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The difference between a julep and a syrup?

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  • wheezul@canby.com
    Hi, I ve run across a couple of instances of the word julep in the recipes I am working through. Sometimes the instructions say julep or syrup. Does anyone
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 12, 2010
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      Hi,

      I've run across a couple of instances of the word julep in the recipes I
      am working through. Sometimes the instructions say julep or syrup. Does
      anyone have any hints for me about the differences between the two?

      Thank you,

      Katherine
    • lilinah@earthlink.net
      ... Syrup comes from sharab (Arabic sing., sharbat pl.; in Turkish it became sherbet). A sharbat is a syrup made of any of a number of items, drunk mixed with
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 12, 2010
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        Katherine wrote:
        >I've run across a couple of instances of the word julep in the recipes I
        >am working through. Sometimes the instructions say julep or syrup. Does
        >anyone have any hints for me about the differences between the two?

        Syrup comes from sharab (Arabic sing., sharbat pl.; in Turkish it
        became sherbet). A sharbat is a syrup made of any of a number of
        items, drunk mixed with water. There are also syrups/sharbat, such as
        those made of fruit juices, of herbs, of flowers, and of mixed herbs
        and spices. See the anonymous Andalusian, last or nearly last
        chapter, for a number of recipes.

        Sherbets made in the Sultans palace in Costantiniye (Constantinople,
        now Istanbul) in the 15th through 17th centuries included:

        Sweet Apple sharbat
        Sour Apple sharbat
        Arab Sharbat (with spices)
        Bitter Orange sharbat
        Sour Cherry Sharbat
        Date Palm Flower Sharbat
        Date sharbat
        Grape sharbat
        Honey sharbat
        Lavender Sharbat
        Lemon sharbat
        Mint sharbat
        Mulberry Sharbat
        Peach Sharbat
        Pear sharbat
        Sweet Pomegranate sharbat
        Sour Pomegranate sharbat
        Sugar Sharbat
        Rose sharbat
        Tamarind Sharbat
        Violet Sharbat
        Water Lily sharbat

        Julab is one kind of sharab/syrup. The word derives from the Persian,
        gul, which means flower, especially the rose. The 13th c. anonymous
        Andalusian cookbook gives a recipe for sharab of julab, made by
        cooking sugar and rosewater together to make a syrup. In the SCA
        period Islamic world it is a very specific term. Even today in the
        Middle East julab is made with rosewater, dates, and water and served
        over ice.

        Europeans appear to have borrowed the term julep and used it more
        generically. And borrowed sherbet and applied it specifically to what
        is essentially frozen sharab.

        --
        Urtatim [that's err-tah-TEEM]
        the persona formerly known as Anahita
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