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Roasting beef

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  • Rebecca Mikkelsen
    I want to prepare a beef roast for my feast and serve it with some sauces--probably horseradish and some kind of mustard. I would like the meat to have
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 3, 2008
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      I want to prepare a beef roast for my feast and serve it with some
      sauces--probably horseradish and some kind of mustard. I would like
      the meat to have somewhat of the flavor of having been cooked over an
      open fire. If I roast the beef in a conventional oven until almost
      done, then put it on a BBQ grill to finish cooking, would I achieve
      somewhat of the kind of flavor I am seeking?

      Rebecca, new to the list
    • tgrcat2001
      Hi Rebecca, For my most recent feast (Caerthe/Outlands 12th night) I had a kitchen with lots of space, but only a single home stove and oven. I got a steal on
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 7, 2008
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        Hi Rebecca,

        For my most recent feast (Caerthe/Outlands 12th night) I had a kitchen
        with lots of space, but only a single home stove and oven. I got a
        steal on top sirloin (black angus even) and seasoned it with salt and
        pepper, threw it on my grill till the outsides were seared then chilled
        and froze them. At the event I took the now thawed again roasts, piled
        them into electric 18 quart roasters (threw garlic in one just cause)
        added some beef broth so the meat would not get too dry or stick, and
        let them roast to internal 140 (though in sitting they got closer to
        medium, instead of the rare I wanted.) They got good reviews, and I
        think you could taste and smell that grill/smoke flavor.

        In Service
        Gwen Cat

        --- In cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com, "Rebecca Mikkelsen"
        <mikkelsen_rebecca@...> wrote:
        >
        > I want to prepare a beef roast for my feast and serve it with some
        > sauces--probably horseradish and some kind of mustard. I would like
        > the meat to have somewhat of the flavor of having been cooked over an
        > open fire. If I roast the beef in a conventional oven until almost
        > done, then put it on a BBQ grill to finish cooking, would I achieve
        > somewhat of the kind of flavor I am seeking?
        >
        > Rebecca, new to the list
        >
      • Rebecca Mikkelsen
        I like the idea of pre-grilling at home so that I don t have to bring the grills to the site. On the other hand, there is nothing that whets the apetite like
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 10, 2008
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          I like the idea of pre-grilling at home so that I don't have to bring
          the grills to the site. On the other hand, there is nothing that
          whets the apetite like the smell of grilling meat!

          Rebecca

          --- In cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com, "tgrcat2001" <grasse@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Hi Rebecca,
          >
          > For my most recent feast (Caerthe/Outlands 12th night) I had a
          kitchen
          > with lots of space, but only a single home stove and oven. I got a
          > steal on top sirloin (black angus even) and seasoned it with salt
          and
          > pepper, threw it on my grill till the outsides were seared then
          chilled
          > and froze them. At the event I took the now thawed again roasts,
          piled
          > them into electric 18 quart roasters (threw garlic in one just
          cause)
          > added some beef broth so the meat would not get too dry or stick,
          and
          > let them roast to internal 140 (though in sitting they got closer
          to
          > medium, instead of the rare I wanted.) They got good reviews, and I
          > think you could taste and smell that grill/smoke flavor.
          >
          > In Service
          > Gwen Cat
          >
          > --- In cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com, "Rebecca Mikkelsen"
          > <mikkelsen_rebecca@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I want to prepare a beef roast for my feast and serve it with
          some
          > > sauces--probably horseradish and some kind of mustard. I would
          like
          > > the meat to have somewhat of the flavor of having been cooked
          over an
          > > open fire. If I roast the beef in a conventional oven until
          almost
          > > done, then put it on a BBQ grill to finish cooking, would I
          achieve
          > > somewhat of the kind of flavor I am seeking?
          > >
          > > Rebecca, new to the list
          > >
          >
        • tgrcat2001
          The roaster ovens set around the hall (so as not to overload any one cirquit) exuded an amazing scent, as did the bread baking in the kitchen. I was tempted
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 10, 2008
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            The roaster ovens set around the hall (so as not to overload any one
            cirquit) exuded an amazing scent, as did the bread baking in the
            kitchen. I was tempted to set someone to standing in the kitchen
            door fannig toward the hall to help whet everyones appetite ;-)

            But yes, for me it was about minimizing what I had to haul to the
            site (in addition to pre cooked and to be cooked foodstuffs, serving
            gear, etc...) And the roasters meant I did not have to wear eau-de-
            BBQ-smoke for the rest of the day (as nice a scent as that is.

            Gwen Cat


            --- In cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com, "Rebecca Mikkelsen"
            <mikkelsen_rebecca@...> wrote:
            >
            > I like the idea of pre-grilling at home so that I don't have to
            bring
            > the grills to the site. On the other hand, there is nothing that
            > whets the apetite like the smell of grilling meat!
            >
            > Rebecca
            >
            > --- In cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com, "tgrcat2001" <grasse@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi Rebecca,
            > >
            > > For my most recent feast (Caerthe/Outlands 12th night) I had a
            > kitchen
            > > with lots of space, but only a single home stove and oven. I got
            a
            > > steal on top sirloin (black angus even) and seasoned it with salt
            > and
            > > pepper, threw it on my grill till the outsides were seared then
            > chilled
            > > and froze them. At the event I took the now thawed again roasts,
            > piled
            > > them into electric 18 quart roasters (threw garlic in one just
            > cause)
            > > added some beef broth so the meat would not get too dry or stick,
            > and
            > > let them roast to internal 140 (though in sitting they got closer
            > to
            > > medium, instead of the rare I wanted.) They got good reviews, and
            I
            > > think you could taste and smell that grill/smoke flavor.
            > >
            > > In Service
            > > Gwen Cat
            > >
            > > --- In cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com, "Rebecca Mikkelsen"
            > > <mikkelsen_rebecca@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I want to prepare a beef roast for my feast and serve it with
            > some
            > > > sauces--probably horseradish and some kind of mustard. I would
            > like
            > > > the meat to have somewhat of the flavor of having been cooked
            > over an
            > > > open fire. If I roast the beef in a conventional oven until
            > almost
            > > > done, then put it on a BBQ grill to finish cooking, would I
            > achieve
            > > > somewhat of the kind of flavor I am seeking?
            > > >
            > > > Rebecca, new to the list
            > > >
            > >
            >
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