Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: My 1802 has been running code for me for 32 years today!

Expand Messages
  • jdrose_8_bit
    ... Absolutely.
    Message 1 of 28 , Apr 28, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "joshbensadon" wrote:
      >
      > Please do post pictures of your ELF!
      >
      > We all enjoy seeing how everyone else built theirs.
      >

      Absolutely.
    • Kevin
      Wow, someone dug up my old post! Remind me in a couple days (when I m home) and I ll post some pix for y all.
      Message 2 of 28 , Apr 28, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Wow, someone dug up my old post! Remind me in a couple days (when I'm home) and I'll post some pix for y'all.

        --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "joshbensadon" <joshbensadon@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "jdrose_8_bit" <rarecoinbuyer@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Wonderful story.
        > >
        > > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin P. Rice" <kriceslo@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Hi all,
        > > >
        > > > In 1977 I was in 4th grade (9 years old). I'd already built an LED winky-dink in 3rd grade and regularly read Popular Electronics. One day my dad brought home a bunch of parts and a 1802 and I went to work soldering up an ELF using 24 AWG wire.
        >
        > Lot's of great stuff here, snipped.
        >
        > > >
        > > > I'll post pictures of my ELF if anyone is interested.
        > > >
        > > > Kevin
        > > > San Luis Obispo, CA
        >
        >
        > YES, YES, YES! Please do post pictures of your ELF! We all enjoy seeing how everyone else built theirs.
        >
        > :)J
        >
      • jdrose_8_bit
        ... Good point. FORTH is so flexible that it can be bare metal and high level at the same time. It offers a warm veneer to soften the edges while slipping in
        Message 3 of 28 , Apr 28, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Mr. Hart wrote:
          >
          > ... FORTH is a pretty low "high level language"...
          >

          Good point. FORTH is so flexible that it can be bare metal and high level at the same time.

          It offers a warm veneer to soften the edges while slipping in the ability to slice bits and push the stack.
        • jdrose_8_bit
          I knew about the FORTH processors. Thank you. However, I was thinking there are microprocessors that run even higher level languages like BASIC, Java and
          Message 4 of 28 , Apr 29, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            I knew about the FORTH processors. Thank you.

            However, I was thinking there are microprocessors that run even higher level languages like BASIC, Java and FORTRAN natively. Perhaps I am mistaken in how they operate.

            --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Lee Hart <leeahart@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Charlie Moore, the creator of the FORTH language, has been doing this
            > for many decades. Since FORTH is a pretty low "high level language", it
            > is easy to make special-purpose CPUs that run FORTH directly.
            >
          • Chuck Bigham
            It depends on what you mean by natively. Microcontrollers like the Picaxe and BASIC Stamp have a built-in interpreter for BASIC, and that s the way that you
            Message 5 of 28 , Apr 29, 2013
            • 0 Attachment

              It depends on what you mean by “natively.” Microcontrollers like the Picaxe and BASIC Stamp have a built-in interpreter for BASIC, and that’s the way that you program them. But the interpreter is an assembly language program pre-programmed into the underlying processor (PIC for the Picaxe, I’m not sure what for the Stamp).

               

              In that sense you could have a “native” processor for even 4th-generation languages like C# and Visual Basic – just build an IL interpreter in assembly language for the target processor – and then download the IL files from the .NET compilers.

               

              Chuck

               

              From: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com [mailto:cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of jdrose_8_bit
              Sent: Monday, April 29, 2013 10:12 AM
              To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [cosmacelf] Re: My 1802 has been running code for me for 32 years today!

               

               

              I knew about the FORTH processors. Thank you.

              However, I was thinking there are microprocessors that run even higher level languages like BASIC, Java and FORTRAN natively. Perhaps I am mistaken in how they operate.

              --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Lee Hart <leeahart@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Charlie Moore, the creator of the FORTH language, has been doing this
              > for many decades. Since FORTH is a pretty low "high level language", it
              > is easy to make special-purpose CPUs that run FORTH directly.
              >

            • Lee Hart
              ... There is a fuzzy border between a true HLL (High Level Language), and a CPU that truly executes machine code. Lots of HLL compile into a byte code, which
              Message 6 of 28 , Apr 29, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                On 4/29/2013 12:12 PM, jdrose_8_bit wrote:
                > I knew about the FORTH processors. Thank you. However, I was thinking
                > there are microprocessors that run even higher level languages like
                > BASIC, Java and FORTRAN natively. Perhaps I am mistaken in how they
                > operate.

                There is a fuzzy border between a true HLL (High Level Language), and a
                CPU that truly executes machine code.

                Lots of HLL compile into a byte code, which is a compacted form that is
                easier for a real CPU to emulate. The byte code then gets compiled or
                interpreted into the CPU's native instruction set. Smalltalk, BASIC,
                ucsdPascal, FORTH, and Java are some examples that come to mind.

                But in a few cases, CPUs have been built that can "directly" execute one
                of these byte codes. The trouble is that "directly" often means by using
                microcode, or a program in ROM. In effect, they modified the CPU's
                native instruction set to be more like the byte code. Smalltalk, the
                LISP machine, and Moore's FORTH engines took this approach. The CPU
                doesn't literally execute the English language version of the source,
                but it does directly execute the byte code.

                In the past, the amount of hardware needed to directly execute source
                code would have been staggering. But today, it's not all that hard to
                imagine doing, especially with HLLs that aren't all that "high".
                --
                If we knew what we were doing, it wouldn't be called research, would it?
                -- Albert Einstein
                --
                Lee A. Hart, http://www.sunrise-ev.com/LeesEVs.htm
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.