM
                    Subject: [cosmacelf] Re: Forth - what a wonderful thing!
                  • jdrose_8_bit
                    ... Epic!
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jun 26, 2013
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                      --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Rick Cortese <ricortes@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > and here is a way to make it palatable to most of the human race.
                      > http://home.claranet.nl/users/mhx/basic.frt
                      >

                      Epic!
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