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beans beans the magical fruit....

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  • Anne-Marie Rousseau
    Hello all from Anne-Marie Ranvaig corrects me re: the accurate latin names for peas and beans and such like. Thank you for the correction! Re: roman
    Message 1 of 4 , Jun 14, 2009
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      Hello all from Anne-Marie

      Ranvaig corrects me re: the accurate latin names for peas and beans and such
      like. Thank you for the correction!

      Re: "roman beans"....we need to be careful re: common names. What we call a
      roman bean now may or my not be the same as what THEY called a roman bean.
      We all have our own level of comfort with extrapolative decisions.

      Personally I go with "roman beans are fava beans" mantra until I have
      genetic or pictorial evidence to the contrary. (speaking of which, has
      anyone looked in the tacitum santitas manuscripts yet for pictures of
      "beans"? we can tell a lot from the pod shape, leaf shape, etc?)

      Lastly,Rianvaig tells us about a comparison she did with "white peas"...this
      matches the results I did when I was doing research for an Elizabethan pea
      soup. The recipe says to start with "white 'peas" and I found that if I
      started with dried, whole (skin on) green peas (they looked white) and
      boiled according to the original instructions, the skins floated off (the
      instructions specified to skim them off) and the resulting pea glop was
      indistinguishable from the pea glop I started using modern green split peas.
      Given that, I am feeling comfortable using modern split peas (MUCH less
      expensive than the whole ones I found!)...

      Fun stuff!!!
      --Anne-Marie


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    • Sharon Palmer
      ... I found the white peas (which were yellow inside not green) at an Indian grocery, not very expensive, but hulling them was a major effort (and ruined my
      Message 2 of 4 , Jun 14, 2009
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        >Lastly,Rianvaig tells us about a comparison she did with "white peas"...
        >(MUCH less expensive than the whole ones I found!)...

        I found the white peas (which were yellow inside not green) at an Indian grocery, not very expensive, but hulling them was a major effort (and ruined my favorite red enameled sieve. When I found flecks of red enamel in the sieved peas, I threw out the peas and the sieve, and started over.)

        Ranvaig
      • Anne-Marie Rousseau
        On experiments with peas... Ranveig tells us that she found white peas in her local east Indian grocery and that they were yellow inside. I found my white
        Message 3 of 4 , Jun 15, 2009
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          On experiments with peas...



          Ranveig tells us that she found "white peas" in her local east Indian
          grocery and that they were yellow inside.



          I found my "white peas" in the $$ Indian section of my local upscale grocery
          store and they were green inside. Cool!!



          The recipe for pea soup that I was working on was Elizabethan English and it
          clearly said that you take your white peas and boil them, then you skim. I
          found this worked great at removing the hulls with little to no effort.



          What process did you use that it removed the paint from your colendar???



          --Anne-Marie, who finds all kinds of cool and useful similarities between
          source materials. Yay!



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Sharon Palmer
          ... They were supposed to be pressed through a sieve. I had a wire mesh sieve that was enameled red, and usually used to drain fruit. I was pushing the peas
          Message 4 of 4 , Jun 15, 2009
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            >
            >What process did you use that it removed the paint from your colendar???
            >

            They were supposed to be pressed through a sieve. I had a wire mesh
            sieve that was enameled red, and usually used to drain fruit. I was
            pushing the peas thru with the back of a wooden spoon, when I noticed
            that the red enamel was flaking off a little. If I was making them
            for home I might have just lived with it.. it really wasnt much.. but
            I was making them for an event, so tossed the batch and started over.
            I'd cooked more peas than I needed anyway.

            A food mill would probably be a better tool for the job, one of these
            days, I must get one.

            Ranvaig
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