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translation/interpretation question

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  • Jeremy Fletcher
    A friend gave me five pounds of boar meat (well, wild pig really) and I wanted to try one of the Rumpolt sausage recipes. I decided to use Schweinen 33: Take
    Message 1 of 12 , Sep 28, 2013
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      A friend gave me five pounds of boar meat (well, wild pig really) and I
      wanted to try one of the Rumpolt sausage recipes. I decided to use
      Schweinen 33:

      Take meat from the wild pig/ cut it small/ and take the large intestine
      from the pig/ cut the meat and fat small/ take a stick and pound small/
      cracked pepper/ that it falls apart/ put it with the salt/ and rub the
      pork meat with it/ (and presumably stuff into the intestine) tie the
      intestine tightly over over each other/ then hang it up/ and let become
      dry/ put it in no heat/ but just that the smoke hits. And when you want
      to keep (store) it long/ especially in a company/ then smear it with a
      little olive oil/ enclose it in a barrel/ then you can take out one
      after the other/ and let boil an hour three or four/ until the sausage
      is large/ let them become cold/then you can eat them/ as long as you
      will keep (store) them.

      Pretty straightforward and it's cold-smoking now. But then there's the
      end bit about in a company smearing with olive oil and enclosing in a
      barrel. There's another recipe that says something similar for a
      venison sausage (Hirsch 25): However if you are in a crew/ then spread
      it with olive oil/ and enclose in barrels/ then they keep a year or three.

      My initial thought is that this is for military companies, who need
      long-lasting travel food. But am I reading it right to essentially
      confit them in olive oil after they've been cold-smoked and dry-cured?

      Thanks!
      Wulfric, curious to try more of the German sausage recipes
    • Sharon Palmer
      Sorry, I was away from home and email for a few days. I m not sure I d interpret it as confit, because it says a little olive oil . I m no expert on sausage
      Message 2 of 12 , Sep 29, 2013
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        Sorry, I was away from home and email for a few days. I'm not sure
        I'd interpret it as confit, because it says "a little olive oil".
        I'm no expert on sausage though. What do others think? Gwen Cat,
        are you listening?
        Ranvaig

        >A friend gave me five pounds of boar meat (well, wild pig really) and I
        >wanted to try one of the Rumpolt sausage recipes. I decided to use
        >Schweinen 33:
        >
        >Take meat from the wild pig/ cut it small/ and take the large intestine
        >from the pig/ cut the meat and fat small/ take a stick and pound small/
        >cracked pepper/ that it falls apart/ put it with the salt/ and rub the
        >pork meat with it/ (and presumably stuff into the intestine) tie the
        >intestine tightly over over each other/ then hang it up/ and let become
        >dry/ put it in no heat/ but just that the smoke hits. And when you want
        >to keep (store) it long/ especially in a company/ then smear it with a
        >little olive oil/ enclose it in a barrel/ then you can take out one
        >after the other/ and let boil an hour three or four/ until the sausage
        >is large/ let them become cold/then you can eat them/ as long as you
        >will keep (store) them.
        >
        >Pretty straightforward and it's cold-smoking now. But then there's the
        >end bit about in a company smearing with olive oil and enclosing in a
        >barrel. There's another recipe that says something similar for a
        >venison sausage (Hirsch 25): However if you are in a crew/ then spread
        >it with olive oil/ and enclose in barrels/ then they keep a year or three.
        >
        >My initial thought is that this is for military companies, who need
        >long-lasting travel food. But am I reading it right to essentially
        >confit them in olive oil after they've been cold-smoked and dry-cured?
        >
        >Thanks!
        > Wulfric, curious to try more of the German sausage recipes
        >
      • Jeremy Fletcher
        then smear it with a little olive oil/ enclose it in a barrel . A similar venison sausage recipe (Hirsch 25) says However if you are in a crew/then spread
        Message 3 of 12 , Sep 30, 2013
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          "then smear it with a little olive oil/ enclose it in a barrel".  A similar venison sausage recipe (Hirsch 25) says "However if you are in a crew/then spread it with olive oil/ and enclose in barrels/ then they keep a year or three."

          I initially thought about wiping the surfaces with a bit of oil before hanging to dry-cure, but I've gone back to the submerge and store in oil theory.  If it's being done as travel food, you would want to use as little as possible (while keeping an anaerobic seal) for weight reasons.  I'm using more than I'd prefer to because I have a larger crock than the three sausages I'm immersing.

          Several people have pointed out the botulism risk inherent in this method.  However: I'm using curing salt, the sausages are cold-smoked, and the recipe itself says to boil "for an hour to four" which if done properly should kill off any toxin that has been produced.
              Wulfric

          On 9/30/2013 3:32 AM, cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com wrote:
          Cooking Rumpolt

          1 New Message

          Digest #372
          1a

          Message

          Sun Sep 29, 2013 3:13 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

          "Sharon Palmer" ranvaig

          Sorry, I was away from home and email for a few days. I'm not sure
          I'd interpret it as confit, because it says "a little olive oil".
          I'm no expert on sausage though. What do others think? Gwen Cat,
          are you listening?
          Ranvaig

        • Sharon Palmer
          The original and translation Schweinen 33. Nim~ Fleisch vom wilden Schwein/ schneidts klein/ vnd nim~ die grosten Därm vom Schwein/ schneidt das Fleisch vnnd
          Message 4 of 12 , Sep 30, 2013
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            The original and translation

            Schweinen 33. Nim~ Fleisch vom wilden Schwein/
            schneidts klein/ vnd nim~ die grosten Därm vom
            Schwein/ schneidt das Fleisch vnnd Feißt klein/
            nim~ ein Holtz/ vnd zerstoß klein/ klopff
            Pfeffer/ daß er voneinander fellt/ thu jn vnter
            das Saltz/ vnd reib das Schweinen Fleisch darmit/

            33. Take meat from the wild pig/ cut it small/
            and take the large intestine from the pig/ cut
            the meat and fat small/ take a stick and pound
            small/ crack pepper/ that it falls apart/ put it
            with the salt/ and rub the pork meat with it (and
            presumably stuff into the intestine)/

            bindt den Darm fest vbereinander/ hengs darnach
            auff/ vnnd laß trucken werden/ thu es in kein
            Hitz/ sondern nur da der Rauch hinschlegt. Vnd
            wenn du es lang wilt behalten/ sonderlich in
            einer Besatzung/ so schmiers ein wenig mit
            Baumöl/ schlags in ein Faß eyn/

            tie the intestine tightly over over each other/
            then hang it up/ and let become dry/ put it in no
            heat/ but just that the smoke hits. And when you
            want to keep (store) it long/ especially in a
            company/ then smear it with a little olive oil/
            enclose it in a barrel/

            so kanstu ein nach der andern herauß nemmen/ vnnd
            sieden lassen ein stundt drey oder vier/ darnach
            die Wurst groß ist/ laß sie kalt werden/ so
            kanstu davon essen/ wie lang du es behalten wilt.

            then you can take out one after the other/ and
            let boil an hour three or four/ because?? the
            sausage is large/ let them become cold/then you
            can eat them/ as long as you will keep (store)
            them.

            Ranvaig
          • Sharon Palmer
            Cat wanted to see the original and said It specified ein wenig that is a little I would think a barrel would take a lot but I don t know and yes it says
            Message 5 of 12 , Sep 30, 2013
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              Cat wanted to see the original and said
              "It specified ein wenig that is a little I would
              think a barrel would take a lot but I don't know
              and yes it says smear not pour or lay in. ...
              feel free to forward or i will try to get to it
              later now that the original is there"

              Ranvaig

              >Vnd
              >wenn du es lang wilt behalten/ sonderlich in
              >einer Besatzung/ so schmiers ein wenig mit
              >Baumöl/ schlags in ein Faß eyn/
              >
              >And when you
              >want to keep (store) it long/ especially in a
              >company/ then smear it with a little olive oil/
              >enclose it in a barrel/
              >
              >so kanstu ein nach der andern herauß nemmen/ vnnd
              >sieden lassen ein stundt drey oder vier/ darnach
              >die Wurst groß ist/ laß sie kalt werden/ so
              >kanstu davon essen/ wie lang du es behalten wilt.
              >
              >then you can take out one after the other/ and
              >let boil an hour three or four/ because?? the
              >sausage is large/ let them become cold/then you
              >can eat them/ as long as you will keep (store)
              >them.
              >
              >Ranvaig
              >
            • xina007eu
              Strictly speaking, schmiers ein wenig mit Baumöl/ means rub it a bit with olive oil , not rub it with a little olive oil . There s no specification of
              Message 6 of 12 , Oct 2, 2013
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                Strictly speaking, " schmiers ein wenig mit Baumöl/" means "rub it a bit with olive oil", not "rub it with a little olive oil". There's no specification of the amount of oil you are supposed to use.

                 

                Best regards,

                 

                Christina



                ---In cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com, <cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                The original and translation

                Schweinen 33. Nim~ Fleisch vom wilden Schwein/
                schneidts klein/ vnd nim~ die grosten Därm vom
                Schwein/ schneidt das Fleisch vnnd Feißt klein/
                nim~ ein Holtz/ vnd zerstoß klein/ klopff
                Pfeffer/ daß er voneinander fellt/ thu jn vnter
                das Saltz/ vnd reib das Schweinen Fleisch darmit/

                33. Take meat from the wild pig/ cut it small/
                and take the large intestine from the pig/ cut
                the meat and fat small/ take a stick and pound
                small/ crack pepper/ that it falls apart/ put it
                with the salt/ and rub the pork meat with it (and
                presumably stuff into the intestine)/

                bindt den Darm fest vbereinander/ hengs darnach
                auff/ vnnd laß trucken werden/ thu es in kein
                Hitz/ sondern nur da der Rauch hinschlegt. Vnd
                wenn du es lang wilt behalten/ sonderlich in
                einer Besatzung/ so schmiers ein wenig mit
                Baumöl/ schlags in ein Faß eyn/

                tie the intestine tightly over over each other/
                then hang it up/ and let become dry/ put it in no
                heat/ but just that the smoke hits. And when you
                want to keep (store) it long/ especially in a
                company/ then smear it with a little olive oil/
                enclose it in a barrel/

                so kanstu ein nach der andern herauß nemmen/ vnnd
                sieden lassen ein stundt drey oder vier/ darnach
                die Wurst groß ist/ laß sie kalt werden/ so
                kanstu davon essen/ wie lang du es behalten wilt.

                then you can take out one after the other/ and
                let boil an hour three or four/ because?? the
                sausage is large/ let them become cold/then you
                can eat them/ as long as you will keep (store)
                them.

                Ranvaig
              • Channon Mondoux
                I was reading this posting http://forums.egullet.org/topic/125619-green-mold-on-dry-cured-sausages/ about Italian sausages and mold and wiping them down with
                Message 7 of 12 , Oct 2, 2013
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                  I was reading this posting http://forums.egullet.org/topic/125619-green-mold-on-dry-cured-sausages/
                  about Italian sausages and mold and wiping  them down with oil- this seems to be what happens when you store a sausage (please note proper temp and humidity are pertinent to a healthy cured sausage) it WILL turn moldy and should and then you wipe them down with oil when you store it- and then again before eating you should be washing it.

                  Read the whole post and you'll get what I mean. There is a natural fermentation happening along with a natural mold growth on the outside of the sausage- You MUST also use proper levels of Nitrates to prevent botulism.

                  --
                  Channon Mondoux

                  "If you endeavor to live the life of which you have imagined, you will find success unknown in common hours."  H.D. Thoreau

                  269-547-0339



                • Cat .
                  FANTASTIC!   and good point about wiping it a little with olive oil instead of wiping it with a little olive oil . Channon, I had not heard of the
                  Message 8 of 12 , Oct 2, 2013
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                    FANTASTIC!  
                    and good point about 'wiping it a little with olive oil' instead of 'wiping it with a little olive oil'.
                    Channon, I had not heard of the technique but it makes much more sense to me than submerging it in olive oil.

                    Ranvaig, I dont recall Rumpolt ever mentioning nitrates, (though I use curing salt when I made modern cold smoked pork loins...)  What do you think, is it just assumed? Am I not seeing something?

                    Curious
                    Gwen pre coffee... neeeeeeed coffee Cat


                    From: Channon Mondoux <channonmondoux@...>
                    To: cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, October 2, 2013 7:27 AM
                    Subject: [cooking_rumpolt] Re: translation/interpretation question

                     
                    I was reading this posting http://forums.egullet.org/topic/125619-green-mold-on-dry-cured-sausages/
                    about Italian sausages and mold and wiping  them down with oil- this seems to be what happens when you store a sausage (please note proper temp and humidity are pertinent to a healthy cured sausage) it WILL turn moldy and should and then you wipe them down with oil when you store it- and then again before eating you should be washing it.

                    Read the whole post and you'll get what I mean. There is a natural fermentation happening along with a natural mold growth on the outside of the sausage- You MUST also use proper levels of Nitrates to prevent botulism.

                    --
                    Channon Mondoux

                    "If you endeavor to live the life of which you have imagined, you will find success unknown in common hours."  H.D. Thoreau

                    269-547-0339





                  • Sharon Palmer
                    Correction noted, thank you, Christina. ... It is possible he mentions nitrate, but I didn t recognize the reference. I ll double check the recipes. ...
                    Message 9 of 12 , Oct 2, 2013
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                      Correction noted, thank you, Christina.

                      >FANTASTIC!
                      >and good point about 'wiping it a little with olive oil' instead of
                      >'wiping it with a little olive oil'.
                      >Channon, I had not heard of the technique but it makes much more
                      >sense to me than submerging it in olive oil.

                      It is possible he mentions nitrate, but I didn't recognize the
                      reference. I'll double check the recipes.

                      >
                      >Ranvaig, I dont recall Rumpolt ever mentioning nitrates, (though I
                      >use curing salt when I made modern cold smoked pork loins...) What
                      >do you think, is it just assumed? Am I not seeing something?

                      Wonderful article!

                      >I was reading this posting
                      >http://forums.egullet.org/topic/125619-green-mold-on-dry-cured-sausages/


                      Ranvaig
                    • cfaolbran
                      ... While sodium nitrite is effective at preventing botlism it isn t the only thing that does, it works in concert with the fermentation process, smoking and
                      Message 10 of 12 , Oct 3, 2013
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                        ---In cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com, <cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                         
                        >It is possible he mentions nitrate, but I didn't recognize the
                        reference. I'll double check the recipes.

                        It is very rare to see nitrites referenced. Off the top of my head, I can't think of any actually. When you look at the composition of the salt available in this period and earlier, in particularly quarried salts, nitrites and nitrates occur naturally in semi-useful quantities. Cold smoking introduces more of each but penetration is dependant on moisture etc. etc. Saltpeter (potassium nitrate) was very occasionally referenced as a cure compound though the source is escaping me at the moment - chime in if you happen to recall!
                         
                        While sodium nitrite is effective at preventing botlism it isn't the only thing that does, it works in concert with the fermentation process, smoking and salting.  
                      • cfaolbran
                        Sorry - forgot to identify myself! (Kolbrunna) ... While sodium nitrite is effective at preventing botlism it isn t the only thing that does, it works in
                        Message 11 of 12 , Oct 3, 2013
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                          Sorry - forgot to identify myself! (Kolbrunna) 

                          ...
                           
                          While sodium nitrite is effective at preventing botlism it isn't the only thing that does, it works in concert with the fermentation process, smoking and salting.  
                        • Cat .
                          Thanks, wondered if it was something like this (where it was naturally occurring)  Of course now I want to make and smoke sausages (and I have too little time
                          Message 12 of 12 , Oct 3, 2013
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                            Thanks, wondered if it was something like this (where it was naturally occurring) 
                            Of course now I want to make and smoke sausages (and I have too little time and too many things on my plate... MUST get that German Xmas feast on paper so I can get it published and pre-sales started...

                            Gwen What was I thinking Cat


                            From: "d_rakowski@..." <d_rakowski@...>
                            To: cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Thursday, October 3, 2013 9:32 AM
                            Subject: RE: Re: [cooking_rumpolt] Re: translation/interpretation question

                             
                             

                            ---In cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com, <cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                             
                            >It is possible he mentions nitrate, but I didn't recognize the
                            reference. I'll double check the recipes.

                            It is very rare to see nitrites referenced. Off the top of my head, I can't think of any actually. When you look at the composition of the salt available in this period and earlier, in particularly quarried salts, nitrites and nitrates occur naturally in semi-useful quantities. Cold smoking introduces more of each but penetration is dependant on moisture etc. etc. Saltpeter (potassium nitrate) was very occasionally referenced as a cure compound though the source is escaping me at the moment - chime in if you happen to recall!
                             
                            While sodium nitrite is effective at preventing botlism it isn't the only thing that does, it works in concert with the fermentation process, smoking and salting.  


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