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Corn Cost Less Mass Produced

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  • cornstoves
    Mass production of corn results in lower prices per unit of production. Corn production enjoys perfect competition between two million farms. The average farm
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 4, 2006
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      Mass production of corn results in lower prices per unit of
      production. Corn production enjoys perfect competition between two
      million farms. The average farm profit is only ten cents per bushel
      of corn. Give the local farm an additional ten cents per bushel to
      double his profit and keep him there next year. The extra ten cents
      insurance will cost the average home about $10 per year but can
      double the profit of the local farm.
      Mass production that drives prices up for greater profit applies to
      a monopoly like the local utility or to limited producers like with
      petroleum and the OPEC cartel.
      A. Corn combustion home heat must not work or everyone would know
      about it.
      Ans: If you know about corn heat, consider yourself well educated.
      B. If corn does heat homes, it must be expensive because corn is
      clean and environmentally friendly. Environmentalist are willing to
      sacrafice to protect the environment.
      Ans: No fuel cost less than corn. Corn prices vary more from store
      to store than from year to year for over 200 years recorded history.
      C. Corn combustion will burn food out of the mouths of the hungry.
      How greedy to save money on local corn heat while global hunger
      abounds.
      Ans: Local farms number about 2 million with perfect competition. A
      five percent increase in corn price (10 cents per bushel) will
      double the local farm profit margin (20 cents per bushel) resulting
      in an increase in corn production next year rather than to take
      greater risk raising cane about corn prices.
      D. Surely someone can develop a corn with higher BTU value. Nature
      can always be improved.
      Ans: Corn combustion is 98% efficient yielding more BTU/pound than
      coal (Oil, wood & coal combustion have about 50% waste). Claims of
      high BTU corn are a farce. When corn is developed with a higher BTU
      a combustion adjustment should be made. Higher priced Soybeans do
      have higher BTU value than corn and should not be used in a corn
      stove without consulting with the manufacturer and making combustion
      adjustments. Avoid any novice change that will certainly result in
      decreasing the 98% efficiency of corn stove combustion.
      E. Corn must be converted to corn oil or refined into corn ethanol.
      Petro has lots of energy.
      Ans: Local renewable corn cost less than dirt or top soil. No
      refinery is required. No squeezing is necessary. Shelling the corn
      off the cob is good enough. Petro takes one gallon to deliver each
      gallon to market.
      F. Corm combustion will drive the price of beef and pork up because
      corm combustion takes food away from livestock.
      Ans: Two hundred new corn ethanol refineries in service in year 2006
      will replace the MTBE in gasoline with corn ethanol. Affordable Low
      cost livestock feed is produced as a byproduct at corn ethanol
      refineries. Stable production of low cost feed helps stabalize beef
      and pork prices. Unless there is a monoply like with the local
      utility or limited producers like with petroleum, Mass production
      results in lower prices per unit of production.

      University professionals acknowledge corn as a viable source of
      energy.

      http://www.cornandsoybeandigest.com/news/two-ethanol-products/
      Two Products From Ethanol
      Sep 13, 2006 9:51 AM
      Ed Clark and Susan Winsor
      The ethanol industry is experimenting with fractionation –
      separation of the embryo from the rest of the corn kernel. This
      produces two separate channels:
      1) The corn endosperm (starch component representing 85% of the
      kernel) is channeled into ethanol, feedgrains and other starch-
      related products
      2) The embryo (15% of the kernel) is channeled into oil-related
      products including biodiesel.
      The embryo portion of a corn kernel typically contains about 3.5%
      oil. A North Korean hybrid is purported to contain 23% oil, or more
      than a six-fold increase in oil.
      This genetic material has come through USDA to Ron Phillips, Regents
      Professor and McKnight Presidential Chair in genomics, of The
      University of Minnesota Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics,
      who is assessing this new source of high oil corn.

      Low cost local renewable whole kernel shelled corn heat is no longer
      an alternative. Conventional heating fuels are the "Other Older
      Alternatives". Not everyone knows. It may be easier for some to
      deny the obvious than become educated on the high cost of not
      knowing.
      Don't tell them the secret of corn combustion. They will either
      outlaw it or decide to send it foreign aid. For years in the future
      some will study how to get energy from corn. Most assuredly they
      will attempt to prove it can't be done without unsurmountable
      problems. If it is possible to do certainly there is need to study
      how it can be improved before taking the uncertain and
      unquestionable risk of delving into the unknown world of corn
      combustion. Meanwhile, please don't tell them the secret of corn
      combustion.
      www.cornandsoybeandigest.com/news/two-ethanol-products/
      Two Products From Ethanol
      Sep 13, 2006 9:51 AM
      Ed Clark and Susan Winsor
      The ethanol industry is experimenting with fractionation –
      separation of the embryo from the rest of the corn kernel. This
      produces two separate channels:
      1) The corn endosperm (starch component representing 85% of the
      kernel) is channeled into ethanol, feedgrains and other starch-
      related products
      2) The embryo (15% of the kernel) is channeled into oil-related
      products including biodiesel.
      The embryo portion of a corn kernel typically contains about 3.5%
      oil. A North Korean hybrid is purported to contain 23% oil, or more
      than a six-fold increase in oil.
      This genetic material has come through USDA to Ron Phillips, Regents
      Professor and McKnight Presidential Chair in genomics, of The
      University of Minnesota Department of Agronomy and Plant Genetics,
      who is assessing this new source of high oil corn.
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