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Corn Combustion - 671 deg F, 16% Oxygen, 1 atm press

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  • tennesseecornstoves
    Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org Citation: No Citation available. Authors:
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 25, 2008
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      Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological
      Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org
      Citation: No Citation available.
      Authors: Katherine E. Treier, Mary H. Wicks, Harold M. Keener,
      Keywords: Energy, biomass, combustion
      Fossil fuels currently meet 86% of U.S. energy needs. Bio-fuels, such
      as ethanol produced from shelled corn, have been touted as an
      alternative for liquid fuels. However, numerous studies have
      concluded, ethanol production has an overall energy conversion
      efficiency of only 34-56%. In contrast, direct combustion of shelled
      corn using an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system can
      produce thermal energy for heating space, water or a process for
      small industries (agriculture, greenhouse production, food
      processing, manufacturing), and buildings (homes, shopping centers,
      schools, hospitals, prisons, government) with a conversion efficiency
      of 70%. This paper compares using the shelled corn as a combustion
      fuel or as a feedstock for ethanol production. Results showed direct
      combustion of 1 bushel of shelled corn saves 2.29 gallons of #2 fuel
      oil (FO). This savings per bushel is 3.6 times more gallons of #2 FO
      than converting shelled corn to ethanol would replace. Using 20% of
      the US corn crop (1.8 billion bushels, the amount exported yearly
      from the U.S.) as a heating fuel substitute would save an estimated
      98 million barrels of fuel oil per year or 6.6% of the distillate oil
      usage in the US. Projected heating cost for using shelled corn is
      $9.30 per million Btu (based on ten year average corn price of
      $2.24/bushel). This cost was $4 and $14 per million Btu less than
      natural gas or fuel oil using September 2005 prices.
      300-550C ignition temp, 100-300g/m3, .1-.4 sec, 40#/cu ft, 30-60m
      (.3sec, 300g/m3,350C)

      At ambient pressure of 14.696 psia the minimum explosible
      concentration of dried biosolids from Hyperion with 0% moisture is
      150 - 320 gm/m(3). Corn starch and coal dust ignite at approximately
      50 gm/m(3). The minimum ignition temperature for Hyperion dried
      biosolids is 355 degrees C or 671 deg F and the minimum oxygen
      concentration for combustion of a dust cloud varies from 15 to 16% by
      volume.

      Corn content is 34% Hydrogen producing a blue flame and over 60%
      carbon producing a yellow flame. Correct fuel air mixture produces a
      virtually invisible flame. Corn combustion is chemically described as
      Cn + H 2n+2

      http://www.agriculture.state.ia.us/e85q&a.html
      Iowa Dept of Ag about FFV's and ethanol
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