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Re: [contrarianlibrarian] Digest Number 486

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  • Terry Darr
    I agree-think testing skills is a good idea for new grads who desperately need to level the playing field when interviewing and competing against those with
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 1, 2007
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      I agree-think testing skills is a good idea for new
      grads who desperately need to level the "playing
      field" when interviewing and competing against those
      with more experience. I had to prepare and do a
      search for an academic reference job in front of a
      committee. (Didn't get the job but not because of my
      searching!)
      Terry
      --- contrarianlibrarian@yahoogroups.com wrote:


      ---------------------------------
      Contrarian Librarian Contrarian Librarian

      Messages In This Digest (7
      Messages)

      1.
      CNN Internship From: Wilson, Bruce

      2.
      Re: Where is everyone From: Wilson, Bruce


      3.
      two positions in Lake Charles, LA From:
      hastingsmerriman

      4a.
      Testing search skills of job applicants (was Re:
      Where is everyone ) From: Xavier Bullwinkle

      4b.
      Re: Testing search skills of job applicants (was
      Re: Where is everyo From: Xavier Bullwinkle

      5.
      Re: Testing search skills of job applicants
      From: Xavier Bullwinkle

      6.
      Posting Messages From: Xavier Bullwinkle

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      Messages
      1.
      CNN Internship
      Posted by: "Wilson, Bruce"
      brucewilson@...
      larryu81 Wed
      Jan 31, 2007 4:42 pm (PST)
      My name is Carrie Port and I am the internship
      coordinator for the library at CNN in Washington, DC.
      We are looking for an intern for Summer 2007. The
      description for this position is below. Please
      forward this posting onto any listserv or career
      center you might have. If you would like me to
      contact someone else at your school in the future,
      please let me know.

      Thank you,

      Carrie Port

      ----------------------------------------------------------

      Carrie Port

      News Librarian

      CNN America, Inc.

      202-898-7524

      carrie.port@...

      Summer 2007 Intern - Tape Library (DC)

      Turner Broadcasting/CNN News Library

      820 First Street, NE

      Washington, D.C. 20002

      Please Note: Internships are UNPAID and structured to
      last approximately 12 weeks. Resume and cover letter
      are required for application. Please include
      days/hours of availability in your cover letter and a
      college reference contact at the end of your resume.
      Students should have a strong academic record and good
      character. Students must have completed their
      sophomore year in college prior to the start of the
      internship. In addition, students may not have
      graduated college or graduate school prior to the
      start of the internship (i.e. students must still be
      enrolled in school during the time of the internship).
      Students must be receiving course credit for DC
      internships. Note to International Students: All
      international students will be required to provide
      documentation of proper visa paperwork prior to
      arrival if accepted to the program. Only student visas
      J1 or F1 visas will be accepted. Deadline to apply for
      summer internships is March 16, 2007.

      Internship Description: The CNN DC Bureau Library
      provides video and information in support of CNN's DC
      Bureau. It functions as both an archive and a research
      library. The library develops, manages and stores
      collections in an expanding variety of formats;
      provides access to information and knowledge held in
      those collections using appropriate storage, access
      and computer technologies; preserves the information
      for future use; and assists the bureau in the use of
      library resources. Additionally, the library provides
      research in support of the bureau's production needs,
      utilizing the most current technologies available -
      Lexis-Nexis; KR's Dialog, Factiva and the Internet.

      There are two CNN DC library internship opportunities
      available. Both internships will provide a great
      opportunity to learn various aspects of librarianship
      and television production in CNN's fast-paced library.
      One of the internships will be filled with a student
      pursuing a Master of Library Science (MLS) degree.
      Interns will assist the library staff in preparing for
      digital conversion by learning how to evaluate a
      section of the tape library and deciding which
      videotapes will be cataloged and saved as part of the
      permanent collection. This also includes learning to
      create library records for each saved tape and
      appropriately indexing those records for future
      retrieval. Interns will learn to use online resources
      to assist in evaluating video and in the creation of
      records. Interns will shadow the library staff as they
      complete requests for video and/or research to support
      the bureau's news coverage of DC political and federal
      events, programs such as The Situation Room, and other
      bureaus' needs of DC-centric information and video.

      The MLS intern will also learn to assist the
      librarians in various projects such as contributing
      ideas and compiling content for the DC Bureau's
      Library intranet site as well as helping to develop
      the intranet site; and library records/database
      maintenance. The MLS intern will have the opportunity
      to participate in the creation and development of
      instructional classes on various topics (e.g.,
      research techniques, print and internet resources).

      Qualifications: In order to facilitate the learning
      experience, the following qualifications are
      preferred. Candidates should have an interest in
      variety of areas including journalism and should be an
      organized self-starter. Interns should have the
      ability to make decisions, and accept others
      decisions, and be able to work well with a team of
      librarians and fellow interns.

      All interns should apply by emailing:

      Carrie Port

      CNN News Librarian

      820 First Street, NE

      Washington, D.C. 20002

      carrie.port@...

      AND

      Online at the Turner website at
      http://www.timewarner.com/corp/careers/jobtools_us/index.html
      listed under requisition #74311BR so that your
      application can be processed with Human Resources.

      Turner Broadcasting System, Inc. and its subsidiaries
      are Equal Opportunity Employers

      Bruce Alan Wilson, M.Ed., M.S.L.S.
      Reference Librarian, W.Va. Law Library
      304-558-2607 (Direct dial 304-340-3980)
      fax 304-558-3673


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      2.
      Re: Where is everyone
      Posted by: "Wilson, Bruce"
      brucewilson@...
      larryu81 Wed
      Jan 31, 2007 4:42 pm (PST)
      I'm sorry you're still unemployed. Have any of the
      openings I've posted been of any interest to you?

      Bruce Alan Wilson, M.Ed., M.S.L.S.
      Reference Librarian, W.Va. Law Library
      304-558-2607 (Direct dial 304-340-3980)
      fax 304-558-3673


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      (2)

      3.
      two positions in Lake Charles,
      LA Posted by: "hastingsmerriman"
      no_reply@yahoogroups.com
      hastingsmerriman
      Wed Jan 31, 2007 4:42 pm (PST)
      The Frazar Memorial Library at
      McNeese State University
      in Lake Charles, Louisiana
      has two openings...
      Reference Librarian &
      Head of Serials


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      (1)

      4a.
      Testing search skills of job
      applicants (was Re: Where is everyone )
      Posted by: "Xavier Bullwinkle"
      xward7@...
      xward7 Wed Jan 31, 2007
      4:48 pm (PST) "David
      Midyette" wrote:

      You know, it's funny. I've had several interviews of
      the past
      few years, but lately there has been somewhat of a
      change. Mind you
      I've been in the same area of librarianship
      (biomedical) for the
      past 6 years. I have always had good reviews, happy
      customers, and
      no company has tanked yet. Most folks I have
      discussed reference
      work with have agreed with my strategies, especially
      the folks at
      Dialog. I certainly know what I'm doing, and while
      I'm not the
      greatest reference librarian the ever lived I can
      certainly hold my
      own. Ok, so now to the point. I have been getting
      requests to
      perform test searches or show evidence of my work.
      Now, in my
      industry, pharmaceutics, it isn't exactly acceptable
      to share search
      strategies with folks outside of the company, and I
      wouldn't even
      consider it an option. My latest interview went very
      well. The
      prospective manager and I hit it off, and we had
      several hour long
      discussion about managing libraries, budgeting and
      finances,
      collection management, etc. We covered all of the
      basics, and I
      felt that I certainly proved myself to her. Of course
      she is not a
      librarian and fully admits that. What felt a bit odd
      was that two
      days after our interview, she called me and said she
      had some
      concerns about my research abilities. She asked me to
      perform a
      search just as I would at work. At first I was a bit
      put off, but
      agreed to the task. It was a fairly simple search,
      and I did
      exactly as she asked. I still haven't heard anything,
      and I have
      decided that I wouldn't take the job anyway. However,
      since when do
      you have to prove your abilities in that fashion. I
      have never been
      questioned on those abilities before, and definitely
      not in such a
      direct fashion. If she had questions about my
      abilities, shouldn't
      this have come up in the interview. I barely remember
      even
      discussing such things. As I said, I've been asked
      for this on only
      one other occasion, but that person turned out to be
      extremely
      bizarre, and several colleagues have made mention of
      this fact on
      more than one occasion. I sent her an example of a
      search I did on
      an evidenced-based medicine question. It was an older
      search, but I
      really didn't have anything else to send. When we met
      at a
      professional meeting a few months later, she greeted
      me and
      proceeced to say nothing. After that initial
      cordiality I suddenly
      faded into obscurity and she never said another word
      to me or even
      looked at me when we passed each other. Now I know
      librarians can
      be a bit strange, and I'm sure that I have my own
      peculiarities, but
      I am at least cordial and collegial to folks at a
      professional
      meeting. The whole dismissive, didn't really like
      your work thing
      is rather childish. I recognize that we all have our
      own styles of
      searching, and I have been confounded on more than one
      occasion that
      different librarians will arrive at different answers
      searching the
      same database. Let's face it, searching is an art
      form. Anyway,
      just a thought. I wonder if cataloging librarians are
      going to have
      to start submitting MARC records, and access service
      librarians will
      have to start submitting circulation stats. Where
      will it end???

      Pax,

      David


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      Messages in this topic
      (2)

      4b.
      Re: Testing search skills of
      job applicants (was Re: Where is everyo
      Posted by: "Xavier Bullwinkle"
      xward7@...
      xward7 Wed Jan 31, 2007
      5:27 pm (PST) Frankly, if
      testing search skills of job applicants is a trend,
      then
      I hope it continues. Or at least I'd like some
      indication that
      one's professional skills have some bearing on the
      hiring decision.

      My experience is in the public library realm, and I
      doubt this is a
      big problem in medical/special librarianship, but in
      public
      libraries I've found that reference/searching and
      other professional
      skills often don't seem to be a priority in hiring and
      promotion.
      Also, this type of testing might help level the
      playing field for
      new graduates who are good searchers, but lack job
      experience.

      XB

      --- In contrarianlibrarian@yahoogroups.com, "David
      Midyette" wrote:
      >
      >
      > You know, it's funny. I've had several
      interviews of the past
      > few years, but lately there has been somewhat of a
      change. Mind
      you
      > I've been in the same area of librarianship
      (biomedical) for the
      > past 6 years. I have always had good reviews, happy
      customers,
      and
      > no company has tanked yet. Most folks I have
      discussed reference
      > work with have agreed with my strategies, especially
      the folks at
      > Dialog. I certainly know what I'm doing, and while
      I'm not the
      > greatest reference librarian the ever lived I can
      certainly hold
      my
      > own. Ok, so now to the point. I have been getting
      requests to
      > perform test searches or show evidence of my work.
      Now, in my
      > industry, pharmaceutics, it isn't exactly acceptable
      to share
      search
      > strategies with folks outside of the company, and I
      wouldn't even
      > consider it an option. My latest interview went
      very well. The
      > prospective manager and I hit it off, and we had
      several hour long
      > discussion about managing libraries, budgeting and
      finances,
      > collection management, etc. We covered all of the
      basics, and I
      > felt that I certainly proved myself to her. Of
      course she is not
      a
      > librarian and fully admits that. What felt a bit
      odd was that two
      > days after our interview, she called me and said she
      had some
      > concerns about my research abilities. She asked me
      to perform a
      > search just as I would at work. At first I was a
      bit put off, but
      > agreed to the task. It was a fairly simple search,
      and I did
      > exactly as she asked. I still haven't heard
      anything, and I have
      > decided that I wouldn't take the job anyway.
      However, since when
      do
      > you have to prove your abilities in that fashion. I
      have never
      been
      > questioned on those abilities before, and definitely
      not in such a
      > direct fashion. If she had questions about my
      abilities,
      shouldn't
      > this have come up in the interview. I barely
      remember even
      > discussing such things. As I said, I've been asked
      for this on
      only
      > one other occasion, but that person turned out to be
      extremely
      > bizarre, and several colleagues have made mention of
      this fact on
      > more than one occasion. I sent her an example of a
      search I did
      on
      > an evidenced-based medicine question. It was an
      older search, but
      I
      > really didn't have anything else to send. When we
      met at a
      > professional meeting a few months later, she greeted
      me and
      > proceeced to say nothing. After that initial
      cordiality I
      suddenly
      > faded into obscurity and she never said another word
      to me or even
      > looked at me when we passed each other. Now I know
      librarians can
      > be a bit strange, and I'm sure that I have my own
      peculiarities,
      but
      > I am at least cordial and collegial to folks at a
      professional
      > meeting. The whole dismissive, didn't really like
      your work thing
      > is rather childish. I recognize that we all have
      our own styles
      of
      > searching, and I have been confounded on more than
      one occasion
      that
      > different librarians will arrive at different
      answers searching
      the
      > same database. Let's face it, searching is an art
      form. Anyway,
      > just a thought. I wonder if cataloging librarians
      are going to
      have
      > to start submitting MARC records, and access service
      librarians
      will
      > have to start submitting circulation stats. Where
      will it end???
      >
      > Pax,
      >
      > David
      >


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      Messages in this topic
      (2)

      5.
      Re: Testing search skills of
      job applicants Posted by: "Xavier
      Bullwinkle" xward7@...
      xward7
      Wed Jan 31, 2007 5:35 pm (PST)
      "Brian Gray" <mindspiral@...> wrote:

      Two or three years ago I interviewed for the
      research center of
      a financial organization. I was sent several typical
      questions and
      asked to bring with me to the interview the strategies
      I would use
      and/or the completed research. I believe their real
      goal was to
      evaluate if I could give short, precise summaries that
      people really
      wanted in the business world.

      Brian Gray
      mindspiral@...

      "David Midyette" wrote:

      You know, it's funny. I've had several interviews of
      the past
      few years, but lately there has been somewhat of a
      change. Mind you
      I've been in the same area of librarianship
      (biomedical) for the
      past 6 years. I have always had good reviews, happy
      customers, and
      no company has tanked yet. Most folks I have discussed
      reference
      work with have agreed with my strategies, especially
      the folks at
      Dialog. I certainly know what I'm doing, and while I'm
      not the
      greatest reference librarian the ever lived I can
      certainly hold my
      own. Ok, so now to the point. I have been getting
      requests to
      perform test searches or show evidence of my work.
      Now, in my
      industry, pharmaceutics, it isn't exactly acceptable
      to share search
      strategies with folks outside of the company, and I
      wouldn't even
      consider it an option. My latest interview went very
      well. The
      prospective manager and I hit it off, and we had
      several hour long
      discussion about managing libraries, budgeting and
      finances,
      collection management, etc. We covered all of the
      basics, and I
      felt that I certainly proved myself to her. Of course
      she is not a
      librarian and fully admits that. What felt a bit odd
      was that two
      days after our interview, she called me and said she
      had some
      concerns about my research abilities. She asked me to
      perform a
      search just as I would at work. At first I was a bit
      put off, but
      agreed to the task. It was a fairly simple search, and
      I did
      exactly as she asked. I still haven't heard anything,
      and I have
      decided that I wouldn't take the job anyway. However,
      since when do
      you have to prove your abilities in that fashion. I
      have never been
      questioned on those abilities before, and definitely
      not in such a
      direct fashion. If she had questions about my
      abilities, shouldn't
      this have come up in the interview. I barely remember
      even
      discussing such things. As I said, I've been asked for
      this on only
      one other occasion, but that person turned out to be
      extremely
      bizarre, and several colleagues have made mention of
      this fact on
      more than one occasion. I sent her an example of a
      search I did on
      an evidenced-based medicine question. It was an older
      search, but I
      really didn't have anything else to send. When we met
      at a
      professional meeting a few months later, she greeted
      me and
      proceeced to say nothing. After that initial
      cordiality I suddenly
      faded into obscurity and she never said another word
      to me or even
      looked at me when we passed each other. Now I know
      librarians can
      be a bit strange, and I'm sure that I have my own
      peculiarities, but
      I am at least cordial and collegial to folks at a
      professional
      meeting. The whole dismissive, didn't really like your
      work thing
      is rather childish. I recognize that we all have our
      own styles of
      searching, and I have been confounded on more than one
      occasion that
      different librarians will arrive at different answers
      searching the
      same database. Let's face it, searching is an art
      form. Anyway,
      just a thought. I wonder if cataloging librarians are
      going to have
      to start submitting MARC records, and access service
      librarians will
      have to start submitting circulation stats. Where will
      it end???

      Pax,
      David


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      Messages in this topic
      (1)

      6.
      Posting Messages
      Posted by: "Xavier Bullwinkle"
      xward7@...
      xward7 Wed Jan 31, 2007
      5:36 pm (PST) Since we
      haven't had much spam lately, I'm going to turn off
      the
      Moderation requirement temporarily to see if it's
      needed. I'm hoping
      this will speed up the delay between the time you post
      and the time
      your post appears in the group. If we start getting
      spammed, I'll
      turn it back on.


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      (1)


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      Theresa Kelly Darr
      410-377-8936
      darrtk@...
      http://darrtk.wordpress.com
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