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Corn Combustion is carbon (Cn)+Hydrogen (H2n+n) released at 671-4200 deg F

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  • tennesseecornstoves
    The temperature of the tail pipe (exhaust) multiplied by flow rate represents waste heat rate. But wait, there is more. Unlike 98% efficient clean corn
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 19, 2006
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      The temperature of the tail pipe (exhaust) multiplied by flow rate
      represents waste heat rate. But wait, there is more. Unlike 98%
      efficient clean corn combustion, fossil fuel combustion at 50%
      efficiency emits Low temperature high energy effluents in the form
      of pollution (sulfur oxides, high energy nitrous oxide, hazardous
      carbon monoxide, global warming carbon dioxide, VOC's, heavy metals,
      mercury, water vapor). Except for smoke particulate matter releases
      of high opacity, white water vapor effluents that condense in air at
      low temperature, and yellow smoke releases of sulfuric acid, most
      high energy effluent releases of fossil fuels are invisible to the
      naked eye. Control emission monitors (CEMS) engineers are skilled
      to "read the stack" on occasion the expensive CEMS instrumentation
      fails. CEMS skills are limited to 0-100% opacity, water vapor, good
      guesses for sulfuric acid.


      http://asae.frymulti.com/abstract.asp?aid=21472&t=2
      If you are an ASABE member or if your employer has arranged for
      access to the full-text, click the underlined title below to view.
      Don't have access to the full text? Click here for options.
      Analysis of Shelled Corn as an Agri-Fuel - Direct Combustion vs.
      Ethanol
      Published by the American Society of Agricultural and Biological
      Engineers, St. Joseph, Michigan www.asabe.org
      Citation: No Citation available.
      Authors: Katherine E. Treier, Mary H. Wicks, Harold M. Keener,
      Keywords: Energy, biomass, combustion
      Fossil fuels currently meet 86% of U.S. energy needs. Bio-fuels,
      such as ethanol produced from shelled corn, have been touted as an
      alternative for liquid fuels. However, numerous studies have
      concluded, ethanol production has an overall energy conversion
      efficiency of only 34-56%. In contrast, direct combustion of shelled
      corn using an atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) system can
      produce thermal energy for heating space, water or a process for
      small industries (agriculture, greenhouse production, food
      processing, manufacturing), and buildings (homes, shopping centers,
      schools, hospitals, prisons, government) with a conversion
      efficiency of 70%. This paper compares using the shelled corn as a
      combustion fuel or as a feedstock for ethanol production. Results
      showed direct combustion of 1 bushel of shelled corn saves 2.29
      gallons of #2 fuel oil (FO). This savings per bushel is 3.6 times
      more gallons of #2 FO than converting shelled corn to ethanol would
      replace. Using 20% of the US corn crop (1.8 billion bushels, the
      amount exported yearly from the U.S.) as a heating fuel substitute
      would save an estimated 98 million barrels of fuel oil per year or
      6.6% of the distillate oil usage in the US. Projected heating cost
      for using shelled corn is $9.30 per million Btu (based on ten year
      average corn price of $2.24/bushel). This cost was $4 and $14 per
      million Btu less than natural gas or fuel oil using September 2005
      prices.
      300-550C ignition temp, 100-300g/m3, .1-.4 sec, 40#/cu ft, 30-60m
      (.3sec, 300g/m3,350C)

      At ambient pressure of 14.696 psia the minimum explosible
      concentration of dried biosolids from Hyperion with 0% moisture is
      150 - 320 gm/m(3). Corn starch and coal dust ignite at approximately
      50 gm/m(3). The minimum ignition temperature for Hyperion dried
      biosolids is 355 degrees C or 671 deg F and the minimum oxygen
      concentration for combustion of a dust cloud varies from 15 to 16%
      by volume.

      Corn content is 34% Hydrogen producing a blue flame and over 60%
      carbon producing a yellow flame. Correct fuel air mixture produces a
      virtually invisible flame. Corn combustion is chemically described
      as Cn + H 2n+2

      http://www.agriculture.state.ia.us/e85q&a.html
      Iowa Dept of Ag about FFV's and ethanol
    • cornstoves
      Whole kernel shelled corn combustion converts 34% Hydrogen (H2n+n) + Carbon (Cn) at 98% efficiency. Corn ethanol energy conversion is 34-56% efficient.
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 1, 2006
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        Whole kernel shelled corn combustion converts 34% Hydrogen (H2n+n) +
        Carbon (Cn) at 98% efficiency.
        Corn ethanol energy conversion is 34-56% efficient.
        Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC) of corn is 70%
        efficient.
        Shelled corn combustion of 1 bushel of shelled corn saves 2.29
        gallons of #2 fuel oil (FO). This savings per bushel is 3.6 times
        more gallons of #2 FO than converting shelled corn to ethanol would
        replace.
        20% of the US corn crop equals 1.8 billion bushels which is exported
        yearly from the U.S. The equivalent heat energy would save an
        estimated 98 million barrels of fuel oil per year or 6.6% of the
        distillate oil usage in the US.
        The cost of shelled corn is $9.30 per million Btu based on ten year
        USDA average support price for corn of $2.24/bushel. This is $14 per
        million Btu less and $4/MBTU less than fuel oil using September 2005
        prices.
        The average American home uses 50 million BTU annually. According to
        www.TVA.gov. 21 million BTU annually or 42% represents heating cost
        in Tennessee. At $9.30/MBTU corn heats Tennessee average home for
        about $200 per year. In actual experiences, one Model 7100
        Amaizablaze can fully heat a two heat pump, three story, log home in
        east Tennessee for about $200 per year if one shops the local farm
        for corn. Turkey or deer corn at Xmart may cost twice that amount.
        Save the local corn farm and save on heating cost by shopping for
        corn locally.
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