Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Music in conlangs and conworlds

Expand Messages
  • Roger Mills
    Charlie wrote: I don’t know yet [re organum].  Not being able as yet to hear the music I can’t decide.  I’m thinking (using C, D, E, F♯, G♯, A♯)
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 6, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Charlie wrote:

      I don’t know yet [re organum].  Not being able as yet to hear the music I can’t
      decide.  I’m thinking (using C, D, E, F♯, G♯, A♯) of something like C,
      E, G♯.  I don’t know how this would sound although, even if strange to
      Western ears,

      RM which it is, kind of-- it's the "augmented fifth", as are the other combinations of 3 successive notes in that scale; they're used, but sparingly. However-- C-E, C-F#, E-G# etc. are thirds, considered harmonious in Western music, though they were a no-no in early music....And the inverse of those (E-upper C, F#-upper D etc.) are sixths, also now considered harmonious (but  no-nos in early music IIRC).


      it might not be strange to other cultures.
      RM true dat....They may well have different ideas as to what is harmonious.

      The
      opening phrase of the song is sung by one of the voices, then the other
      two join at their respective intervals.  Of course it is not necessary
      that at least three of the Peoples be present to sing.  If it’s in a
      local community, then the three parts can be sung by any members of the
      community.  But the timbre of the different Peoples' voices make for a
      splendid sound.

      Thank you, Andrew, for the suggestion.  I will see what I can do with it.

      RM YES, I took a look at it, and it looks possibly a little more user-friendly than Noteworthy Composer (free), which I do have and have been trying to puzzle out....I may give it a try.....But composing programs are fun to play with!!
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.