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Deckenmilch was RE: [cooking_rumpolt] Reh 11 - 15

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  • wheezul@canby.com
    Ah, found it. I think I need to index this cookbook too. It really helps me find things faster! It s from Staindl available at BSB for download: VD16 S 8513
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 16, 2012
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      Ah, found it. I think I need to index this cookbook too. It really helps
      me find things faster!

      It's from Staindl available at BSB for download:

      VD16 S 8513
      Staindl, Balthasar
      Ein sehr künstlichs und nutzlichs Kochbuch
      Augspurg 1569

      The recipe is on page 39 of the pdf, or in Book 3, chapter lxxvi

      Dockenmilch zumachen.
      lxxvi. So nimb ein güte milch / die new gemolcken sey / vnd
      setz das warm steht / vnd baiß mit einer baiß da man käß mit
      baißt / als groß zu eim viertel milch als ein bon / oder darnach
      die baiß güt ist / so es nun gestehet / so müß mans schön her-
      auß haben mit eim faimlöffel auff ein decken / die da mit stro
      gemacht / stürtz die decken fein zusamen / vnd schwers / so sitzt
      das wasser fein darvon / vnnd stürtz auff ein blat / nimbs an
      orten mit einem messel ab / das fein eben vnd viereckecht auff
      dem blat lig / wie ein lezelten / see zucker darauff.

      To make a Docken Milk
      lxxvi. So take a good milk / that is newly milked / and
      sit it a warm place / and season with a season that one cheese
      with seasons [the coagulant] / as much as for a viertel of milk as a bean
      / or
      according to the goodness of the season / so now it has stood / thus must
      one have thereout cleanly with a skimming spoon onto a cover / that with
      straw
      is made / turn the cover well together / and press / thus sits
      the water well from it / and turn it onto a plate / take from the
      edges with a knife (spelling error?) up / that it lies evenly and square on
      the plate / like a lebkuchen / strew sugar on top.


      Baiß seems hard to me to define - it could be whey or rennet or the author
      just assumed you used whatever you were using to coagulate the milk since
      there are more than one choice. The German food "dictionary" closest
      meaning to what I'm thinking is beißen - which it have a penetrating or
      caustic effect (from Platina).

      Gemolcken throws me for a loop too because I don't know if it means milked
      or newly separated from the whey. I think it makes more sense as milked
      in this case. But it could be a ricotta recipe.

      The straw part is interesting. Compare Cotsgrave's 1611 definintion of
      Jonchée, a soft french cheese still served today:
      A bundle of rushes, also, a greone banke to sit on, or way to goe in,
      strewed with flowers, hearbes, grasse, or green rushes; also, the rushes
      so strewed, also, a green cheese, or fresh cheese made of milke thats
      curdled without any rennet, and served in a fraile or greene rushes,
      also, a handfull of small Ivoirie prickes wherewith maidens use to play.

      Also note the similarity to the word junket. I am certainly open to other
      interpretations.

      Anyway, that's all I got...

      Katherine

      >> Vnnd also macht man
      >>> die DeckenMilch.
      >>
      >>I thought to use set in the context of the last line above, but it also
      >>makes sense to refer back to the pertinent step in the recipe. There's
      >>another 16th century recipe out there for 'docken milch' if I recall
      >>correctly. It might be fun to compare the two recipes. I'll see if I
      >> can
      >>find it.
      >>
      >
      > Yes, Set Milk could work as the dish name. My note just referred to
      > the cloth. I'd love to compare the recipes. I compared it to
      > Junket, but it probably should also be compared to modern quark.
      >
      > Ranvaig
      >
    • Cat .
      only have a second Baizen (maybe misspelled) is etching or acid etching, so I assume it would trace back to an acid of sorts so yes your coagulant purr Cat 
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 16, 2012
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        only have a second
        Baizen (maybe misspelled) is etching or acid etching, so I assume it would trace back to an acid of sorts so yes your coagulant

        purr
        Cat 



        >________________________________
        > From: "wheezul@..." <wheezul@...>
        >To: cooking_rumpolt@yahoogroups.com
        >Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2012 4:19 PM
        >Subject: Deckenmilch was RE: [cooking_rumpolt] Reh 11 - 15
        >
        >

        >Ah, found it. I think I need to index this cookbook too. It really helps
        >me find things faster!
        >
        >It's from Staindl available at BSB for download:
        >
        >VD16 S 8513
        >Staindl, Balthasar
        >Ein sehr künstlichs und nutzlichs Kochbuch
        >Augspurg 1569
        >
        >The recipe is on page 39 of the pdf, or in Book 3, chapter lxxvi
        >
        >Dockenmilch zumachen.
        >lxxvi. So nimb ein güte milch / die new gemolcken sey / vnd
        >setz das warm steht / vnd baiß mit einer baiß da man käß mit
        >baißt / als groß zu eim viertel milch als ein bon / oder darnach
        >die baiß güt ist / so es nun gestehet / so müß mans schön her-
        >auß haben mit eim faimlöffel auff ein decken / die da mit stro
        >gemacht / stürtz die decken fein zusamen / vnd schwers / so sitzt
        >das wasser fein darvon / vnnd stürtz auff ein blat / nimbs an
        >orten mit einem messel ab / das fein eben vnd viereckecht auff
        >dem blat lig / wie ein lezelten / see zucker darauff.
        >
        >To make a Docken Milk
        >lxxvi. So take a good milk / that is newly milked / and
        >sit it a warm place / and season with a season that one cheese
        >with seasons [the coagulant] / as much as for a viertel of milk as a bean
        >/ or
        >according to the goodness of the season / so now it has stood / thus must
        >one have thereout cleanly with a skimming spoon onto a cover / that with
        >straw
        >is made / turn the cover well together / and press / thus sits
        >the water well from it / and turn it onto a plate / take from the
        >edges with a knife (spelling error?) up / that it lies evenly and square on
        >the plate / like a lebkuchen / strew sugar on top.
        >
        >Baiß seems hard to me to define - it could be whey or rennet or the author
        >just assumed you used whatever you were using to coagulate the milk since
        >there are more than one choice. The German food "dictionary" closest
        >meaning to what I'm thinking is beißen - which it have a penetrating or
        >caustic effect (from Platina).
        >
        >Gemolcken throws me for a loop too because I don't know if it means milked
        >or newly separated from the whey. I think it makes more sense as milked
        >in this case. But it could be a ricotta recipe.
        >
        >The straw part is interesting. Compare Cotsgrave's 1611 definintion of
        >Jonchée, a soft french cheese still served today:
        >A bundle of rushes, also, a greone banke to sit on, or way to goe in,
        >strewed with flowers, hearbes, grasse, or green rushes; also, the rushes
        >so strewed, also, a green cheese, or fresh cheese made of milke thats
        >curdled without any rennet, and served in a fraile or greene rushes,
        >also, a handfull of small Ivoirie prickes wherewith maidens use to play.
        >
        >Also note the similarity to the word junket. I am certainly open to other
        >interpretations.
        >
        >Anyway, that's all I got...
        >
        >Katherine
        >
        >>> Vnnd also macht man
        >>>> die DeckenMilch.
        >>>
        >>>I thought to use set in the context of the last line above, but it also
        >>>makes sense to refer back to the pertinent step in the recipe. There's
        >>>another 16th century recipe out there for 'docken milch' if I recall
        >>>correctly. It might be fun to compare the two recipes. I'll see if I
        >>> can
        >>>find it.
        >>>
        >>
        >> Yes, Set Milk could work as the dish name. My note just referred to
        >> the cloth. I'd love to compare the recipes. I compared it to
        >> Junket, but it probably should also be compared to modern quark.
        >>
        >> Ranvaig
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Sharon Palmer
        Rumpolt uses Beißen to mean marinate.. usually overnight in vinegar and salt or just vinegar or just salt. The ENHG defines it as bite. It does make a
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 16, 2012
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          Rumpolt uses Beißen to mean marinate.. usually
          overnight in vinegar and salt or just vinegar or
          just salt. The ENHG defines it as bite.

          It does make a difference if you use rennet or
          acid (vinegar or lemon), they produce different
          cheese. Rennet leaves some of the protein in the
          whey. That's why you can make ricotta with acid
          from the whey left from rennet cheese.

          Ranvaig
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