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What to do with Sausage: Tourney Dish

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  • Mercy
    So, I made a period sausage (beef, pork and bacon) recipe and now I am trying to find a period dish that I can use it in. Any suggestions? Looking for a
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 3, 2013
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      So, I made a period sausage (beef, pork and bacon) recipe and now I am trying to find a period dish that I can use it in. Any suggestions? Looking for a tourney dish type recipe.

      I've seen a few salads... not sure if that is the best thing for me. Suggestions welcome.

      Thank you!

      --Mercy
    • Johnna Holloway
      Most people seem to make sausages to eat on their own perhaps with some sort of mustards or with bread. After some searching I came across this recipe from
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 3, 2013
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        Most people seem to make sausages to eat on their own perhaps with some sort of mustards or with bread.

        After some searching I came across this recipe from OldCook. http://www.oldcook.com/en/cooking-recipes_medieval
        Sausages with apples, cinnamon and nutmeg

        from Saulcisses en potage, Lancelot de Casteau,
        Ouverture de cuisine, 1585.

        Ingredients (1 tsp = 1 teaspoon)
        4 smoked sausages (about 700g)
        1,1 kg of tart apples
        340g onions
        40g butter
        3 tablespoons of sugar (30 g maxi)
        200g of red wine
        3/4tsp cinnamon
        1/2tsp nutmeg
        pinch of salt.

        Recipe (cuisson = 3/4 h)
        Brown the sausages with butter (reserve), brown the onions which have been cut into rings (reserve), and brown the apples which have been cut into pieces.

        Add the sausages, apples, and onions in a pot with wine, sugar, salt, and spices. Cover and cook for 30 min.

        This is an excerpt from Ouverture de Cuisine
        (France, 1604 - Daniel Myers, trans.)
        The original source can be found at MedievalCookery.com

        Sausages in Pottage. Take sausages, & fry them in butter, then take four or five peeled apples & cut into small quarters, & four or five onions cut into rings, & fry them in butter, & put all of them into a pot with the sausages, & put therein nutmeg, cinnamon, with red or white wine, sugar, & let them then all stew.

        Johnnae


        On Mar 3, 2013, at 6:52 PM, Mercy wrote:

        > So, I made a period sausage (beef, pork and bacon) recipe and now I am trying to find a period dish that I can use it in. Any suggestions? Looking for a tourney dish type recipe.
        >
        > I've seen a few salads... not sure if that is the best thing for me. Suggestions welcome.
        >
        > Thank you!
        >
        > --Mercy
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sharon Palmer
        ... I am so much NOT a sausage expert! I m mostly vegetarian, and haven t even tasted sausage since 1975. Mercy told me the recipe involved was Welserin 23
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 3, 2013
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          >So, I made a period sausage (beef, pork and bacon) recipe and now I
          >am trying to find a period dish that I can use it in. Any
          >suggestions? Looking for a tourney dish type recipe.
          >
          >I've seen a few salads... not sure if that is the best thing for me.
          >Suggestions welcome.
          >
          >Thank you!
          >

          I am so much NOT a sausage expert! I'm mostly vegetarian, and
          haven't even tasted sausage since 1975.

          Mercy told me the recipe involved was
          Welserin 23 If you would make a good sausage for a salad
          Then take ten pounds of pork and five pounds of beef, always two
          parts pork to one part of beef. That would be fifteen pounds. To that
          one should take eight ounces of salt and two and one half ounces of
          pepper, which should be coarsely ground, and when the meat is
          chopped, put into it at first two pounds of bacon, diced. According
          to how fat the pork is, one can use less or more, take the bacon from
          the back and not from the belly. And the sausages should be firmly
          stuffed. The sooner they are dried the better. Hang them in the
          parlor or in the kitchen, but not in the smoke and not near the oven,
          so that the bacon does not melt. This should be done during the
          crescent moon, and fill with the minced meat well and firmly, then
          the sausages will remain good for a long while. Each sausage should
          be tied above and below and also fasten a ribbon on both ends with
          which they should be hung up, and every two days they should be
          turned, upside down, and when they are fully dried out, wrap them in
          a cloth and lay them in a box.

          So dried but not smoked. It is different than Zervelat, bratwurst,
          and liverwurst which have their own recipes.

          Did you dry it enough to store without refrigeration? Is this a
          sausage which can be eaten without further cooking? If so, then
          serve it simply sliced, perhaps with sauerkraut or green cabbage.


          Rumpolt has many "wurst" recipes, but most of the menu "serving
          suggestions" call for bratwurst, not dried sausage.

          Ochsen 61 for a dried, smoked sausage says
          If you would rather boil them/ then let them boil three hours/ and
          not longer/ let them become cold/ and cut them round/ or how you will
          have them/ and pull the intestine away from it/ when you want to eat
          it/ then you will learn/ what is a good dish it is/ for a poor
          fellow/ and also for a great lord. Then one can eat from it four or
          six weeks/ as long as you want/ and as long as they last.

          Hirsch 25. for Italian Zurwanada (Italian sausage) from the deer is
          also smoked.

          When they are thick and large/ then you must let them simmer an hour
          four or five/ however that you do not over cook them/ let them become
          cool/ then you can eat them/ and you can also keep them a week six or
          seven/ especially in winter/ when you travel over the land/ you can
          cut a piece from it and eat it anytime/ then you taste it after a
          good drink. And such sausages one must make in winter/ the colder it
          is/ the better it is. Is also good for a poor soldier/ that must be
          in the field a year and a day/ because the pepper and salt conserve
          it/ becomes good and well tasting. They can also be given for a
          salad/ and when you carve them/ then pull the skin off/ then you will
          see the pepper corns between the red meat/ makes one pleased to eat.

          On the other hand, if it is NOT dried, from the menus I'd suggest

          Bratwurst made in an onion gescharb (sauce).

          Ochsen 74. ...put up sour in onion and apple gescharb sauce. Take
          apple and onion/ chop them together/ and sweat in but/ take it from
          the fire/ and mix it with spices/ pepper/ ginger and saffron/
          dissolve with a beef broth/ pour vinegar to it/ and brown flour in
          it/ put also small raisins under it/ and let simmer/ .../ and put
          them in the gescharb/ and let simmer together/ like this it is well
          tasting.


          Ranvaig
        • Johnna Holloway
          And this is that classic treatment with onions and apples again. Johnnae On Mar 3, 2013, at 8:36 PM, Sharon Palmer wrote:snipped ... [Non-text portions of this
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 3, 2013
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            And this is that classic treatment with onions and apples again.

            Johnnae

            On Mar 3, 2013, at 8:36 PM, Sharon Palmer wrote:snipped
            > On the other hand, if it is NOT dried, from the menus I'd suggest
            >
            > Bratwurst made in an onion gescharb (sauce).
            >
            > Ochsen 74. ...put up sour in onion and apple gescharb sauce. Take
            > apple and onion/ chop them together/ and sweat in but/ take it from
            > the fire/ and mix it with spices/ pepper/ ginger and saffron/
            > dissolve with a beef broth/ pour vinegar to it/ and brown flour in
            > it/ put also small raisins under it/ and let simmer/ .../ and put
            > them in the gescharb/ and let simmer together/ like this it is well
            > tasting.
            >
            > Ranvaig
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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