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Berbice Dutch – Swedish

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  • Thomas Ruhm
    I made a teribly long Berbice Dutch û Swedish word list. It is almost done but I need the translation for eight words. All words in the list are attested, but
    Message 1 of 14 , Aug 22, 2014
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      I made a teribly long Berbice Dutch – Swedish word list. It is almost done but I need the translation for eight words. All words in the list are attested, but I also have a list only for German, with explanations why I chose them and what changes I made compared to their source.

      For the following I would like to have Swedish translations:

      - On land, as opposed to on water
      - Is it? or Isn't it?
      - Salted fish, probalby cod
      - At day time
      - The inner part of a bend in a river
      - The outer part of a bend in a river
      - A slap in the face
      - Fits, probaby like when you have epilepsia or something similar

      There is also a word called krampu, and that is, I think rather harmless, like a cramp in the calf.

      I will post the complete word list soon.
    • Thomas Ruhm
      Nobody speak Swedish? Maybe I better should have made a Norwegian translation. I made some mistakes in the other versions and will fix that later.
      Message 2 of 14 , Aug 22, 2014
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        Nobody speak Swedish? Maybe I better should have made a Norwegian translation. I made some mistakes in the other versions and will fix that later.
      • Baptiste PARIS
        Hej, I learnt swedish at school a while ago and here is how I d say these words: - On land, as opposed to on water på landet - Is it? or Isn t it? eller hur ?
        Message 3 of 14 , Aug 22, 2014
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          Hej, I learnt swedish at school a while ago and here is how I'd say these
          words:

          - On land, as opposed to on water
          på landet

          - Is it? or Isn't it?
          eller hur ? (="or how?" at the end of a question, works for both)

          - Salted fish, probalby cod
          en torsk (=cod)

          - At day time
          på dagtid / på dag ("dag" is the time from sunrise to sunset and "dygn"
          means a 24-hour period)

          - The inner part of a bend in a river
          - The outer part of a bend in a river
          I have no idea

          - A slap in the face
          en örfil (see http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%C3%B6rfil)

          - Fits, probaby like when you have epilepsia or something similar
          (epileptiska) anfall

          I hope I helped you
        • Thomas Ruhm
          Yes, that helped. I am not sure if I should translate bakliau as cod or as salted cod. Do you speak Swedish well? I would like to learn more Swedish and I am
          Message 4 of 14 , Aug 22, 2014
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            Yes, that helped. I am not sure if I should translate bakliau as cod or as salted cod. Do you speak Swedish well? I would like to learn more Swedish and I am trying to read a novel in it. It is a fantasy novel.
          • Baptiste PARIS
            Well, my Swedish is a bit rusty since I haven t had a chance to speak with a swede since school / for more than 4 years. I would also like to learn more of
            Message 5 of 14 , Aug 22, 2014
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              Well, my Swedish is a bit rusty since I haven't had a chance to speak with
              a swede since school / for more than 4 years. I would also like to learn
              more of this beautiful language.


              2014-08-23 0:49 GMT+02:00 Thomas Ruhm <thomas@...>:

              > Yes, that helped. I am not sure if I should translate bakliau as cod or as
              > salted cod. Do you speak Swedish well? I would like to learn more Swedish
              > and I am trying to read a novel in it. It is a fantasy novel.




              --
              wlib <http://www.whylinuxisbetter.net/index_fr.php?lang=fr>
            • Thomas Ruhm
              Meanwhile I published my word list. For me it is also some years since I had been studding Swedish more, but I was never very good at it. You find it easily,
              Message 6 of 14 , Aug 22, 2014
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                Meanwhile I published my word list. For me it is also some years since I had been studding Swedish more, but I was never very good at it. You find it easily, but I don't want to post my blog's address so often. Use a search engine, if you like.
              • W Biggs
                According to a grammar of Berbice-Dutch I found on google books, bakliau s English translation is saltfish . Another book, this one in German, translates it
                Message 7 of 14 , Aug 22, 2014
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                  According to a grammar of Berbice-Dutch I found on google books, bakliau's English translation is "saltfish". Another book, this one in German, translates it as "salzfisch" which means "saltfish" in English.

                  http://goo.gl/zBp3W0
                  http://goo.gl/zt9sRY

                  ~WB

                  > On Aug 22, 2014, at 6:49 PM, Thomas Ruhm <thomas@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Yes, that helped. I am not sure if I should translate bakliau as cod or as salted cod. Do you speak Swedish well? I would like to learn more Swedish and I am trying to read a novel in it. It is a fantasy novel.
                • Thomas Ruhm
                  Here it says that bakeljauw means dried cod and that in Sranan Tongo one says batyaw. Bakliau is translated as dried cod or salted fish.
                  Message 8 of 14 , Aug 22, 2014
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                    Here it says that 'bakeljauw' means dried cod and that in Sranan Tongo one says batyaw. Bakliau is translated as dried cod or salted fish.

                    http://depot.knaw.nl/10253/1/Nww_compleet_archief.pdf

                    > According to a grammar of Berbice-Dutch I found on google books, bakliau's English translation is "saltfish". Another book, this one in German, translates it as "salzfisch" which means "saltfish" in English.
                    >
                    > http://goo.gl/zBp3W0
                    > http://goo.gl/zt9sRY
                    >
                    > ~WB
                  • Julanga
                    I am a native speaker of Swedish. Here are my additions: ... on land = på land på landet means something else that I guess is in the countryside in
                    Message 9 of 14 , Aug 24, 2014
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                      I am a native speaker of Swedish. Here are my additions:

                      2014-08-23 0:35 GMT+02:00 Baptiste PARIS <baptiste.paris.v@...>:

                      > Hej, I learnt swedish at school a while ago and here is how I'd say these
                      > words:
                      >
                      > - On land, as opposed to on water
                      > på landet


                      on land = på land

                      "på landet" means something else that I guess is "in the countryside" in
                      English.


                      - Is it? or Isn't it?
                      > eller hur ? (="or how?" at the end of a question, works for both)
                      >
                      > - Salted fish, probalby cod
                      > en torsk (=cod)
                      >
                      > - At day time
                      > på dagtid / på dag ("dag" is the time from sunrise to sunset and "dygn"
                      > means a 24-hour period)
                      >

                      "dagtid" or "på dagen" ("på dagtid" might work too, but I am not confident
                      without context)


                      - The inner part of a bend in a river
                      > - The outer part of a bend in a river
                      > I have no idea
                      >
                      > - A slap in the face
                      > en örfil (see http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%C3%B6rfil)
                      >

                      Perhaps "a slap in the face" is meant as an idiom. For this I don't think
                      "en örfil" is valid. English Wiktionary lists "an insult, a humiliation" as
                      a second meaning, but I have never encountered it, and Swedish Wiktionary
                      doesn't mention it.

                      An "örfil" is an open-handed slap to the face, a bitch slap.

                      For the idiomatic sense, I would probably use "ett slag i ansiktet", which
                      is close to a literal translation as well.


                      - Fits, probaby like when you have epilepsia or something similar
                      > (epileptiska) anfall
                      >

                      Yes. "anfall" could also be translated into English as "attack(s)".


                      -- Julanga
                    • R A Brown
                      ... [snip] ... Oh yes, it is not an uncommon expression with that meaning. We might say of some humiliating situation or perhaps cutting remark That was a
                      Message 10 of 14 , Aug 24, 2014
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                        On 24/08/2014 16:25, Julanga wrote:
                        > I am a native speaker of Swedish. Here are my additions:
                        >
                        > 2014-08-23 0:35 GMT+02:00 Baptiste PARIS
                        [snip]
                        >> - A slap in the face en örfil (see
                        >> http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%C3%B6rfil)
                        >>
                        >
                        > Perhaps "a slap in the face" is meant as an idiom. For
                        > this I don't think "en örfil" is valid. English
                        > Wiktionary lists "an insult, a humiliation" as a second
                        > meaning, but I have never encountered it,

                        Oh yes, it is not an uncommon expression with that meaning.
                        We might say of some humiliating situation or perhaps
                        cutting remark "That was a right slap in the face for him/her."

                        > and Swedish Wiktionary doesn't mention it.
                        >
                        > An "örfil" is an open-handed slap to the face, a bitch
                        > slap.

                        ... which restricts the English meaning and may not be what
                        was intended.

                        > For the idiomatic sense, I would probably use "ett slag
                        > i ansiktet", which is close to a literal translation as
                        > well.

                        Yep.

                        --
                        Ray
                        ==================================
                        http://www.carolandray.plus.com
                        ==================================
                        "Ein Kopf, der auf seine eigene Kosten denkt,
                        wird immer Eingriffe in die Sprache thun."
                        [J.G. Hamann, 1760]
                        "A mind that thinks at its own expense
                        will always interfere with language".
                      • Julanga
                        ... I meant that I have never encountered en örfil in Swedish with this meaning. I know the English idiom, but think that en örfil isn t a valid
                        Message 11 of 14 , Aug 24, 2014
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                          2014-08-24 18:17 GMT+02:00 R A Brown <ray@...>:

                          > Perhaps "a slap in the face" is meant as an idiom. For
                          >> this I don't think "en örfil" is valid. English
                          >> Wiktionary lists "an insult, a humiliation" as a second
                          >> meaning, but I have never encountered it,
                          >>
                          >
                          > Oh yes, it is not an uncommon expression with that meaning.
                          > We might say of some humiliating situation or perhaps
                          > cutting remark "That was a right slap in the face for him/her."


                          I meant that I have never encountered "en örfil" in Swedish with this
                          meaning. I know the English idiom, but think that "en örfil" isn't a valid
                          translation for this idiom.

                          Or are you saying that "en örfil" is common in Swedish with this meaning?


                          -- Julanga
                        • Thomas Ruhm
                          Alandi means land, as oposed to water, on land and on try ground. Bidaka can mean daylight, by day light or get light or dawn. That how it translates in the
                          Message 12 of 14 , Aug 24, 2014
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                            Alandi means land, as oposed to water, on land and on try ground.

                            Bidaka can mean daylight, by day light or get light or dawn. That how it translates in the grammar. The slap it the face is really a slap not a metaphor.

                            How do I say "outer part of a river bend" and "inner part of a river band"? It is alright if is as long as the English description.

                            Thanks to Ray and Julanga and to Baptiste and W, who answered yesterday

                            Stoipi, which is translated as fits doesn't have an example sentence. Yay! I just found it exists in Sranantongo. The translation is 'convulsie, epilepsie'.

                            Here is the list. Because I can't write Swedish sentences and because the list is so long, it doesn't have explanations. I do have another list with home made words, but only in German and with German explanations. It is where it says "Neue Wörter für Berbice-Niederländisch".

                            http://warjapu.wordpress.com/berbice-nederlandsk-svensk/
                          • Julanga
                            ... på land = on land land = land (as opposed to water, dry ground; it has other translations as well: country , nation , but it is valid for what
                            Message 13 of 14 , Aug 24, 2014
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                              2014-08-24 19:33 GMT+02:00 Thomas Ruhm <thomas@...>:

                              > Alandi means land, as oposed to water, on land and on try ground.
                              >

                              "på land" = "on land"
                              "land" = "land" (as opposed to water, dry ground; it has other translations
                              as well: "country", "nation", but it is valid for what you are looking for)
                              "på landet" = "in the countryside"
                              "torr mark" = "dry ground"
                              "på torr mark" = "on dry ground"


                              Bidaka can mean daylight, by day light or get light or dawn. That how it
                              > translates in the grammar. The slap it the face is really a slap not a
                              > metaphor.
                              >

                              "dagsljus" = "daylight"
                              "gryning" = "dawn"
                              "få ljus" = "get light"
                              "bli ljust" = "get bright"
                              "dag" = "daytime" / "day"


                              How do I say "outer part of a river bend" and "inner part of a river band"?
                              > It is alright if is as long as the English description.
                              >

                              "yttre del av en älvs krökning" = "outer part of a river bend"
                              "inre del av en älvs krökning" = "inner part of a river bend"


                              -- Julanga
                            • R A Brown
                              ... Ah! ... No, sorry - misunderstood you :( -- Ray ================================== http://www.carolandray.plus.com ==================================
                              Message 14 of 14 , Aug 24, 2014
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                                On 24/08/2014 17:31, Julanga wrote:
                                > 2014-08-24 18:17 GMT+02:00 R A Brown
                                > <ray@...>:
                                >
                                >> Perhaps "a slap in the face" is meant as an idiom. For
                                >>> this I don't think "en örfil" is valid. English
                                >>> Wiktionary lists "an insult, a humiliation" as a
                                >>> second meaning, but I have never encountered it,
                                >>>
                                >>
                                >> Oh yes, it is not an uncommon expression with that
                                >> meaning. We might say of some humiliating situation or
                                >> perhaps cutting remark "That was a right slap in the
                                >> face for him/her."
                                >
                                >
                                > I meant that I have never encountered "en örfil" in
                                > Swedish with this meaning. I know the English idiom, but
                                > think that "en örfil" isn't a valid translation for this
                                > idiom.

                                Ah!

                                > Or are you saying that "en örfil" is common in Swedish
                                > with this meaning?

                                No, sorry - misunderstood you :(

                                --
                                Ray
                                ==================================
                                http://www.carolandray.plus.com
                                ==================================
                                "Ein Kopf, der auf seine eigene Kosten denkt,
                                wird immer Eingriffe in die Sprache thun."
                                [J.G. Hamann, 1760]
                                "A mind that thinks at its own expense
                                will always interfere with language".
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