Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [cosmacelf] Re: YA1802E

Expand Messages
  • rdoerr@bizserve.com
    Hello Ted, You have some cool projects! I looked around and it appears you can still get the 74181 chips. Best price that I ve found is here:
    Message 1 of 37 , Aug 2, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello Ted,

      You have some cool projects! I looked around and it appears you can still get the 74181 chips. Best price that I've found is here:

      http://unicornelectronics.com/IC/7400.html

      You can also get them as NTE parts from many places as NTE74181 It looks like Mouser has over 400 of them:

      http://www.mouser.com/search/ProductDetail.aspx?qs=2AaWgLtd6%2f1jxe5UDtnS2Q%3d%3d&cm_mmc=findchips-_-na-_-na-_-na

      Maybe this will help if you decide to finish it.

      Robert

      -----Original Message-----
      From: "ted_rossin" <ted_rossin@...>
      Sent: Thursday, August 2, 2012 12:50pm
      To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [cosmacelf] Re: YA1802E



      Instead of spice I would recommend Verilog for a simulator. There is a very nice freeware version available here:

      http://iverilog.icarus.com/

      I wrote a little tool for Eagle CAD to convert the netlist into Verilog code so that I could simulate a TTL computer that I started working on. I made models of all my favorite TTL parts and was able to draw schematics, simulate and view the results in my VCD dump waveform viewer. This viewer can be found here:

      http://www.tedrossin.net46.net/tools/Other/Other.html

      I never finished the TTL computer as I got stuck on the ALU. The 74181 ALU chips are no longer available and it looked like it would take quite a few chips to reproduce it. It was kind of a fun but I lost interest when I started to count the number of packages to wire up compared to the speed that life seems to be going by.

      --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com, bill rowe <bill_rowe_ottawa@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > wow, sounds complex. There's a VB based emulator in the files section "visible 1802" that's an instruction-based emulator with a realtime display. I think the source is thaere but if not, just ask and I'll post it. For the chip to chip connection approach, I think most schematic packages will produce something called a netlist that says what's connected to what so you could leave the routing and other heavy lifting to them and just dp the inside chip stuff. There's also something called SPICE that does chip level emulation, probably no mudule for an 1802 but it might be something to look at.
      > To: cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com
      > From: bd@...
      > Date: Thu, 2 Aug 2012 08:57:41 +0000
      > Subject: [cosmacelf] YA1802E
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yet Another 1802 Emulator
      >
      >
      >
      > I have VB6 thanks to Mark, so I will be creating a version of the 1802
      >
      > emulator that will have a Windows GUI interface.
      >
      >
      >
      > I will be making an 1802 Class so other people can drop it in their own
      >
      > programs and use it. (if you have VBx or maybe VB.net)
      >
      >
      >
      > So I have to make a decision as to how to design the 1802 class/object.
      >
      >
      >
      > I've got two options.
      >
      >
      >
      > 1) I could make the class emulate the 1802 chip. (as much as possible)
      >
      >
      >
      > It would basically be a "40-pin chip" class/object.
      >
      > This would be an interesting way to do it. It would require external
      >
      > something-or-others to make it work, because you would need to interface
      >
      > to it and supply memory access (Read/Write), etc. You could make
      >
      > memory chips and other items their own class and more or less build
      >
      > things by connecting In/Out 'nodes' (pins). This might be overkill and
      >
      > more trouble than it's worth, although it could be fun and interesting
      >
      > and would make some things potentially easier. (like a "trainer"
      >
      > interface) Supporting things like TPA, TPB, etc. might be difficult.
      >
      > [and see comment below]
      >
      >
      >
      > 2) The class would be more of a complete 1802 emulator-like object.
      >
      > (as standalone as possible) Maybe memory would be external to the
      >
      > class and and maybe not. It would supply all the necessary interface
      >
      > properties and methods to support 'interfacing' to the GUI of choice.
      >
      > This is the one I'm leaning toward.
      >
      >
      >
      > -----
      >
      > For some years now I've wanted to make a computer / electronics
      >
      > 'development' system that allows you to make "chips" and connect
      >
      > their "pins" using a cool (and complex) GUI system for the connector
      >
      > wires. In some (many?) ways it would be fairly complex, especially
      >
      > things like the auto-routing of wires, and by grabbing them and making
      >
      > them flow in whatever specific direction you want. Each chip would be
      >
      > a "module" that can be added to the main program as a usable add-on.
      >
      >
      >
      > I think it would also be difficult to make the In's and Out's flow
      >
      > correctly to make the circuits work. This would be more of a fun
      >
      > program and not a professional circuit designer. And there would be
      >
      > no discrete devices. (resistors, capacitors, etc. -- although you might
      >
      > want to have a "clock" module that basically just gives a pulse and
      >
      > "inside" it would be "made" with a crystal oscillator and other discrete
      >
      > devices like in real life -- except it would be a variable clock)
      >
      >
      >
      > You would also have various output objects, like various color LED's,
      >
      > 7-segment and hex LED's, computer monitor, LCD screens, etc. It would
      >
      > emulate various memory chips, or a bank of memory, because you aren't
      >
      > limited to 'basic' objects. And disk drives, flash memories, etc.
      >
      >
      >
      > You could also make an 1802 CPU chip, a 6502, etc. It would be pretty
      >
      > cool but it's a pretty big project. And I'm not sure what language it
      >
      > should be written in, although I'm leaning toward VBx.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >




      ------------------------------------

      ========================================================
      Visit the COSMAC ELF website at http://www.cosmacelf.comYahoo! Groups Links





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • William Donnelly
      I ve been known to do a Proof of Concept in BASIC before, too. Especially with a particularly complex algorithm, formula, or process. -- bIll _________________
      Message 37 of 37 , Aug 5, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        I've been known to do a Proof of Concept in BASIC before, too.
        Especially with a particularly complex algorithm, formula, or process.

        -- bIll
        _________________
        (\__/) This is Bunny.
        (='.'=) Copy and paste Bunny into your signature.
        (")_(") Help Bunny gain World Domination.

        On 8/5/2012 9:03 PM, joshbensadon wrote:
        >
        > --- In cosmacelf@yahoogroups.com <mailto:cosmacelf%40yahoogroups.com>,
        > William Donnelly <william@...> wrote:
        > > programmer to convert to another language. That's another thing I've
        > > always liked about BASIC. (as opposed to almost any other language)
        >
        > Interesting you should say this. When creating a complex program in
        > assembler, I often hash out the logic in BASIC, then I code it in
        > assembler.
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.