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Book Review: Programmer's Guide to the 1802

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  • William Donnelly
    I did a quick-read of my Programmer s Guide to the 1802 (with an Assembler for Your Machine) by Tom Swan. 156+ pages. (Preface, etc.) Published 1981 by
    Message 1 of 18 , May 1, 2013
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      I did a quick-read of my "Programmer's Guide to the 1802
      (with an Assembler for Your Machine)" by Tom Swan.
      156+ pages. (Preface, etc.) Published 1981 by Hayden Book Co.
      First edition. (was it ever re-printed after first-run? probably not)

      The book is a nice introduction to programming for beginning programmers
      with a specific, extended focus on and for beginning 1802 programmers.
      That is pretty much the extent of the book. Though it is fairly complete in
      what it covers, and is more than adequate for the beginner, and possibly
      beginning intermediate, 1802 programmer.

      The author used a "4k Cosmac VIP" for programming. There are a few B&W photos,
      of the VIP and what I assume is its internal board, and several graphics.

      The main section/chapter "Fundamentals of Assembly Language" would be better
      titled "Fundamentals of Machine Language" imo. Although there are those who use
      the two terms interchangeably. I am of the opinion that Assembly Language specifically
      uses a fairly complete Assembler to program, using a source code file, and a resulting
      assembled program and/or object file that needs a linker to create the final program,
      and Machine Language deals more with "low-level" opcode and mnemonic instructions
      and such. The chapter is fairly complete, with specific focus on the 1802 instruction set
      and microprocessor functionality. (DMA, etc.) There are occasional references to the
      1861 video display chip here and there.

      The 1802 instruction set is covered for each instruction. Most of this looks like
      it was taken from the MPM-201x CDP1802 Users Manual, including timing diagrams,
      internal architecture, etc. There may be additional commentary beyond that of the
      manual in some of the instructions covered.

      The simple "assembler" is actually PART of a Monitor, that only performs "assembly"
      of the single line user input of a single opcode and disassembly of the resulting code.
      (for 'user verification') Therefore the admitted minimal operation of "does not support
      the use of labels, macros, or mathematical expressions". (mostly because it's not really
      a true/full "Assembler") It is written in 1802 code, so there is something, or much, to be
      learned by studying that code. There is only an "assembly-like" program listing, no hex dump for entry.

      The user stores up to 32 bytes of input into the input/output buffer, calls the
      ASMBLR routine, and it "assembles" the single line mnemonic into an opcode,
      stores the result in memory via register RA, and then calls its internal "Disassembler" (DISASM)
      routine to store the disassembled opcode into the I/O buffer. (this increments RA to the
      next location) If an error occurs, RA is not changed. "All possible errors are not recognized
      by ASMBLR, although most common ones will be caught." (for example, LDN R0 is accepted
      (00h) and disassembles into IDL)

      It is up to the user to provide the Input, Output and Control routines to use the Dis/Assembler.
      The author mentions the "operating system", so he must / might be referring to
      something the Cosmac VIP had already with its ROM 'monitor' or whatever it had. (?)
      There is very little information about the VIP. (effectively none)

      To perform something more like a real Assembler would act would require the user
      to load the source text of the code line by line and send it to the ASMBLR routine,
      possibly using the returned output to create a 'list file'. The DISASM routine may be
      called separately for something akin to a monitor 'list' command, but in a loop,
      once for each instruction.

      There is "A Mini Library" of several routines included as the last chapter.
      These are usable, and somewhat educational (for study/learning), as well.

      The intermediate or advanced programmer, especially 1802 programmer,
      needs a more advanced book. (that, afaik, is not available) I would have to think
      about what an "advanced book" might have that is not in this book.

      Maybe this is all that is really needed for the 1802, and if you are past the beginner
      programmer level, then there is little more to offer. Perhaps some advanced programming
      'tricks', a good in-depth explanation of the 1861 programming and usage, some more,
      more-advanced "library" routines so you don't have to reinvent the wheel, explanation
      of the use of a good, actual Assembler (included?), an in-depth explanation of CHIP-8
      and how to write programs with it, possibly something like the CDP1802 manuals contain,
      some of the code and concepts of which are more complex and extended than what is
      included in this book. (I think)

      And, since the 1802 is a "hobbyist" microprocessor, more information on interfacing
      circuits to it, using its I/O, and DMA, etc., or even building a computer with it,  although
      that might be a book unto itself. (Lee Hart already did most of that with the Membership Card
      manual, and similarly the Elf2K manual)

      But the market for anything like this/these is so vertical, that it would have to be done for
      the love of the hobby, possibly "props" / 'community notoriety', etc. Part of the 'problem'
      is that many/most 1802 microcomputers have very limited user and data interfaces, except
      for the Elf2K, and possibly a few others. So the 'toy' aspect kind of gets in the way.

      It's been quite awhile since I've looked at or read a microprocessor or microcontroller
      programming book, especially one that is for "advanced programmers". I suppose if I
      looked at one of those it would remind me, inspire me, give me ideas, and point me in
      the direction of what could be done similarly for the 1802 in that respect.

      Anyway, as I mentioned elsewhere, I recently paid $50 for my copy of this book.
      It's an ex-library copy in pretty good shape. Is that even "legal"? Probably only if the
      library sold it, which they do sometimes do. Hopefully people aren't stealing these from
      libraries and selling them because they are so high-priced now. All references to whatever
      library it was have been 'destroyed'. So I guess I'm probably not going to gaol for
      'receiving stolen property', or anything like that. The $50 price tag was worth it for
      the collectability aspects. It will most-likely only be sold when I die. And I could go at
      any time, so people might want to get on my waiting list. ;o) (or you could take a chance
      that you're in my will -- you probably shouldn't get your hopes up, though)

      – Bill

    • tomswan1802
      Thanks for the detailed review of my book. You are correct that my assembler is not a full-blown product, but more of a translator that I wrote for my own use
      Message 2 of 18 , May 1, 2013
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        Thanks for the detailed review of my book. You are correct that my assembler is not a full-blown product, but more of a translator that I wrote for my own use (long before I wrote the book) after growing tired of hand encoding machine code instructions. It works, but my Cosmac VIP being cramped for memory, it has zero frills! PS: I'm going to create a pdf of the book and offer it on my web site soon. -- ts

        --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, William Donnelly <william@...> wrote:
        >
        > I did a quick-read of my "Programmer's Guide to the 1802
        > (with an Assembler for Your Machine)" by Tom Swan.
        > 156+ pages. (Preface, etc.) Published 1981 by Hayden Book Co.
        > First edition. (was it ever re-printed after first-run? probably not)
        >
        > The book is a nice introduction to programming for beginning programmers
        > with a specific, extended focus on and for beginning 1802 programmers.
        > That is pretty much the extent of the book. Though it is fairly complete in
        > what it covers, and is more than adequate for the beginner, and possibly
        > beginning intermediate, 1802 programmer.
        >
        > The author used a "4k Cosmac VIP" for programming. There are a few B&W
        > photos,
        > of the VIP and what I assume is its internal board, and several graphics.
        >
        > The main section/chapter "Fundamentals of Assembly Language" would be better
        > titled "Fundamentals of Machine Language" imo. Although there are those
        > who use
        > the two terms interchangeably. I am of the opinion that Assembly
        > Language specifically
        > uses a fairly complete Assembler to program, using a source code file,
        > and a resulting
        > assembled program and/or object file that needs a linker to create the
        > final program,
        > and Machine Language deals more with "low-level" opcode and mnemonic
        > instructions
        > and such. The chapter is fairly complete, with specific focus on the
        > 1802 instruction set
        > and microprocessor functionality. (DMA, etc.) There are occasional
        > references to the
        > 1861 video display chip here and there.
        >
        > The 1802 instruction set is covered for each instruction. Most of this
        > looks like
        > it was taken from the MPM-201x CDP1802 Users Manual, including timing
        > diagrams,
        > internal architecture, etc. There may be additional commentary beyond
        > that of the
        > manual in some of the instructions covered.
        >
        > The simple "assembler" is actually PART of a Monitor, that only performs
        > "assembly"
        > of the single line user input of a single opcode and disassembly of the
        > resulting code.
        > (for 'user verification') Therefore the admitted minimal operation of
        > "does not support
        > the use of labels, macros, or mathematical expressions". (mostly because
        > it's not really
        > a true/full "Assembler") It is written in 1802 code, so there is
        > something, or much, to be
        > learned by studying that code. There is only an "assembly-like" program
        > listing, no hex dump for entry.
        >
        > The user stores up to 32 bytes of input into the input/output buffer,
        > calls the
        > ASMBLR routine, and it "assembles" the single line mnemonic into an opcode,
        > stores the result in memory via register RA, and then calls its internal
        > "Disassembler" (DISASM)
        > routine to store the disassembled opcode into the I/O buffer. (this
        > increments RA to the
        > next location) If an error occurs, RA is not changed. "All possible
        > errors are not recognized
        > by ASMBLR, although most common ones will be caught." (for example, LDN
        > R0 is accepted
        > (00h) and disassembles into IDL)
        >
        > It is up to the user to provide the Input, Output and Control routines
        > to use the Dis/Assembler.
        > The author mentions the "operating system", so he must / might be
        > referring to
        > something the Cosmac VIP had already with its ROM 'monitor' or whatever
        > it had. (?)
        > There is very little information about the VIP. (effectively none)
        >
        > To perform something more like a real Assembler would act would require
        > the user
        > to load the source text of the code line by line and send it to the
        > ASMBLR routine,
        > possibly using the returned output to create a 'list file'. The DISASM
        > routine may be
        > called separately for something akin to a monitor 'list' command, but in
        > a loop,
        > once for each instruction.
        >
        > There is "A Mini Library" of several routines included as the last chapter.
        > These are usable, and somewhat educational (for study/learning), as well.
        >
        > The intermediate or advanced programmer, especially 1802 programmer,
        > needs a more advanced book. (that, afaik, is not available) I would have
        > to think
        > about what an "advanced book" might have that is not in this book.
        >
        > Maybe this is all that is really needed for the 1802, and if you are
        > past the beginner
        > programmer level, then there is little more to offer. Perhaps some
        > advanced programming
        > 'tricks', a good in-depth explanation of the 1861 programming and usage,
        > some more,
        > more-advanced "library" routines so you don't have to reinvent the
        > wheel, explanation
        > of the use of a good, actual Assembler (included?), an in-depth
        > explanation of CHIP-8
        > and how to write programs with it, possibly something like the CDP1802
        > manuals contain,
        > some of the code and concepts of which are more complex and extended
        > than what is
        > included in this book. (I think)
        >
        > And, since the 1802 is a "hobbyist" microprocessor, more information on
        > interfacing
        > circuits to it, using its I/O, and DMA, etc., or even building a
        > computer with it, although
        > that might be a book unto itself. (Lee Hart already did most of that
        > with the Membership Card
        > manual, and similarly the Elf2K manual)
        >
        > But the market for anything like this/these is so vertical, that it
        > would have to be done for
        > the love of the hobby, possibly "props" / 'community notoriety', etc.
        > Part of the 'problem'
        > is that many/most 1802 microcomputers have very limited user and data
        > interfaces, except
        > for the Elf2K, and possibly a few others. So the 'toy' aspect kind of
        > gets in the way.
        >
        > It's been quite awhile since I've looked at or read a microprocessor or
        > microcontroller
        > programming book, especially one that is for "advanced programmers". I
        > suppose if I
        > looked at one of those it would remind me, inspire me, give me ideas,
        > and point me in
        > the direction of what could be done similarly for the 1802 in that respect.
        >
        > Anyway, as I mentioned elsewhere, I recently paid $50 for my copy of
        > this book.
        > It's an ex-library copy in pretty good shape. Is that even "legal"?
        > Probably only if the
        > library sold it, which they do sometimes do. Hopefully people aren't
        > stealing these from
        > libraries and selling them because they are so high-priced now. All
        > references to whatever
        > library it was have been 'destroyed'. So I guess I'm probably not going
        > to gaol for
        > 'receiving stolen property', or anything like that. The $50 price tag
        > was worth it for
        > the collectability aspects. It will most-likely only be sold when I die.
        > And I could go at
        > any time, so people might want to get on my waiting list. ;o) (or you
        > could take a chance
        > that you're in my will -- you probably shouldn't get your hopes up, though)
        >
        > -- Bill
        >
      • jdrose_8_bit
        Mr. Swan, Fantastic! Looking forward to it.
        Message 3 of 18 , May 1, 2013
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          Mr. Swan,

          Fantastic! Looking forward to it.

          --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "tomswan1802" <tom@...> wrote:
          >
          > I'm going to create a pdf of the book and offer it on my web site soon. -- ts
          >
        • joshbensadon
          ... Very nice! ... Does it teach Assembler mnemonics or Machine codes? ... To fit even a simple assembler/disassembler into a 4K VIP is still miles
          Message 4 of 18 , May 1, 2013
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            --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, William Donnelly <william@...> wrote:
            >
            > I did a quick-read of my "Programmer's Guide to the 1802

            Very nice!

            > The main section/chapter "Fundamentals of Assembly Language" would be better
            > titled "Fundamentals of Machine Language" imo.

            Does it teach Assembler mnemonics or Machine codes?

            > The simple "assembler" is actually PART of a Monitor, that only performs
            > "assembly"

            To fit even a simple assembler/disassembler into a 4K VIP is still miles (kilometers) ahead of anything I did with my ELF in 1980.


            > The author mentions the "operating system", so he must / might be
            > referring to
            > something the Cosmac VIP had already with its ROM 'monitor' or whatever
            > it had. (?)
            > There is very little information about the VIP. (effectively none)

            Yes, the VIP ROM has a monitor and display routines for the 1861. The CHIP-8, actually calls some of the display routines in VIP ROM. Lee Hart disassembled the VIP ROM, then as an exercise, I walked through the code and added more comments. I think you can find it in the files section.


            > The intermediate or advanced programmer, especially 1802 programmer,
            > needs a more advanced book. (that, afaik, is not available) I would have
            > to think
            > about what an "advanced book" might have that is not in this book.

            I'm sure you could gather enough programming tricks (mostly from Lee) right from this forum to write a few chapters.

            > of the use of a good, actual Assembler (included?), an in-depth
            > explanation of CHIP-8

            Although I don't explain CHIP-8, I disassembled it with lots of comments. Should be in the files section.

            > and how to write programs with it, possibly something like the CDP1802

            Another great idea.

            > I recently paid $50 for my copy of
            > this book.
            > It will most-likely only be sold when I die.
            > And I could go at any time

            I'm sure plans are in the works to arrange an accident. Perhaps the brake lines in your car might get cut? You might not want to stand under a ladder either. Or, at your next restaurant meal, you better have someone else taste your food?


            :)J
          • Adam Trionfo
            Great summary of the book (maybe you could post this as a review on Amazon!). I did return my loan to the library a few weeks ago. I was glad that I got to
            Message 5 of 18 , May 2, 2013
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              Great summary of the book (maybe you could post this as a review on Amazon!).  I did return my loan to the library a few weeks ago.  I was glad that I got to take a look through it.  So, for one dollar I got to check it out.  For those that are looking for the book, this is a great way to see what's inside.
               
              As for having a stolen copy.  I HIGHLY doubt it.  The book is a very old technical book, and thus this is a book that would just go into the discard pile of most libraries (probably long ago).  The book was probably bought by someone for a buck or two at a library sale.  After that, it can be resold many times for whatever the buyer can get for it.  There's not much of a market for this book... but for those that like this sort of hobby material, it's a neat find.  Hopefully it becomes available in some form.  Even if only scanned and distributed with the author's permission.
               
              Adam
               

              To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
              From: william@...
              Date: Wed, 1 May 2013 03:43:25 -0700
              Subject: [cosmacelf] Book Review: Programmer's Guide to the 1802



              I did a quick-read of my "Programmer's Guide to the 1802
              (with an Assembler for Your Machine)" by Tom Swan.
              156+ pages. (Preface, etc.) Published 1981 by Hayden Book Co.
              First edition. (was it ever re-printed after first-run? probably not)

              The book is a nice introduction to programming for beginning programmers
              with a specific, extended focus on and for beginning 1802 programmers.
              That is pretty much the extent of the book. Though it is fairly complete in
              what it covers, and is more than adequate for the beginner, and possibly
              beginning intermediate, 1802 programmer.

              The author used a "4k Cosmac VIP" for programming. There are a few B&W photos,
              of the VIP and what I assume is its internal board, and several graphics.

              The main section/chapter "Fundamentals of Assembly Language" would be better
              titled "Fundamentals of Machine Language" imo. Although there are those who use
              the two terms interchangeably. I am of the opinion that Assembly Language specifically
              uses a fairly complete Assembler to program, using a source code file, and a resulting
              assembled program and/or object file that needs a linker to create the final program,
              and Machine Language deals more with "low-level" opcode and mnemonic instructions
              and such. The chapter is fairly complete, with specific focus on the 1802 instruction set
              and microprocessor functionality. (DMA, etc.) There are occasional references to the
              1861 video display chip here and there.

              The 1802 instruction set is covered for each instruction. Most of this looks like
              it was taken from the MPM-201x CDP1802 Users Manual, including timing diagrams,
              internal architecture, etc. There may be additional commentary beyond that of the
              manual in some of the instructions covered.

              The simple "assembler" is actually PART of a Monitor, that only performs "assembly"
              of the single line user input of a single opcode and disassembly of the resulting code.
              (for 'user verification') Therefore the admitted minimal operation of "does not support
              the use of labels, macros, or mathematical expressions". (mostly because it's not really
              a true/full "Assembler") It is written in 1802 code, so there is something, or much, to be
              learned by studying that code. There is only an "assembly-like" program listing, no hex dump for entry.

              The user stores up to 32 bytes of input into the input/output buffer, calls the
              ASMBLR routine, and it "assembles" the single line mnemonic into an opcode,
              stores the result in memory via register RA, and then calls its internal "Disassembler" (DISASM)
              routine to store the disassembled opcode into the I/O buffer. (this increments RA to the
              next location) If an error occurs, RA is not changed. "All possible errors are not recognized
              by ASMBLR, although most common ones will be caught." (for example, LDN R0 is accepted
              (00h) and disassembles into IDL)

              It is up to the user to provide the Input, Output and Control routines to use the Dis/Assembler.
              The author mentions the "operating system", so he must / might be referring to
              something the Cosmac VIP had already with its ROM 'monitor' or whatever it had. (?)
              There is very little information about the VIP. (effectively none)

              To perform something more like a real Assembler would act would require the user
              to load the source text of the code line by line and send it to the ASMBLR routine,
              possibly using the returned output to create a 'list file'. The DISASM routine may be
              called separately for something akin to a monitor 'list' command, but in a loop,
              once for each instruction.

              There is "A Mini Library" of several routines included as the last chapter.
              These are usable, and somewhat educational (for study/learning), as well.

              The intermediate or advanced programmer, especially 1802 programmer,
              needs a more advanced book. (that, afaik, is not available) I would have to think
              about what an "advanced book" might have that is not in this book.

              Maybe this is all that is really needed for the 1802, and if you are past the beginner
              programmer level, then there is little more to offer. Perhaps some advanced programming
              'tricks', a good in-depth explanation of the 1861 programming and usage, some more,
              more-advanced "library" routines so you don't have to reinvent the wheel, explanation
              of the use of a good, actual Assembler (included?), an in-depth explanation of CHIP-8
              and how to write programs with it, possibly something like the CDP1802 manuals contain,
              some of the code and concepts of which are more complex and extended than what is
              included in this book. (I think)

              And, since the 1802 is a "hobbyist" microprocessor, more information on interfacing
              circuits to it, using its I/O, and DMA, etc., or even building a computer with it,  although
              that might be a book unto itself. (Lee Hart already did most of that with the Membership Card
              manual, and similarly the Elf2K manual)

              But the market for anything like this/these is so vertical, that it would have to be done for
              the love of the hobby, possibly "props" / 'community notoriety', etc. Part of the 'problem'
              is that many/most 1802 microcomputers have very limited user and data interfaces, except
              for the Elf2K, and possibly a few others. So the 'toy' aspect kind of gets in the way.

              It's been quite awhile since I've looked at or read a microprocessor or microcontroller
              programming book, especially one that is for "advanced programmers". I suppose if I
              looked at one of those it would remind me, inspire me, give me ideas, and point me in
              the direction of what could be done similarly for the 1802 in that respect.

              Anyway, as I mentioned elsewhere, I recently paid $50 for my copy of this book.
              It's an ex-library copy in pretty good shape. Is that even "legal"? Probably only if the
              library sold it, which they do sometimes do. Hopefully people aren't stealing these from
              libraries and selling them because they are so high-priced now. All references to whatever
              library it was have been 'destroyed'. So I guess I'm probably not going to gaol for
              'receiving stolen property', or anything like that. The $50 price tag was worth it for
              the collectability aspects. It will most-likely only be sold when I die. And I could go at
              any time, so people might want to get on my waiting list. ;o) (or you could take a chance
              that you're in my will -- you probably shouldn't get your hopes up, though)

              – Bill



            • Adam Trionfo
              Looking forward to the book being available. Well it be searchable? Adam
              Message 6 of 18 , May 2, 2013
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                Looking forward to the book being available.  Well it be searchable?
                 
                Adam
                 
                > To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
                > From: tom@...
                > Date: Wed, 1 May 2013 11:54:02 +0000
                > Subject: [cosmacelf] Re: Book Review: Programmer's Guide to the 1802
                >
                > Thanks for the detailed review of my book. You are correct that my assembler is not a full-blown product, but more of a translator that I wrote for my own use (long before I wrote the book) after growing tired of hand encoding machine code instructions. It works, but my Cosmac VIP being cramped for memory, it has zero frills! PS: I'm going to create a pdf of the book and offer it on my web site soon. -- ts
                >
                > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, William Donnelly <william@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > I did a quick-read of my "Programmer's Guide to the 1802
                > > (with an Assembler for Your Machine)" by Tom Swan.
                > > 156+ pages. (Preface, etc.) Published 1981 by Hayden Book Co.
                > > First edition. (was it ever re-printed after first-run? probably not)
                > >
                > > The book is a nice introduction to programming for beginning programmers
                > > with a specific, extended focus on and for beginning 1802 programmers.
                > > That is pretty much the extent of the book. Though it is fairly complete in
                > > what it covers, and is more than adequate for the beginner, and possibly
                > > beginning intermediate, 1802 programmer.
                > >
                > > The author used a "4k Cosmac VIP" for programming. There are a few B&W
                > > photos,
                > > of the VIP and what I assume is its internal board, and several graphics.
                > >
                > > The main section/chapter "Fundamentals of Assembly Language" would be better
                > > titled "Fundamentals of Machine Language" imo. Although there are those
                > > who use
                > > the two terms interchangeably. I am of the opinion that Assembly
                > > Language specifically
                > > uses a fairly complete Assembler to program, using a source code file,
                > > and a resulting
                > > assembled program and/or object file that needs a linker to create the
                > > final program,
                > > and Machine Language deals more with "low-level" opcode and mnemonic
                > > instructions
                > > and such. The chapter is fairly complete, with specific focus on the
                > > 1802 instruction set
                > > and microprocessor functionality. (DMA, etc.) There are occasional
                > > references to the
                > > 1861 video display chip here and there.
                > >
                > > The 1802 instruction set is covered for each instruction. Most of this
                > > looks like
                > > it was taken from the MPM-201x CDP1802 Users Manual, including timing
                > > diagrams,
                > > internal architecture, etc. There may be additional commentary beyond
                > > that of the
                > > manual in some of the instructions covered.
                > >
                > > The simple "assembler" is actually PART of a Monitor, that only performs
                > > "assembly"
                > > of the single line user input of a single opcode and disassembly of the
                > > resulting code.
                > > (for 'user verification') Therefore the admitted minimal operation of
                > > "does not support
                > > the use of labels, macros, or mathematical expressions". (mostly because
                > > it's not really
                > > a true/full "Assembler") It is written in 1802 code, so there is
                > > something, or much, to be
                > > learned by studying that code. There is only an "assembly-like" program
                > > listing, no hex dump for entry.
                > >
                > > The user stores up to 32 bytes of input into the input/output buffer,
                > > calls the
                > > ASMBLR routine, and it "assembles" the single line mnemonic into an opcode,
                > > stores the result in memory via register RA, and then calls its internal
                > > "Disassembler" (DISASM)
                > > routine to store the disassembled opcode into the I/O buffer. (this
                > > increments RA to the
                > > next location) If an error occurs, RA is not changed. "All possible
                > > errors are not recognized
                > > by ASMBLR, although most common ones will be caught." (for example, LDN
                > > R0 is accepted
                > > (00h) and disassembles into IDL)
                > >
                > > It is up to the user to provide the Input, Output and Control routines
                > > to use the Dis/Assembler.
                > > The author mentions the "operating system", so he must / might be
                > > referring to
                > > something the Cosmac VIP had already with its ROM 'monitor' or whatever
                > > it had. (?)
                > > There is very little information about the VIP. (effectively none)
                > >
                > > To perform something more like a real Assembler would act would require
                > > the user
                > > to load the source text of the code line by line and send it to the
                > > ASMBLR routine,
                > > possibly using the returned output to create a 'list file'. The DISASM
                > > routine may be
                > > called separately for something akin to a monitor 'list' command, but in
                > > a loop,
                > > once for each instruction.
                > >
                > > There is "A Mini Library" of several routines included as the last chapter.
                > > These are usable, and somewhat educational (for study/learning), as well.
                > >
                > > The intermediate or advanced programmer, especially 1802 programmer,
                > > needs a more advanced book. (that, afaik, is not available) I would have
                > > to think
                > > about what an "advanced book" might have that is not in this book.
                > >
                > > Maybe this is all that is really needed for the 1802, and if you are
                > > past the beginner
                > > programmer level, then there is little more to offer. Perhaps some
                > > advanced programming
                > > 'tricks', a good in-depth explanation of the 1861 programming and usage,
                > > some more,
                > > more-advanced "library" routines so you don't have to reinvent the
                > > wheel, explanation
                > > of the use of a good, actual Assembler (included?), an in-depth
                > > explanation of CHIP-8
                > > and how to write programs with it, possibly something like the CDP1802
                > > manuals contain,
                > > some of the code and concepts of which are more complex and extended
                > > than what is
                > > included in this book. (I think)
                > >
                > > And, since the 1802 is a "hobbyist" microprocessor, more information on
                > > interfacing
                > > circuits to it, using its I/O, and DMA, etc., or even building a
                > > computer with it, although
                > > that might be a book unto itself. (Lee Hart already did most of that
                > > with the Membership Card
                > > manual, and similarly the Elf2K manual)
                > >
                > > But the market for anything like this/these is so vertical, that it
                > > would have to be done for
                > > the love of the hobby, possibly "props" / 'community notoriety', etc.
                > > Part of the 'problem'
                > > is that many/most 1802 microcomputers have very limited user and data
                > > interfaces, except
                > > for the Elf2K, and possibly a few others. So the 'toy' aspect kind of
                > > gets in the way.
                > >
                > > It's been quite awhile since I've looked at or read a microprocessor or
                > > microcontroller
                > > programming book, especially one that is for "advanced programmers". I
                > > suppose if I
                > > looked at one of those it would remind me, inspire me, give me ideas,
                > > and point me in
                > > the direction of what could be done similarly for the 1802 in that respect.
                > >
                > > Anyway, as I mentioned elsewhere, I recently paid $50 for my copy of
                > > this book.
                > > It's an ex-library copy in pretty good shape. Is that even "legal"?
                > > Probably only if the
                > > library sold it, which they do sometimes do. Hopefully people aren't
                > > stealing these from
                > > libraries and selling them because they are so high-priced now. All
                > > references to whatever
                > > library it was have been 'destroyed'. So I guess I'm probably not going
                > > to gaol for
                > > 'receiving stolen property', or anything like that. The $50 price tag
                > > was worth it for
                > > the collectability aspects. It will most-likely only be sold when I die.
                > > And I could go at
                > > any time, so people might want to get on my waiting list. ;o) (or you
                > > could take a chance
                > > that you're in my will -- you probably shouldn't get your hopes up, though)
                > >
                > > -- Bill
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > ========================================================
                > Visit the COSMAC ELF website at http://www.cosmacelf.comYahoo! Groups Links
                >
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              • urrossum@att.net
                ... Even if Mr. Swan simply scans the book, rather than printing the original digital file to a virtual PDF printer, the more recent versions of Adobe have
                Message 7 of 18 , May 2, 2013
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                  > Looking forward to the book being available. Well it be searchable? Adam

                  Even if Mr. Swan simply scans the book, rather than printing the original digital file to a virtual PDF printer, the more recent versions of Adobe have gotten very good at OCR-ing the scanned text. It's not quite accurate enough for source listings, but for normal prose it's just fine. At that point, the document becomes searchable.
                  ~~
                  Mark Moulding
                • Adam Trionfo
                  A mostly-accurate, or even, kinda-accurate OCR is fine... as long as it s not the ONLY way to read the text. Having the original text is extremely important.
                  Message 8 of 18 , May 2, 2013
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                    A mostly-accurate, or even, kinda-accurate OCR is fine... as long as it's not the ONLY way to read the text.  Having the original text is extremely important.  The internet is littered with scanned and OCRed tech manuals that don't have the original text and they are not worth reading.  They may be much smaller (kilobytes compared to many megabytes), but are not useful except as a way to tease the reader to get the "real thing."
                     
                    Tom, I know that you were offered the book as a pdf.  I also have a copy of it in the format.  A quite good one.  If you'd like me to send it to you let me know and I'll do that.  I'm out of town right now, so it would have to wait until I get home.
                     
                    Hmm.  Any 1802 user in Baltimore?  I've never seen an ELF before...
                     
                    Adam
                     
                    > To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
                    > From: mark@...
                    > Date: Thu, 2 May 2013 16:08:14 +0000
                    > Subject: [cosmacelf] Re: Book Review: Programmer's Guide to the 1802
                    >
                    > > Looking forward to the book being available. Well it be searchable? Adam
                    >
                    > Even if Mr. Swan simply scans the book, rather than printing the original digital file to a virtual PDF printer, the more recent versions of Adobe have gotten very good at OCR-ing the scanned text. It's not quite accurate enough for source listings, but for normal prose it's just fine. At that point, the document becomes searchable.
                    > ~~
                    > Mark Moulding
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > ========================================================
                    > Visit the COSMAC ELF website at http://www.cosmacelf.comYahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    > <*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
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                  • Charles Richmond
                    ... Searchable is nice... but this is the kind of book you ll want to *read* and *understand*! A few weeks ago I had access to a copy via interlibrary loan.
                    Message 9 of 18 , May 2, 2013
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                      On May 2, 2013, at 11:08 AM, urrossum@... wrote:

                      > > Looking forward to the book being available. Well it be
                      > searchable? Adam
                      >
                      > Even if Mr. Swan simply scans the book, rather than printing the
                      > original digital file to a virtual PDF printer, the more recent
                      > versions of Adobe have gotten very good at OCR-ing the scanned
                      > text. It's not quite accurate enough for source listings, but for
                      > normal prose it's just fine. At that point, the document becomes
                      > searchable.
                      >
                      Searchable is nice... but this is the kind of book you'll want to
                      *read* and *understand*! A few weeks ago I had access to a copy via
                      interlibrary loan. The chapter which contains explanations of each
                      instruction... has a very nice index so one can locate any particular
                      instruction that one wants explained.

                      --
                      +----------------------------------------+
                      |.....Charles and Francis Richmond.......|
                      |........................................|
                      |..plano dot net at aquaporin4 dot com...|
                      +----------------------------------------+
                    • William Donnelly
                      I m pushing for a paperback version. Something like this really needs to be hardcopy, and I don t want to be thumbing through my collector s copy. – Bill
                      Message 10 of 18 , May 2, 2013
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                        I'm pushing for a paperback version.
                        Something like this really needs to be hardcopy,
                        and I don't want to be thumbing through my
                        collector's copy.

                        – Bill
                      • Paul Birkel
                        Isn t that what they make laser printers, 3-hole punches, and binders for ... vanity-press print run isn t going to be cheap. Get the PDF; print what you need
                        Message 11 of 18 , May 3, 2013
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                          Isn't that what they make laser printers, 3-hole punches, and binders for :->?  Even these days, getting a professionally printed-n-bound vanity-press print run isn't going to be cheap.  Get the PDF; print what you need then.  I'll bet Kinkos has a deal to turn a PDF into a nice-looking double-sided hardcopy, as many times as you like.  FedEx (surprise!) offers this service as well.

                          Some example info: http://www.huatingcn.com/how-to-publish/publish-book-kinkos/

                          On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 2:52 AM, William Donnelly <william@...> wrote:
                          I'm pushing for a paperback version.
                          Something like this really needs to be hardcopy,
                          and I don't want to be thumbing through my
                          collector's copy.

                          – Bill

                          ------------------------------------

                          ========================================================
                          Visit the COSMAC ELF website at http://www.cosmacelf.comYahoo! Groups Links

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                        • Paul Backhouse
                          Absolutely. I, for one, am just grateful to Tom for considering release as a PDF. From: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com] On
                          Message 12 of 18 , May 3, 2013
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                            Absolutely…   I, for one, am just grateful to Tom for considering release as a PDF.  

                             

                            From: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Birkel
                            Sent: 03 May 2013 08:06
                            To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [cosmacelf] Re: Book Review: Programmer's Guide to the 1802

                             

                             Isn't that what they make laser printers, 3-hole punches, and binders for :->?  Even these days, getting a professionally printed-n-bound vanity-press print run isn't going to be cheap.  Get the PDF; print what you need then.  I'll bet Kinkos has a deal to turn a PDF into a nice-looking double-sided hardcopy, as many times as you like.  FedEx (surprise!) offers this service as well.


                          • Eric Tchong
                            I have the book since November 4, 1981 in my library. A pdf file of this will be great to have so you can easily print those pages you want to examine. Come
                            Message 13 of 18 , May 3, 2013
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                              I have the book since November 4, 1981 in my library.

                              A pdf file of this will be great to have so you can easily print those pages you want to examine.

                              Come visit ARUBA.

                              Eric Tchong

                               

                              From: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Backhouse
                              Sent: Friday, May 03, 2013 5:08 AM
                              To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: RE: [cosmacelf] Re: Book Review: Programmer's Guide to the 1802

                               

                               

                              Absolutely…   I, for one, am just grateful to Tom for considering release as a PDF.  

                               

                              From: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Paul Birkel
                              Sent: 03 May 2013 08:06
                              To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [cosmacelf] Re: Book Review: Programmer's Guide to the 1802

                               

                               Isn't that what they make laser printers, 3-hole punches, and binders for :->?  Even these days, getting a professionally printed-n-bound vanity-p

                            • jdrose_8_bit
                              ... Hear! Hear!
                              Message 14 of 18 , May 3, 2013
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                                --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Backhouse" <paul@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > I, for one, am just grateful to Tom for considering release as
                                > a PDF.
                                >

                                Hear! Hear!
                              • joshbensadon
                                ... I ll triple the motion. Looking forward to some good old reading :)
                                Message 15 of 18 , May 3, 2013
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                                  --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "jdrose_8_bit" <rarecoinbuyer@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Backhouse" <paul@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > I, for one, am just grateful to Tom for considering release as
                                  > > a PDF.
                                  > >
                                  >
                                  > Hear! Hear!
                                  >

                                  I'll triple the motion. Looking forward to some good old reading :)
                                • Andrew Wasson
                                  Yes, I m also really happy to hear that this book will be made available too. Thanks to Tom Swan for considering that. I still find a wealth of information
                                  Message 16 of 18 , May 3, 2013
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                                    Yes, I'm also really happy to hear that this book will be made available too. 

                                    Thanks to Tom Swan for considering that. 

                                    I still find a wealth of information when referring to some of the books and magazines I grew up with. When you're working with limited instruction sets and small memory you really have to think about how you're going to get things done. I appreciate that sort of thinking over the just grab a uController methodology. It's like using a transistor as an inverter instead of a chip when you just need one in your circuit. 

                                    Andrew 



                                    On 2013-05-03, at 3:25 PM, "joshbensadon" <joshbensadon@...> wrote:

                                     

                                    --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "jdrose_8_bit" <rarecoinbuyer@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Backhouse" <paul@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > I, for one, am just grateful to Tom for considering release as
                                    > > a PDF.
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    > Hear! Hear!
                                    >

                                    I'll triple the motion. Looking forward to some good old reading :)


                                  • Charles Richmond
                                    ... Yep, as I posted before... it s a book you re going to want to *study*. For reference, the book has good index facilities. You can easily get by without
                                    Message 17 of 18 , May 3, 2013
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                                      On May 3, 2013, at 5:25 PM, joshbensadon wrote:

                                      > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "jdrose_8_bit"
                                      > <rarecoinbuyer@...> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > >
                                      > > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Backhouse" <paul@> wrote:
                                      > > >
                                      > > > I, for one, am just grateful to Tom for considering release as
                                      > > > a PDF.
                                      > > >
                                      > >
                                      > > Hear! Hear!
                                      > >
                                      >
                                      > I'll triple the motion. Looking forward to some good old reading :)
                                      >
                                      Yep, as I posted before... it's a book you're going to want to
                                      *study*. For reference, the book has good index facilities. You can
                                      easily get by without using the computer to search the text.

                                      --
                                      +----------------------------------------+
                                      |.....Charles and Francis Richmond.......|
                                      |........................................|
                                      |..plano dot net at aquaporin4 dot com...|
                                      +----------------------------------------+
                                    • William Donnelly
                                      No, REAL, actual Publish On Demand (POD) books are pretty easy to do and are basically free to do, and sell on Amazon. And they are not a bunch of printed
                                      Message 18 of 18 , May 4, 2013
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                                        No, REAL, actual Publish On Demand (POD) books are pretty easy to do and
                                        are basically "free" to do, and sell on Amazon. And they are not a bunch of printed pages
                                        cheaply bound, they are actual, real paperback books. That we could probably purchase
                                        for around $15, and Tom would make a small amount. (maybe about $5 per copy, but
                                        that's up to what the author wants to set his net to over and above the base cost)

                                        – Bill

                                        On 5/3/2013 12:06 AM, Paul Birkel wrote:
                                         

                                        Isn't that what they make laser printers, 3-hole punches, and binders for :->?  Even these days, getting a professionally printed-n-bound vanity-press print run isn't going to be cheap.  Get the PDF; print what you need then.  I'll bet Kinkos has a deal to turn a PDF into a nice-looking double-sided hardcopy, as many times as you like.  FedEx (surprise!) offers this service as well.

                                        Some example info: http://www.huatingcn.com/how-to-publish/publish-book-kinkos/

                                        On Fri, May 3, 2013 at 2:52 AM, William Donnelly <william@...> wrote:
                                        I'm pushing for a paperback version.
                                        Something like this really needs to be hardcopy,
                                        and I don't want to be thumbing through my
                                        collector's copy.

                                        – Bill

                                        ------------------------------------

                                        ========================================================
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