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Spritz gebachens

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  • wheezul@canby.com
    I m wondering about Rontzier s recipes for Spritz gebacken and am trying to understand how they were made. Modern spritz are kind of a soft dough forced
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 16, 2010
      I'm wondering about Rontzier's recipes for Spritz gebacken and am trying
      to understand how they were made. Modern spritz are kind of a soft dough
      forced through a press. Was something similar done in period? What is
      the difference between a straublein and spritzkuchen since they both seem
      related in the definitions in the Grimm worterbuch? Generally in my mind
      a strauben has a runnier dough that drips into the pan, but Rontzier says
      to make as stiff dough (see later below).

      As an implement Grimm's worterbuch:
      als küchengerät, mehlspritze, sipho farinarius, quibus spirae crocatae,
      sive scribitae striatae, die spritzküchlein, efflantur. STIELER 2084,
      küchleinspritze, schizzatoio da bozzolaio. KRAMER deutsch-ital. dict. 2
      (1702), 895b, nudelspritze, schizzatoio da vermicellini ò fidelini.
      ebenda, butterspritze, schizzatoio da butiro fresco. ebenda, 'spritze,
      ist ein von blech hol getriebenes oder von holtz gedrehetes instrument,
      so die köche in ihren küchen nöthig haben, als da ist, spritze zu
      spritzkuchen, spritze zu würsten, u. d. g.' AMARANTHES (1715) 1892, die
      spritzen der köche zu spritzkuchen. ADELUNG: gebackene spritzkuchen,
      machet den teig gleich als bey vorhergehenden schnee-ballen, ab, bringet
      solchen in die darzu verfertigten spritzen, die forne einen stern haben
      musz. AMARANTHES (1715) 635. (Note bozzolaio from a different thread on
      pepper cakes some here may have been reading on Scacooks list).

      Is this a funnel or more like a sieve device or yet a type of pot/pan?

      Rontzier's recipe(s)
      Spritz gebacken
      Mann mach einen steiffen Deig von Mehl unnd heisser Kappaunenbruh, stost
      ihn mit Eyerdottern gahr wol in Morsel / lest ihn weiss oder macht ihn
      gelb / thut zerschmultzen Buttern und eyerdotter darein / thut ihn darnach
      in eine Spritz mit ein wenig Weins und lests gahr werden.
      [One makes a stiff dough of flour and hot capaun brothe, grinds into it
      with eggyolks very well in the mortar / keep it white or make in yellow /
      put in melted butter and eggyolks thereto / put it then next into a spritz
      with a little wine and let it puff up.

      Mann kan den Deig auch wol mit Zucker oder Parmasanskese abmachen / auch
      wol mit zerstossem Aniss oder allein mit Wein / etc.
      [One can the dough as well with sugar or parmasan cheese make / as well as
      with ground anise or alone with wine / etc.]

      Mann zerstost frische Kese dar Flot in gethan ist und ein wenig trucken
      geworden sein mit Mehl / Eyerdottern unnd ein wenig Salz in einem Morsel /
      beckts in einer Spritz mit Buttern und bestrewet sie mit Zucker wenn man
      sie wil zum tisch geben.
      [One grinds fresh cheese that cream in [which it] was made and a bit dry
      made with flour egg yolks and a bit of salt in a mortar / bake it in a
      spritz with butter and strew it with sugar when one will bring it to the
      table.]

      It's hard to get an exact picture of what is happening without knowing
      what a spritz is, but here it looks like the item might be baked/fried in
      the spritz.

      Any thoughts on my spritzy-ditzy question?

      Katherine B
    • jillwheezul
      I see that Spritz directions include the use of a pastry bag, which makes sense. But baking in a spritz still is a question for me. Katherine B.
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 30, 2010
        I see that Spritz directions include the use of a pastry bag, which makes sense. But baking "in" a spritz still is a question for me.


        Katherine B.


        > It's hard to get an exact picture of what is happening without knowing
        > what a spritz is, but here it looks like the item might be baked/fried in
        > the spritz.
        >
        > Any thoughts on my spritzy-ditzy question?
        >
        > Katherine B
        >
      • Sharon Palmer
        ... Perhaps some kind of extruder, like is used for modern Spritz cookies. I looked through the pictures I have of period kitchens and tools, I didn t find
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 30, 2010
          >I see that Spritz directions include the use of a pastry bag, which
          >makes sense. But baking "in" a spritz still is a question for me.

          Perhaps some kind of extruder, like is used for modern Spritz
          cookies. I looked through the pictures I have of period kitchens and
          tools, I didn't find one, but it is possible.

          Here is a picture of one used for Indian cooking.. nothing that
          couldnt be made in period.
          http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3084/2434540079_d2dba01aca.jpg

          Ranvaig
        • wheezul@canby.com
          Have you noted other instances of use of a pastry bag in Rumpolt or other 16th century sources? It seems like it would be easy enough to use a bag to make
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 30, 2010
            Have you noted other instances of use of a pastry bag in Rumpolt or other
            16th century sources? It seems like it would be easy enough to use a bag
            to make these things.

            Last weekend we did a demo at a local hotel of period cooking. We made
            gefüllte oblaten using Wecker's almond lebkuchen recipe. Basically it was
            two gingerbread type wafers (fairly hard) with an almond paste filling
            dipped in almond based funnel cake batter and deep fried and then
            sprinkled with sugar for additional plumping of the waistline. The
            lebkuchen softens in the frying and they have the Very very nummy and
            addicting - they now have now the nick name "crack". The populace
            snatched up the samples.

            We also did waffles based on Wecker's almond recipe. Also quite well
            received. The funnel cakes needed a funnel with a bigger hole, or a bowl
            with multiple holes so we're going to try a "take two" on producing them.
            They do not work in a kettle - they break apart so a shallower pan was
            needed.

            I put together a funnel cake recipe book and wrote a brief history. It
            was a lot of fun :) I ran across some recipes for streutz (I think they
            were) which sound a lot like the spritz-type gebachens.

            Katherine (who is easily excitable by cookie-like substances)

            >>I see that Spritz directions include the use of a pastry bag, which
            >>makes sense. But baking "in" a spritz still is a question for me.
            >
            > Perhaps some kind of extruder, like is used for modern Spritz
            > cookies. I looked through the pictures I have of period kitchens and
            > tools, I didn't find one, but it is possible.
            >
            > Here is a picture of one used for Indian cooking.. nothing that
            > couldnt be made in period.
            > http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3084/2434540079_d2dba01aca.jpg
            >
            > Ranvaig
            >
          • Sharon Palmer
            ... Sorry no. Funnel cake things poured through a pot with a hole. And a brass mold that you dip in butter, then in batter, then put back in the butter to
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 30, 2010
              >Have you noted other instances of use of a pastry bag in Rumpolt or other
              >16th century sources? It seems like it would be easy enough to use a bag
              >to make these things.

              Sorry no. Funnel cake things poured through a pot with a hole. And
              a brass mold that you dip in butter, then in batter, then put back in
              the butter to fry it. My mother in law used to make those for
              Christmas.

              >We also did waffles based on Wecker's almond recipe. Also quite well
              >received. The funnel cakes needed a funnel with a bigger hole, or a bowl
              >with multiple holes so we're going to try a "take two" on producing them.
              >They do not work in a kettle - they break apart so a shallower pan was
              >needed.

              Everything sounds yummy. What was the recipe? I've been meaning to
              make funnel cakes from the Rumpolt recipe.

              >I put together a funnel cake recipe book and wrote a brief history. It
              >was a lot of fun :) I ran across some recipes for streutz (I think they
              >were) which sound a lot like the spritz-type gebachens.

              Would you share your book?

              Ranvaig
            • wheezul@canby.com
              I just uploaded a pdf copy of what I have done so far in the files section called strauben first draft. It surely needs more work in the footnote category and
              Message 6 of 6 , Apr 30, 2010
                I just uploaded a pdf copy of what I have done so far in the files section
                called strauben first draft. It surely needs more work in the footnote
                category and I hope I have at least cited everyone I've quoted. Give me a
                poke if I have made egregious omissions or errors because it isn't my
                intent! Basically I put it together so we could have a repetoire of
                source recipes to try for the demo with thoughts of using an improved
                version for documentation if I was going to put them into a contest or
                something.

                At the demo we tried the Wecker almond one, a wine/flour based one and the
                parsley based one.

                I've gotta stop reading about them now - I'm getting hungry!

                Katherine

                >>Have you noted other instances of use of a pastry bag in Rumpolt or other
                >>16th century sources? It seems like it would be easy enough to use a bag
                >>to make these things.
                >
                > Sorry no. Funnel cake things poured through a pot with a hole. And
                > a brass mold that you dip in butter, then in batter, then put back in
                > the butter to fry it. My mother in law used to make those for
                > Christmas.
                >
                >>We also did waffles based on Wecker's almond recipe. Also quite well
                >>received. The funnel cakes needed a funnel with a bigger hole, or a bowl
                >>with multiple holes so we're going to try a "take two" on producing them.
                >>They do not work in a kettle - they break apart so a shallower pan was
                >>needed.
                >
                > Everything sounds yummy. What was the recipe? I've been meaning to
                > make funnel cakes from the Rumpolt recipe.
                >
                >>I put together a funnel cake recipe book and wrote a brief history. It
                >>was a lot of fun :) I ran across some recipes for streutz (I think they
                >>were) which sound a lot like the spritz-type gebachens.
                >
                > Would you share your book?
                >
                > Ranvaig
                >
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