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Re: [cosmacelf] Re: My latest elf2k in a case project

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  • Andrew Wasson
    Well yes.... I did in fact use my mom s nail polish on a number of projects back then. Unfortunately I was trying to use it to make the letters and numbers and
    Message 1 of 51 , Dec 31, 2012
      Well yes.... I did in fact use my mom's nail polish on a number of projects back then. Unfortunately I was trying to use it to make the letters and numbers and ended up making a mess.

      I didn't build an elf until about 1980 when I was 16 but I did make a number of failed attempts at hex keypads and various memory devices between the ages of about 13 - 15; pretty much as soon as I could get to Radio Shack under my own steam. Back then all I needed was a recent copy of Popular Electronics, my newspaper money and Radio Shack to keep me entirely occupied.

      Andrew 



      On 2012-12-31, at 7:31 PM, Kevin wrote:

       

      I used a brush-on clear coat on my ELF's dry transfer labels. It looks like globs of nail polish over the numbers. Hey, I was 9 or 10 then...

      --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Wasson <awasson@...> wrote:
      >
      > Yeah, I couldn't get anything lined up back in the 70's myself either but that was because I was about 15 years old and lacked the patience and experience.
      >
      > Times change though... A buddy of mine just used letraset to restore the hand controls for his vintage motorcycle and you wouldn't know that it wasn't a factory fresh part. He clear coated the part with a mat clear once he was done to protect it and I don't think anything will rub off now.
      >
      > Different materials though. The hand control is a plastic housing and we're using aluminium but it's worth a try in my opinion. A mat clear coat will probably look like clear anodized aluminum and keep it from oxidizing too. A win-win situation if it works.
      >
      > Andrew
      >
      >
      > On 2012-12-31, at 5:27 PM, Kevin wrote:
      >
      > > I used dry transfer lettering on my original ELF in '77 but it's really next to impossible to align perfectly and is susceptible to rubbing off. Okay for hobby. I love an all-pro look, though.
      > >
      > > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Andrew Wasson <awasson@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I think what you ended up with is quite fantastic and I think I may pull one of mine apart to copy yours... I think it's that great!
      > > >
      > > > For lettering I think I'll use letraset dry transfer lettering. It's probably going to be the best way to get what we're looking for: http://www.letraset.com/products/91-Lettering/
      > > >
      > > > By the way, Happy New Years everyone!
      > > >
      > > > Andrew
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > On 2012-12-31, at 4:33 PM, Kevin wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > One MAJOR cosmetic difference I would have pursued:
      > > > >
      > > > > Get the enclosure panels cut by a professional with engraved lettering (no label tape), brushed, anodized, and paint the engraved lettering.
      > > > >
      > > > > Here's an example project that I had cut and engraved:
      > > > > http://www.tek4.com/ForSale/Genelec1031Level/duals.jpg
      > > > > http://www.tek4.com/ForSale/Genelec1031Level/rear2.jpg
      > > > >
      > > > > I used to work with a machinist in Burbank who specialized in this. I could draw any panel in AutoCAD and it would turn out FLAWLESS.
      > > > >
      > > > > He could also cut plastic lens filters (LCD, LED, opaque IR remote, etc.) such as would be nice for the hex displays. I had the plastic inserts cut oversize, then chamfered so they would insert from the back side making the front side flush with the metal panel. It was tight within 1/100th of an inch.
      > > > >
      > > > > I've also used silk-screening for a couple projects, including multiple colors for logos.
      > > > >
      > > > > Engraved panels look robust and military, while silk screening produces a more mass-produced "real product" look. One could go either way here. Silk screening is a bit more for one unit, but quickly becomes cost effective for multiple panels.
      > > > >
      > > > > Cost to cut the two panels in this project would range from $250 to $400. I despise imperfect cuts and label tape enough to spend that on a show piece like this one.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, Mark G Thomas <mark@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Hi,
      > > > > >
      > > > > > On Sat, Dec 29, 2012 at 09:29:29PM -0500, Dennis Boone wrote:
      > > > > > > > I ordered several of these cases from Digikey
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Mark,
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > You don't happen to have a manufacturer or part number for that case
      > > > > > > handy, do you?
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Here are some of the Digikey numbers:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Cabinet: 377-1497-ND EX-4523 BOX ALUM 9.32X6.14X3.15" BLK/SLV $46.60
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Switches: 450-1311-ND MTF106D SWITCH TOGGLE SPDT FLAT ACT LUG $10.62
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Input pushbutton (click action, low pressure): CKN4022-ND 8125SHZBE $5.13
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Black Pushbutton Cap: CKN1104-ND 752702000 $0.46
      > > > > >
      > > > > > The switches were expensive, but worth it. I just wish I could find
      > > > > > the matching but momentary MTF-106F ones without a crazy minimum order
      > > > > > quantity, since I'd like to also use them on my SBC6120-RC project.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I ended up with a variety of different 4-40 aluminum spacers with
      > > > > > fiber washers, so that the boards aligned right with each other and
      > > > > > the channels on the inside of the box. It was such a tight fit that
      > > > > > I had to use a bare header for the IDE ribbon cable and not quite fully
      > > > > > seated for side of the connector and cable to clear the ridges on the
      > > > > > inside of the extruded case. If I'd fully realized earlier on how tight
      > > > > > a fit it would work out to be, I would have abandoned the idea and found
      > > > > > a larger case. Even the hex stanadoffs have to be rotated with the flat
      > > > > > sides just right or they are too wide to fit.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I also learned my lesson about testing plenty before assembling everything.
      > > > > > My soft speaker was because I initially got the transistor backward. The
      > > > > > machine would occasionally not come up from a power-on-reset. After
      > > > > > replacing the EconoReset and swapping a lot of ICs with another elf2k, I
      > > > > > discovered it was a flaky EPROM. My initial elfdisk card also seemed to
      > > > > > cause random lock-ups, which I think I've tracked down to the UART chip
      > > > > > I'd reused from my junk collection. The machine is finally back together
      > > > > > and working reliably!
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Mark
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --
      > > > > > Mark G. Thomas (Mark@)
      > > > > >
      > > > >




    • David Keith
      Thanks Craig, I see you are right.  I keep on forgetting that the System 370 ISA is/was not a physical architecture, but one that was emulated in the
      Message 51 of 51 , Feb 18, 2013
        Thanks Craig,
        I see you are right.  I keep on forgetting that the System 370 ISA is/was not a physical architecture, but one that was emulated in the mircocode/programming of the underlying model hardware.  Looks like 370/138 model was actually a 16 bit word, with only a maximum addressable memory of 1 mega bytes.
        Good Catch
        Dave


        From: cstull <cstull@...>
        To: David Keith <beloved_wind@...>
        Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 3:03 PM
        Subject: Re: My latest elf2k in a case project
        Hi Dave,
        I think you are mistaken on the 370/138 control panel.  If you go to images.google.com and type in IBM 370/138 you will see that the item that was on ebay is identical to the 138 panel.  The 3705 panel doesn't look at all like it.
        The 138 must have been a shorter address machine because with five hex knobs to address memory, that would mean that the maximum addressable memory (FFFFF) would have been 1 meg.
        Lots of iron for a 1 meg machine.

        Craig

        --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, David Keith <beloved_wind@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks Bill, glad to see some old time mainframe system 370 programmers still out there.  I am aware of the Hercules 370 emulator, but never have/had the time to download it and play with it.
        >
        > Found this link for a IBM System 370 control panel for sell out on eBay, BUT it looks like someone took a IBM 3705 Communications Controller and fit it to be a 370/138 console.  NOT enough lights (16 bits + 2 parity) when there should be 32 bits + 4 parity, also not enough rotary selection switches at the bottom.  Very good conversation piece, LOL
        >
        > http://www.ebay.com/itm/321051214549?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649
        >
        > Thanks
        > Dave




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