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Pleßlein

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  • Sharon Palmer
    I got this message from Katharina, that Pleßlein might be European Coot, modernly Blässhuhn, and I think that seems correct. ... It s been a while since I
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 5, 2013
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      I got this message from Katharina, that Pleßlein
      might be European Coot, modernly Blässhuhn, and I
      think that seems correct.

      >Just a thought:
      >Could it be the Eurasian coot?
      ><http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_Coot>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eurasian_Coot
      >
      >This was eaten and does taste rather brackish
      >and fishy as hunters and my mom told me. It is
      >still shot sometimes today and you have to water
      >it and remove ALL fat before you can do anything
      >with it.


      It's been a while since I uploaded, so I put up a
      new version tonight. Besides this, no new
      translation, but there are quite a few small
      corrections.

      Ranvaig
    • Antonia di Benedetto Calvo
      ... I had to look that one up... it looks a lot like a pukeko that hasn t had a chance to take off its slippers or freshen up :-) -- Antonia di Benedetto Calvo
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 6, 2013
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        On 6/03/2013 6:27 p.m., Sharon Palmer wrote:
        > I got this message from Katharina, that Pleßlein
        > might be European Coot, modernly Blässhuhn, and I
        > think that seems correct.

        I had to look that one up... it looks a lot like a pukeko that hasn't
        had a chance to take off its slippers or freshen up :-)

        --
        Antonia di Benedetto Calvo
        -------------------------------------
        Saccharum pergratum. Villum lubricum.
      • Sharon Palmer
        I had to look up pukeko. Coot and pukeko are both Rails, so there is a family resemblance. P - B is a very common change in German, a A umlat or ä to E is
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 6, 2013
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          I had to look up pukeko. Coot and pukeko are both
          Rails, so there is a family resemblance.

          P -> B is a very common change in German, a A
          umlat or ä to E is also common in Rumpolt. The
          dictionary even lists the spelling Bleßhuhn. So
          Pleß and Bläss are the same word.

          Here is the woodcut from Rumpolt. It appears to
          be a waterbird, but not detailed enough to be
          specific. My notes said that it appeared
          "duckish". It is grouped with recipes for
          several kinds of duck.
          http://diglib.hab.de/wdb.php?pointer=249&dir=drucke%2F2-3-oec-2f

          Ranvaig


          >I had to look that one up... it looks a lot like a pukeko that hasn't
          >had a chance to take off its slippers or freshen up :-)
          >
          >Antonia di Benedetto Calvo
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