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Great Analysis Drizler - Keep on Drizzling over Corn

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  • Harry & Linda Clift
    Corn is safe, clean, cost effective, stable in price, smokeless, locally available, has over 2 million local competitive American suppliers, is consistent in
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 5, 2005
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      Corn is safe, clean, cost effective, stable in price, smokeless,
      locally available, has over 2 million local competitive American
      suppliers, is consistent in BTU value, efficient and environmentally
      friendly. By comparison, soy beans varied in price from $3 to $12
      last year, biomass has good BTU value per pound but the volume would
      fill the room to be heated, wood smokes and makes 50% ash, coal is
      clean with a full time operator and the correct burner/boiler
      combination, electricity is the world's greatest polluter not to
      mention the escalating price, natural gas is 100 times more
      pollutant than corn and never again to be the low cost American
      energy, propane tanks are expensive bombs twice a threat, most
      energy sources including Canadian wood pellets have two to five
      remote uncontrollable foreign suppliers, hydrogen is the purported
      THE perfect fuel and can be safely transported so long as the
      hydrogen is locked up in a corn kernel. The US government has a 20
      year plan to figure how to produce, safely transport, and convert
      hydrogen to energy. Corn is immediately available, renewable,
      safely transportable, and consist of HYDROGEN and carbon. - DUH!

      Unless one just has an inherent hate for the local hard working
      American farmer and falls head over hills in love with a remote
      uncontrollable energy that may well be returned by a terrorist DUH!

      Drizler, What was that other perfect fuel you are drizzling about?

      There are two down sides for corn.
      1. Corn is not for the lazy and excessively busy.
      2. Corn is not convenient for the rampant run government control,
      rich blooded unlimited funded remote controlled world travel.

      Harry and Linda

      --- In cornplace@yahoogroups.com, "Drizler" <drizler@y...> wrote:
      > Harry, I don't get the whole "please distinguish corn stoves wood
      > pellet stoves, multiple fuel stoves" thing you are talking about
      here.
      > I get the impression that you feel burning anything else but corn
      in
      > a " corn stove" is some sort of sacralige. Whats the difference,
      who
      > cares? If someone has a stove that burns cow dung more power to
      > them. Like Maizeblaze said a while ago "god forbid someone
      mention a
      > multifuel stove".
      > Personally I can't see why something being multifuel matters in
      the
      > least beyond giving someone additional options. Yes I have got
      one.
      > Yes it doesn't like to run on the very lowest setting; I do however
      > run the cheapest grade of garbage corn I can lay my hands on. To
      > thwart the issue I sometimes have to light it once a day or just
      run
      > it hotter and open a window some. Either option works and I don't
      > care if you are heating with electric you should open a window and
      let
      > some fresh air in daily. Mine even has the dreaded fuel stirrer
      which
      > strikes terror into the hearts of all. It spits the black dust
      on my
      > deck which blows or washes away when it rains.
      > My question is this: Why is a pure corn burner any better
      than a
      > multifuel other than that you don't sell them? Please enlighten
      me,
      > I might learn something here.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In cornplace@yahoogroups.com, "Harry & Linda Clift"
      <haclift@y...>
      > wrote:
      > > Please distinguish corn stoves from wood stoves, wood pellet
      stoves,
      > > multiple fuel stoves, gas, oil, electric, propane, and all other
      non-
      > > corn fuels. 100% Whole kernel shelled corn from the farm is the
      fuel
      > > for corn stoves.
      > >
      > > No fuel cost less than corn. None. Name one.
      > > Free wood cut-your-own cost more than corn
      > > considering total tool cost cutting,splitting,hauling,storing,
      smoke
      > > damage, doctor bills, lung damage.
      > > Corn cost more in 1817 than in 2005.
      > > No stove cost more than a corn stove.
      > >
      > > How often is fuel bought?
      > > How seldom is a stove bought?
      > >
      > > Which saves more?
      > > Paying for the fuel or
      > > paying for the stove?
      > > The phrase is,
      > > "Pay me now or pay me later".
      > >
      > > A properly selected corn stove will save enough money the first
      year
      > > to pay for the corn stove. Second and subsequent years corn fuel
      > > cost is relatively inexpensive, comfortable, safe, healthy.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In cornplace@yahoogroups.com, "librarianwhs"
      <cwilliams22@c...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > I've been reading a great deal about corn stoves and pellet
      stoves
      > > on
      > > > this group as well as the corn stove and pellet stove groups.
      I've
      > > > also read about them on several other forums and am trying to
      make
      > > a
      > > > decision. I must make it clear that I am trying very hard to
      keep
      > > my
      > > > initial costs down. I don't have anything against stove
      dealers
      > > > making a profit. I have a small business myself. However,
      each
      > > of us
      > > > must do what we can to economise. I have been reading about
      > > Dansons
      > > > stoves on their web site. I also downloaded their installation
      > > > manuals and read them. I did a search here and on corn
      stove's
      > > group,
      > > > but couldn't find any information about their reliability. Any
      > > > experiences any of you have had with these products might help
      me
      > > make
      > > > my decision. There is a dealer of these products within 50
      miles
      > > of
      > > > me, but I have not yet visited them. I looked at some Magnum
      > > stoves at
      > > > a dealer about 25 miles away and I think they are nice stoves,
      but
      > > > very spendy. The one I like is 2400.00 plus tax. Quite
      simply, I
      > > > cannot afford that kind of cash. I have also looked at The US
      > > Stove
      > > > product, which is available in two different stores in my
      area.
      > > They
      > > > were running around 1700.00
      > > >
      > > > I know that many of you don't seem to like any brand of stove
      that
      > > is
      > > > sold by hardware or big box stores. I understand how dealers
      > > feel.
      > > > As a Class 01 very small time firearms dealer, I have to deal
      with
      > > the
      > > > big stores too. However, I have found a niche and am able to
      do
      > > some
      > > > business that way. Aren't there any of the stoves sold by non
      > > > dedicated sources that are worth looking at? Why not? I
      know I
      > > > can't expect sales people to know all about them, but that
      doesn't
      > > > mean they are automatically poor products does it? As a
      firearms
      > > > dealer, I hear a lot about getting what you pay for. That is
      > > sometimes
      > > > true, but it doesn't mean that less expensive guns are
      worthless.
      > > And
      > > > it doesn't always mean that paying more for an expensive gun
      will
      > > > translate into better service. I know this for an absolute
      fact and
      > > > believe I owe it to my customers to be honest with them even
      if I
      > > make
      > > > less money selling them a less expensive item.
      > > >
      > > > I think I am capable of doing the install myself. After
      reading
      > > the
      > > > manuals on several of these stoves, it seems that safety must
      be
      > > > first, followed closely by a good vent installation. I will be
      > > going
      > > > through the wall and using an outside air connection as well.
      > > Initial
      > > > burn and setup will be a good learning time to get air and
      feed
      > > rates
      > > > adjusted. I will also be looking in the best sources of good
      > > quality
      > > > corn. We have a feed mill not far from me as well as a number
      of
      > > > local farmers who might sell quality corn in bulk pretty
      cheaply.
      > > >
      > > > Any help any of you can give me will be very much appreciated.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Don Williams
      > > > New Vienna, OH
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