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Re: NARAM 55

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  • kevinj73us
    The Harmon Flying Field launch site is located in Aurora, Portage County, Ohio, at 619 Bartlett Road, about one-third mile southeast of Page Road on the north
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 4, 2012
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      The Harmon Flying Field launch site is located in Aurora, Portage County, Ohio, at 619 Bartlett Road, about one-third mile southeast of Page Road on the north side of Bartlett Road (41°16'46.5"N, 81°19'7.5"W). The range will be set up to the northeast of the oil and gas well tanks near the center of this 140-acre field. Portions of that acreage are tree-covered, but there is a clear recovery area of about 2500' east-to-west by 1000' north-to-south. There are existing homes across Bartlett Road to the south.

      Use of this field will be shared with the Flying Aces of Aurora radio control aircraft club, but they will not be flying as a group on dates when we are launching.

      There is no high-power (Class 2 or higher) rocket waiver for this field. Rockets flown shall be limited to NFPA 1122 Model Rocket and FAA Class 1–Model Rocket.

      http://goo.gl/maps/buXWA

      --- In contestRoc@yahoogroups.com, "azsvs" <azsvs@...> wrote:
      >
      > Looks like a postage stamp sized field judging by the events. I'm happy to see a few lower power classes this time around. Much cheaper to practice and test with fractional A motors!
      >
      > Terrill
      >
    • Nerys
      So what does Class 1 mean? Will we be able to make low altitide 3.3 pound or less F/G engine flights? ie notification flights but no waiver ? Chris
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 7, 2012
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        So what does Class 1 mean?

        Will we be able to make low altitide 3.3 pound or less F/G engine flights? ie notification flights but no waiver ?

        Chris

        --- In contestRoc@yahoogroups.com, "kevinj73us" <kevinj73us@...> wrote:

        >
        > There is no high-power (Class 2 or higher) rocket waiver for this field. Rockets flown shall be limited to NFPA 1122 Model Rocket and FAA Class 1�Model Rocket.
        >
        > http://goo.gl/maps/buXWA
      • James Duffy
        ... http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&rgn=div5&view=text&node=14:2.0.1.3.15&idno=14#14:2.0.1.3.15.3.9.2 *or* http://tinyurl.com/y8ek6ab
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 7, 2012
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          On Aug 7, 2012, at 9:16 AM, Nerys wrote:

          > So what does Class 1 mean?

          http://ecfr.gpoaccess.gov/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=ecfr&rgn=div5&view=text&node=14:2.0.1.3.15&idno=14#14:2.0.1.3.15.3.9.2

          *or*

          http://tinyurl.com/y8ek6ab

          James

          _______________
          James Duffy
          jduffy@...
        • Bob Kaplow
          ... Class 1 is what FAA now calls model rocket up through the 125/1500g limits. No waiver required. ... Yes. Fly your G-force on G80s, or your big camera
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 7, 2012
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            --- On Tue, 8/7/12, Nerys <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
            |So what does Class 1 mean?

            Class 1 is what FAA now calls model rocket up through the 125/1500g limits. No waiver required.

            |Will we be able to make low altitide 3.3 pound or less F/G engine |flights? ie notification flights but no waiver ?

            Yes. Fly your G-force on G80s, or your big camera rockets all you want.

            Notification for "LMR" ended with the latest set of FAA rules changes. After over a decade of notification, they finally decided we were right and gave us what we asked for back in 1986 instead of the cumbersome 1994 rules. Bottom line was the new FAA didn't have the manpower to process all the notification requests. More often than not, they didn't understand what to do with them.

            While the field might be "legal" for a G motor flight an a smaller rocket, it looks like such a flight will have recovery problems. B SD might have recovery problems.

            And while some HPR can be flown without a waiver, the issue with this site is that the size and distance requirements do not comply with the HPR safety code. Who knows, the FAA might grant a waiver for this site. But since it doesn't comply with the HPR safety code, it's pointless.

            NARAM-53 was really close with this same problem. In order to fly HPR, they had to launch from a remote corner of the field, to be 1500' from occupied buildings. That made it a lousy HPR site, but it was legal for those that were willing to risk it. This site has no such hole where HPR can be legally flown.
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