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The bread recipes

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  • ranvaig@columbus.rr.com
    I have no documentation for these, just decriptions that they are like traditional German bread. Ranvaig Semmel rolls I couldnt find a period German bread
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 24, 2007
      I have no documentation for these, just decriptions that they are like "traditional" German bread.

      Ranvaig

      Semmel rolls
      I couldnt find a period German bread recipe, only for fried buns

      1 T dry yeast, 1 c water, 1 c white flour,
      5 c. white flour, 2 c milk, _ c sugar, 1 tsp salt.
      1 egg, 1 T water

      Mix water and yeast, stir in flour, let proof for 6 hours or more.
      Stir in milk, salt, and sugar. Add the rest of the flour as needed to make a good dough. Knead well. Let rise for 1 hour.
      Knead again and shape the loaves, let rise again for 1 hour.
      Heat the oven and put a pan in the bottom.
      Mix the egg and water and brush the loaves. Put the loaves in the oven and add water to the other pan to make steam.
      Bake in 425° oven for about 20 for small loaves.


      Welserin 85. Wiltú gúte grosse kiechlen bachen wie die semlen/ So nim ain milch, lasß sieden, thu 2 brecklen schmaltz darein/ vnnd saltz aúch darein/ vnnd ain trepfflin wasser aúch darein, rier mell darein, ain leffel oder .2., darnach dú vill machen wilt, mach den taig fein drúcken jn der pfanen/ thú jn jn ain beckin, schlag air darein, bis dú mainst, das er recht se_, nim darnach ain fein eissin leffellin vnnd thú es darmit jn die pfanen, lasß langsam bachen, so send s_ brait/ leg die air jn ain warm wasser.

      If you would bake good large buns like Semmel - Then take milk, bring it to a boil, put two small crumbs of fat into it, also put salt and a small drop of water into it, Stir in flour, one or two spoons, according to how much you will make, make the dough in the pan very dry, put it in a bowl, beat eggs into it, until you think that it is right, take afterwards a small iron spoon and with it put the buns into the pan, let it fry slowly, then they are ready. Lay the eggs in warm water.

      --------------------------------------------
      Ruckenbrot - Rye Bread (Bauernbrot)
      1 1/2 ounces compressed fresh yeast, 1 qt warm water, 2 T white sugar, 4 c all-purpose flour,
      8 c white rye flour, 4 c all-purpose flour, 2 T salt, 1 tsp white sugar, 2 c warm water

      First, make the sourdough starter. Crumble the yeast into a large bowl. Whisk in 1 quart of warm water and 2 tablespoons of sugar until dissolved. The water should be just slightly warmer than body temperature. Gradually whisk in 4 cups of flour, continuing to mix until all lumps are gone. Cover with a dish towel, and let sit for 24 hours at room temperature.
      After 24 hours, stir well, cover, and let stand another 24 hours. It will be a thin, light-colored sourdough which is then ready to use.
      In a large bowl, stir together the rye flour, 4 cups of all-purpose flour, salt and sugar. Mix in the sourdough starter using a wooden spoon, then stir in 2 cups of warm water. I transfer the dough to a heavy duty stand mixer to mix the first couple of minutes, then it can't handle the heavy dough and I start using my hands by turning the dough out onto a floured surface. A clean countertop works best. Knead the dough, adding a few tablespoons of water at a time if it is too stiff. Fold the dough over, pull it apart, whatever you can do to get it kneaded up good. Total kneading time should be 15 to 20 minutes to get a smooth dough. Place the dough in a large bowl, cover, and let rise until doubled, 1 to 2 hours.
      When the dough has risen, scrape it out of the bowl and back onto a floured surface. Knead for about 5 minutes. This is important to activate the gluten. Shape into 1 or 2 long loaves. Place on baking sheets, and let rise for about 1 hour, or until your finger leaves an impression when you poke the bread gently.
      Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F (190 degrees C). Bake the bread for about 45 minutes for 2 loaves, 1 1/2 hours if you made one big loaf. Don't worry if the crust is dark. The bread will be delicious and so will the crust. Cool completely before cutting.
    • Dan Peacock
      Welcome to my Hell. :) Actual bread recipes are few and far between. Having fried bread before one thing I would recommend is that the buns be rather small
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 25, 2007
        Welcome to my Hell. :) Actual bread recipes are few
        and far between. Having fried bread before one thing
        I would recommend is that the buns be rather small or
        you are going to over cook the outside before the
        middle is cooked. Going much above a two inch ball
        doesn't result in anything good. Either it's burned
        or greasy (or both). Yech! :p

        Personal preference: I'd leave out the sugar in the
        sourdough starter. The yeast works on it too quickly
        and can get spent before you need it. However, that
        said, if you are in a cooler, drier climate, the sugar
        can help compensate for that. But, that's the joy of
        bread, it's part chemistry, and part art.

        Richard vanUtrecht (list newbie)

        --- ranvaig@... wrote:

        > I have no documentation for these, just decriptions
        > that they are like "traditional" German bread.
        >
        > Ranvaig
        >
        > Semmel rolls
        > I couldnt find a period German bread recipe, only
        > for fried buns
        >
        > 1 T dry yeast, 1 c water, 1 c white flour,
        > 5 c. white flour, 2 c milk, _ c sugar, 1 tsp salt.
        > 1 egg, 1 T water
        >
        > Mix water and yeast, stir in flour, let proof for 6
        > hours or more.
        > Stir in milk, salt, and sugar. Add the rest of the
        > flour as needed to make a good dough. Knead well.
        > Let rise for 1 hour.
        > Knead again and shape the loaves, let rise again for
        > 1 hour.
        > Heat the oven and put a pan in the bottom.
        > Mix the egg and water and brush the loaves. Put the
        > loaves in the oven and add water to the other pan to
        > make steam.
        > Bake in 425° oven for about 20 for small loaves.
        >
        >
        > Welserin 85. Wiltú gúte grosse kiechlen bachen wie
        > die semlen/ So nim ain milch, lasß sieden, thu 2
        > brecklen schmaltz darein/ vnnd saltz aúch darein/
        > vnnd ain trepfflin wasser aúch darein, rier mell
        > darein, ain leffel oder .2., darnach dú vill machen
        > wilt, mach den taig fein drúcken jn der pfanen/ thú
        > jn jn ain beckin, schlag air darein, bis dú mainst,
        > das er recht se_, nim darnach ain fein eissin
        > leffellin vnnd thú es darmit jn die pfanen, lasß
        > langsam bachen, so send s_ brait/ leg die air jn ain
        > warm wasser.
        >
        > If you would bake good large buns like Semmel - Then
        > take milk, bring it to a boil, put two small crumbs
        > of fat into it, also put salt and a small drop of
        > water into it, Stir in flour, one or two spoons,
        > according to how much you will make, make the dough
        > in the pan very dry, put it in a bowl, beat eggs
        > into it, until you think that it is right, take
        > afterwards a small iron spoon and with it put the
        > buns into the pan, let it fry slowly, then they are
        > ready. Lay the eggs in warm water.
        >
        > --------------------------------------------
        > Ruckenbrot - Rye Bread (Bauernbrot)
        > 1 1/2 ounces compressed fresh yeast, 1 qt warm
        > water, 2 T white sugar, 4 c all-purpose flour,
        > 8 c white rye flour, 4 c all-purpose flour, 2 T
        > salt, 1 tsp white sugar, 2 c warm water
        >
        > First, make the sourdough starter. Crumble the yeast
        > into a large bowl. Whisk in 1 quart of warm water
        > and 2 tablespoons of sugar until dissolved. The
        > water should be just slightly warmer than body
        > temperature. Gradually whisk in 4 cups of flour,
        > continuing to mix until all lumps are gone. Cover
        > with a dish towel, and let sit for 24 hours at room
        > temperature.
        > After 24 hours, stir well, cover, and let stand
        > another 24 hours. It will be a thin, light-colored
        > sourdough which is then ready to use.
        > In a large bowl, stir together the rye flour, 4 cups
        > of all-purpose flour, salt and sugar. Mix in the
        > sourdough starter using a wooden spoon, then stir in
        > 2 cups of warm water. I transfer the dough to a
        > heavy duty stand mixer to mix the first couple of
        > minutes, then it can't handle the heavy dough and I
        > start using my hands by turning the dough out onto a
        > floured surface. A clean countertop works best.
        > Knead the dough, adding a few tablespoons of water
        > at a time if it is too stiff. Fold the dough over,
        > pull it apart, whatever you can do to get it kneaded
        > up good. Total kneading time should be 15 to 20
        > minutes to get a smooth dough. Place the dough in a
        > large bowl, cover, and let rise until doubled, 1 to
        > 2 hours.
        > When the dough has risen, scrape it out of the bowl
        > and back onto a floured surface. Knead for about 5
        > minutes. This is important to activate the gluten.
        > Shape into 1 or 2 long loaves. Place on baking
        > sheets, and let rise for about 1 hour, or until your
        > finger leaves an impression when you poke the bread
        > gently.
        > Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F (190 degrees C).
        > Bake the bread for about 45 minutes for 2 loaves, 1
        > 1/2 hours if you made one big loaf. Don't worry if
        > the crust is dark. The bread will be delicious and
        > so will the crust. Cool completely before cutting.
        >




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      • ranvaig@columbus.rr.com
        ... I m not foolish enough to try to fry bread for 100 for a feast. I want to try them some other time though. ... I put the sugar in, but I ll try it without
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 25, 2007
          >Welcome to my Hell. :) Actual bread recipes are few
          >and far between. Having fried bread before one thing
          >I would recommend is that the buns be rather small or
          >you are going to over cook the outside before the
          >middle is cooked. Going much above a two inch ball
          >doesn't result in anything good. Either it's burned
          >or greasy (or both). Yech! :p

          I'm not foolish enough to try to fry bread for 100 for a feast. I want to try them some other time though.

          >
          >Personal preference: I'd leave out the sugar in the
          >sourdough starter. The yeast works on it too quickly
          >and can get spent before you need it. However, that
          >said, if you are in a cooler, drier climate, the sugar
          >can help compensate for that. But, that's the joy of
          >bread, it's part chemistry, and part art.

          I put the sugar in, but I'll try it without next time.
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