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Re: Onomatopoeia - do you make use of it?

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  • Roger Mills
    ... ============================================= Lots of it in Kash. Just to start-- teka refers to clicking sounds; andeka is a (typewriter/computer)
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 20, 2013
      > Am 20.09.2013 um 18:56 schrieb Matthew George <matt.msg@...>:

      >
      >>  Do you make an effort to include onomatopoeia in your conlangs?  If  it's a  language for
      >> an alien species with different perceptions, do you try to  create accordingly?
      >
      > Yeah, Rejistanian uses a lot onomatopoeia, like 'ukuku for "to

      > type" (on a typewriter or keyboard), or 'sxa for "to whisper"
      =============================================

      Lots of it in Kash. Just to start-- teka refers to clicking sounds; andeka is a (typewriter/computer) keyboard; teka can also be used for '... o'clock'

      Others--
      hiri (~ redup.) whirring noise (high pitch); huru (~ redup) id. lower pitch
      kirik creaky noises
      krak sound of s.t. breaking
      kratup to fall on one's back (prob. < tup bounce. NB tupatúp slang/humorous for sexual intercourse))
      krek crackly things; kreki a cookie/cracker
      krici squeaking sounds
      krongo grunt
      kruñ growl
      çeñ sound of cymbals  (ç = [S])
      çusu rustling sounds (some fabrics, dry leaves)
      cak, cik, cek, cuk, cok imit. of the sounds made by the various saurians; cak is generik, cik, cek are high         pitched/smaller species, cuk cok are lower pitch, larger species (The saurians of Cindu range in size from     little household geckos to (avg.) Komodo dragon, (rarer), size of a big horse
      coco sound of sucking at the breast
      ñuñuñ to mutter, grumble
      sit scratching;  asit a line
      tam drum, drumming; tum, tom lower pitch or louder
      fup fart
      prup ~purúp sound of bubbling, pouring liquid out of a container.   
          pruprup sound of stomach gas
      eñe ~eñeñ the bleating sound made by lopas (sheep/goat analogue); as vb, yeñe to bleat, also, to wheedle     insistently, like child who wants something badly.

      Also some near-onomat. forms e.g.
      yamen to call out, to summon > yambren to shout, yayambren ~yayap to scream
      and others....
    • Matthew George
      Thank you for those colorful examples - I can really perceive how they convey the nature of their referents, assuming I m interpreting the phonology correctly.
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 21, 2013
        Thank you for those colorful examples - I can really perceive how they
        convey the nature of their referents, assuming I'm interpreting the
        phonology correctly. Syllable-ending ñ is a bit of a challenge for me.

        Do you have any analysis of how and why a sequence of phones evokes sounds
        or actions? 'krak' seems like a good example of cracking or breaking, but
        if you voice the last consonant the association vanishes. Turning p to b
        doesn't disrupt 'pruprup' to my ear, but changing 'pop' to 'bob' (forex)
        does. I have no systematic way to understand my reactions, and am curious
        as to others' degree of rational insight.

        Matt G.
      • Alex Fink
        ... Well, you re in luck: Kash has an allophonic rule that final -ñ is [N]. ... This isn t general enough to deserve the title of system either, but
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 21, 2013
          On Sat, 21 Sep 2013 15:56:05 -0400, Matthew George <matt.msg@...> wrote:

          >Thank you for those colorful examples - I can really perceive how they
          >convey the nature of their referents, assuming I'm interpreting the
          >phonology correctly. Syllable-ending ñ is a bit of a challenge for me.

          Well, you're in luck: Kash has an allophonic rule that final -ñ is [N].

          >Do you have any analysis of how and why a sequence of phones evokes sounds
          >or actions? 'krak' seems like a good example of cracking or breaking, but
          >if you voice the last consonant the association vanishes. Turning p to b
          >doesn't disrupt 'pruprup' to my ear, but changing 'pop' to 'bob' (forex)
          >does. I have no systematic way to understand my reactions, and am curious
          >as to others' degree of rational insight.

          This isn't general enough to deserve the title of "system" either, but something comes to mind for these cases you bring up. In English, at least, final voiceless stops are articulated with glottalisation and with (etically) shorter vowels, both of which increase the abruptness of the cessation of sonority, whereas final voiceless stops are unglotallised and have (etically) longer vowels. Cacking and popping are both abrupt, punctual events, so their representations [krak] and [pop] benefit from this voiceless-stop abruptness. By contrast, stomach gas is an iterative series of burblings, certainly not abrupt as a whole (nor even as abrupt in its parts), so its representation [pruprup]~[brubrub] doesn't lose meetness without this effect.

          Alex
        • C. Brickner
          I didn’t realize that Senjecas had so many until the question was asked. báába: bleat bálba: babble báɱa: bay ( = /m_0/) booúla: bubble búþa:
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 22, 2013
            I didn’t realize that Senjecas had so many until the question was asked.

            báába: bleat
            bálba: babble
            báɱa: bay (<ɱ> = /m_0/)
            booúla: bubble
            búþa: throb, beat
            ðérɱa: rumble, roar
            fííɱa: spit
            gála: yell
            gáɱa: squawk, caw
            gúra: grunt
            ĸááĸa: choke
            ĸáĸa: cackle, cluck
            ĸeĸaĸú: cock-a-doodle-doo
            ĸʷása: cough
            ĸʷáĸa: quack
            ĸúĸa: cuckoo
            lááa: barĸ
            múúga: low, moo
            múra: murmur
            núra: growl
            pálba: chatter, jabber
            píípa: chirp, peep
            qrúsa: gnash (<q> = /j\/)
            qúma: howl
            rééĸa: neigh, chortle
            rééta: roar
            síma: whisper
            súsa: bluster, sough
            sʷéra: buzz, hum
            sʲúna: whine
            télĸa: rap, toll
            tómpa: boom
            túta: coo
            úla: hoot
            vrésa: crackle, rustle
            xáta: pop, puff (<x> = /C/)
            xúra: snore
            zíga: sigh
            zúba: grit the teeth

            Charlie

            ----- Original Message -----
            It was a little surprising to me to realize how common onomatopoeia is in
            English, and it seems in many other natural languages, although the
            relationship between word and sound isn't always obvious to non-native
            speakers. (I found a list of representations of animal sounds in various
            languages to be quite bemusing.)

            Do you make an effort to include onomatopoeia in your conlangs? If it's a
            language for an alien species with different perceptions, do you try to
            create accordingly?

            Matt G.
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