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2186Re: [cosmacelf] Test Equipment and Circuit Debugging, was Re: surplus MSI/88e

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  • Robert L. Doerr
    Jun 3, 2004
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      Well in case anyone really needs one I believe I still have one of
      the old Heathkit PC based logic analyzers that had an ISA card and
      it's own pod complete with the software still sealed in the box. I
      came across it the other day while cleaning up the basement. If
      there is any interest send me an e-mail at rdoerr@... so
      we don't clog up the list with any off topic stuff. In the meantime
      i'll see if I can track down all the specs and model number for it.

      Regards,

      Robert

      Mark Graybill wrote:

      > On Jun 2, 2004, at 11:05 PM, sbirdasn wrote:
      >
      >
      >>There's also BITSCOPE, a budget (or even roll your own if you like)
      >>A/D and logic (8-bits) capture-to-PC interface card.
      >>
      >>Link: http://www.bitscope.com/
      >>
      >>Maybe $300-400 is a bit much for your idea of "budget", but it's not
      >>bad compared to $4-6K (or more) for "real" test gear.
      >
      >
      > Saelig also has inexpensive 8-bit and 16-bit USB-based logic analyzers
      > (a bit over $200 and $300 with clips):
      > http://www.saelig.com/ANT16.htm
      > http://www.saelig.com/ANT8.htm
      >
      > There are probably some other similar products elsewhere. There's also
      > SoftLA, an old DOS program that B.G. Micro still sells for about $30,
      > add your own hardware to your PC parallel port for inputs. It saves the
      > trouble of writing the software, and allows 16 channels on
      > bidirectional ports. And being an "old DOS program" is no judgement on
      > its capability, a friend of mine who is also an
      > instrumentation/controls engineer swears by it.
      >
      > Personally I prefer instruments that don't require a PC attached, but
      > PC-based instruments can be awfully cheap if you consider the PC
      > already paid for.
      >
      > Lee's approach of using an Elf is pretty neat. To give yourself more
      > "bandwidth" you can reduce the operating frequency of the Elf under
      > study. When I first build one up, I usually start by clocking it off a
      > signal generator at 100KHz or so to make it easier to watch what's
      > going on (I've gone as low as 1Hz or clocked it off a switch, too.)
      >
      > -Mark G.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ========================================================
      > Visit the COSMAC ELF website at http://www.cosmacelf.com
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >

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      e-mail: <rdoerr@...>

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