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Re: Time for Another Party! Oskana|not Tedve|l Dabolnea!

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  • C. Brickner
    ... Hi everyone! Now, what is this 500th entry in the dictionary? It s the stem _ugejuge_, used in the intranitive verb _jugejugej_: to step, to walk , but
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 17, 2013
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      ----- Original Message -----
      Hi everyone!

      Now, what is this 500th entry in the dictionary? It's the stem _ugejuge_,
      used in the intranitive verb _jugejugej_: "to step, to walk", but also as a
      noun _ugejuge_: "walk, stroll, hike". Once again, it's a very good example
      of how much care I put in creating vocabulary in Moten:
      _______________________________________

      The Senjecan word that I had for ‘stroll’‘ was a compound of two verbs which I found very cumbersome. So, being inspired by Christophe’s message, I decided to form it in another way. Senjecas has two prefixes for diminutives, “-k-“ and “-l-“. All Senjecan verb roots are monosyllabic, of the form (C)(V)VC-. If I add a diminutive suffix to the verb root, I can convey the idea of gently, easily, leisurely, partially, etc. Thus, “néða”, walk, can be changed to “néðla”, stroll. The speakers of Senjecas prefer “-l-“ to “-k-“, but “-k-“ would be used to avoid a geminate consonant: “dila”, disclose, reveal, manifest > “dilka”, hint, imply, insinuate. Lenition may be necessary: “tééda”, burn [of the sun] > “tééðla”, tan.
      BTW, “hike” is translated by a compound verb that I don’t find so cumbersome: “ȝúta”, wander, and néða”, walk, > ȝuþnéða”.
      Charlie
    • Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
      ... Thanks! I didn t think I d get there so quickly! ... Read this: http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.nl/2013/01/lexember-month-of-moten-words.htmland this:
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 18, 2013
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        On 17 September 2013 18:07, Padraic Brown <elemtilas@...> wrote:

        > Chapeau! Congratulations on reaching the big 5-0-0!
        >
        >
        Thanks! I didn't think I'd get there so quickly!


        > But, what is this Lexember you mention?
        >
        >
        Read this:
        http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.nl/2013/01/lexember-month-of-moten-words.htmland
        this:
        http://fantasticaldevices.blogspot.nl/2012/11/lexember.html for more
        information. Basically it was an idea of Mia Soderquist and Pete Bleackley:
        for a month, create one word per day for your conlang(s), and post it on
        Twitter with the hashtag #Lexember, and on Google+ (and maybe on Facebook,
        but as I'm not there I can't tell if there's also a #Lexember thread
        there). The first Lexember event was last year in December, and since the
        1st of September we've been running the second Lexember month :). It's a
        fun and playful way to increase one's conlang's vocabulary and close
        semantic gaps. As everyone post their words as they create them, we can
        inspire each other with new words we wouldn't have thought about otherwise
        :).


        > Funny: " basically all the senses of English "step",
        > except that _uge_ cannot refer to the steps of a ladder "
        > because, at least in my English, ladders don't have steps
        > at all. They have rungs.


        Funny, Wiktionary gives as first definition for "rung": "A crosspiece
        forming a _step of a ladder_; a round" (emphasis mine). So at least some
        people have ladders with steps :). I know that's the word I learned (I
        don't think I've ever heard the word "rung" before, at least not in this
        context). Maybe a British vs. American English thing, or something more
        complicated again...

        Then again, things tend to get complicated with those things. I mean,
        "stair" seems to be able to mean either a single step in a staircase or an
        entire staircase depending on the speaker!


        > Stepladders do have steps, though,
        > but only three or four. Much more than that and the thing
        > morphs into a propper ladder with rungs. :))
        >
        >
        Well, some people like their ladders simple and just populate them with
        steps :P. I'll try to remember the word "rung". Since in Moten _uge_
        doesn't refer to the steps of a ladder (or a stepladder), once I've defined
        the word for that in Moten, I'll have to remember to gloss it as "rung" as
        well ;).


        > " "walk" is a complete collection of "steps" " That I like.
        >
        >
        It does kinda make sense, doesn't it? :P
        --
        Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

        http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
        http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
      • C. Brickner
        When I use stair to mean the staircase or the flight of stairs, I use it in the plural, as in upstairs, downstairs. He climbed the stairs to his bedroom.
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 18, 2013
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          When I use "stair" to mean the staircase or the flight of stairs, I use it in the plural, as in upstairs, downstairs. He climbed the stairs to his bedroom.
          Charlie

          ----- Original Message -----
          On 17 September 2013 18:07, Padraic Brown <elemtilas@...> wrote:

          > Chapeau! Congratulations on reaching the big 5-0-0!
          >
          >
          Thanks! I didn't think I'd get there so quickly!


          > But, what is this Lexember you mention?
          >
          >
          Read this:
          http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.nl/2013/01/lexember-month-of-moten-words.htmland
          this:
          http://fantasticaldevices.blogspot.nl/2012/11/lexember.html for more
          information. Basically it was an idea of Mia Soderquist and Pete Bleackley:
          for a month, create one word per day for your conlang(s), and post it on
          Twitter with the hashtag #Lexember, and on Google+ (and maybe on Facebook,
          but as I'm not there I can't tell if there's also a #Lexember thread
          there). The first Lexember event was last year in December, and since the
          1st of September we've been running the second Lexember month :). It's a
          fun and playful way to increase one's conlang's vocabulary and close
          semantic gaps. As everyone post their words as they create them, we can
          inspire each other with new words we wouldn't have thought about otherwise
          :).


          > Funny: " basically all the senses of English "step",
          > except that _uge_ cannot refer to the steps of a ladder "
          > because, at least in my English, ladders don't have steps
          > at all. They have rungs.


          Funny, Wiktionary gives as first definition for "rung": "A crosspiece
          forming a _step of a ladder_; a round" (emphasis mine). So at least some
          people have ladders with steps :). I know that's the word I learned (I
          don't think I've ever heard the word "rung" before, at least not in this
          context). Maybe a British vs. American English thing, or something more
          complicated again...

          Then again, things tend to get complicated with those things. I mean,
          "stair" seems to be able to mean either a single step in a staircase or an
          entire staircase depending on the speaker!


          > Stepladders do have steps, though,
          > but only three or four. Much more than that and the thing
          > morphs into a propper ladder with rungs. :))
          >
          >
          Well, some people like their ladders simple and just populate them with
          steps :P. I'll try to remember the word "rung". Since in Moten _uge_
          doesn't refer to the steps of a ladder (or a stepladder), once I've defined
          the word for that in Moten, I'll have to remember to gloss it as "rung" as
          well ;).


          > " "walk" is a complete collection of "steps" " That I like.
          >
          >
          It does kinda make sense, doesn't it? :P
          --
          Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

          http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
          http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
        • Padraic Brown
          ... I have certainly done that. Although the singular stair can also apply to the whole staircase. Go up the stairs and turn right kind of thing. ... Now
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 18, 2013
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            > From: C. Brickner <tepeyachill@...>

            >
            > When I use "stair" to mean the staircase or the flight of stairs, I use it in the plural,

            I have certainly done that. Although the singular "stair" can also apply to the whole staircase.
            "Go up the stairs and turn right" kind of thing.

            > as in upstairs, downstairs.

            Now here, these I take as adverbs (the old adverbial genitive), indicative of motion
            along (i.e. moving along the stair in an upward direction) or else place at which (i.e.
            being in an upper level of the building). Which depends on the verb used.

            > He climbed the stairs to his bedroom.

            Yes.

            Sorry Christophe! Didn't realise stairs and ladders would be so complicated an issue!

            Padraic

            > Charlie
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > On 17 September 2013 18:07, Padraic Brown <elemtilas@...> wrote:
            >
            >> Chapeau! Congratulations on reaching the big 5-0-0!
            >>
            >>
            > Thanks! I didn't think I'd get there so quickly!
            >
            >
            >> But, what is this Lexember you mention?
            >>
            >>
            > Read this:
            > http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.nl/2013/01/lexember-month-of-moten-words.htmland
            > this:
            > http://fantasticaldevices.blogspot.nl/2012/11/lexember.html for more
            > information. Basically it was an idea of Mia Soderquist and Pete Bleackley:
            > for a month, create one word per day for your conlang(s), and post it on
            > Twitter with the hashtag #Lexember, and on Google+ (and maybe on Facebook,
            > but as I'm not there I can't tell if there's also a #Lexember thread
            > there). The first Lexember event was last year in December, and since the
            > 1st of September we've been running the second Lexember month :). It's a
            > fun and playful way to increase one's conlang's vocabulary and close
            > semantic gaps. As everyone post their words as they create them, we can
            > inspire each other with new words we wouldn't have thought about otherwise
            > :).
            >
            >
            >> Funny: " basically all the senses of English "step",
            >> except that _uge_ cannot refer to the steps of a ladder "
            >> because, at least in my English, ladders don't have steps
            >> at all. They have rungs.
            >
            >
            > Funny, Wiktionary gives as first definition for "rung": "A
            > crosspiece
            > forming a _step of a ladder_; a round" (emphasis mine). So at least some
            > people have ladders with steps :). I know that's the word I learned (I
            > don't think I've ever heard the word "rung" before, at least
            > not in this
            > context). Maybe a British vs. American English thing, or something more
            > complicated again...
            >
            > Then again, things tend to get complicated with those things. I mean,
            > "stair" seems to be able to mean either a single step in a staircase
            > or an
            > entire staircase depending on the speaker!
            >
            >
            >> Stepladders do have steps, though,
            >> but only three or four. Much more than that and the thing
            >> morphs into a propper ladder with rungs. :))
            >>
            >>
            > Well, some people like their ladders simple and just populate them with
            > steps :P. I'll try to remember the word "rung". Since in Moten
            > _uge_
            > doesn't refer to the steps of a ladder (or a stepladder), once I've
            > defined
            > the word for that in Moten, I'll have to remember to gloss it as
            > "rung" as
            > well ;).
            >
            >
            >> " "walk" is a complete collection of "steps"
            > " That I like.
            >>
            >>
            > It does kinda make sense, doesn't it? :P
            > --
            > Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.
            >
            > http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
            > http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
            >
          • Padraic Brown
            ... Ah, thank you for the explanation! ... Huh. Sòme people will say any old thing! ;) Seriously, I d understand what they mean, but it sounds funny all the
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 18, 2013
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              >> But, what is this Lexember you mention?

              >
              > Basically it was an idea of Mia Soderquist and Pete Bleackley:
              > for a month, create one word per day for your conlang(s), and post it on
              > Twitter with the hashtag #Lexember, and on Google+ (and maybe on Facebook,
              > but as I'm not there I can't tell if there's also a #Lexember thread
              > there).

              Ah, thank you for the explanation!

              >> Funny: " basically all the senses of English "step",
              >> except that _uge_ cannot refer to the steps of a ladder "
              >> because, at least in my English, ladders don't have steps
              >> at all. They have rungs.
              >
              >
              > Funny, Wiktionary gives as first definition for "rung": "A
              > crosspiece
              > forming a _step of a ladder_; a round" (emphasis mine). So at least some
              > people have ladders with steps :).

              Huh. Sòme people will say any old thing! ;) Seriously, I'd understand what they mean,
              but it sounds funny all the same.

              > I know that's the word I learned (I
              > don't think I've ever heard the word "rung" before, at least
              > not in this
              > context). Maybe a British vs. American English thing, or something more
              > complicated again...
              >
              > Then again, things tend to get complicated with those things. I mean,
              > "stair" seems to be able to mean either a single step in a staircase
              > or an entire staircase depending on the speaker!

              Indeed! Then again, not all things with steps are stairs or staircases as such. We've
              also got stoops, stepstones, doorsteps, back steps (and front steps), all of which may
              have an indeterminate number of steps (perhaps one to four or five). I wouldn't call
              any of those things "stairs". But any more than that and I'd say they become stairs proper.

              >> " "walk" is a complete collection of "steps"
              > " That I like.
              >
              > It does kinda make sense, doesn't it? :P

              Indeed! After all, a "walk" is the entire set or collection of individual steps taken during the
              official duration of the walk, as opposed to all the steps (and missteps) one may take in a
              day and perhaps also excluding any steps one may take on a side adventure into for example
              a book shop or diner that are not, strictly speaking, part of the "walk" itself!

              Padraic

              > Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.
            • Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
              ... Actually, I like this idea a lot, especially since, like Senjecas, Moten allows diminutive suffixes on verbs too (the diminutive suffix _-sin_ can be used
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 18, 2013
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                On 17 September 2013 21:05, C. Brickner <tepeyachill@...> wrote:

                >
                > The Senjecan word that I had for ‘stroll’‘ was a compound of two verbs
                > which I found very cumbersome. So, being inspired by Christophe’s message,
                > I decided to form it in another way. Senjecas has two prefixes for
                > diminutives, “-k-“ and “-l-“. All Senjecan verb roots are monosyllabic, of
                > the form (C)(V)VC-. If I add a diminutive suffix to the verb root, I can
                > convey the idea of gently, easily, leisurely, partially, etc. Thus,
                > “néða”, walk, can be changed to “néðla”, stroll. The speakers of Senjecas
                > prefer “-l-“ to “-k-“, but “-k-“ would be used to avoid a geminate
                > consonant: “dila”, disclose, reveal, manifest > “dilka”, hint, imply,
                > insinuate. Lenition may be necessary: “tééda”, burn [of the sun] >
                > “tééðla”, tan.
                > BTW, “hike” is translated by a compound verb that I don’t find so
                > cumbersome: “ȝúta”, wander, and néða”, walk, > ȝuþnéða”.
                > Charlie
                >

                Actually, I like this idea a lot, especially since, like Senjecas, Moten
                allows diminutive suffixes on verbs too (the diminutive suffix _-sin_ can
                be used on both nouns and verbs, unlike _-mas_ and _-zes_ which can only be
                used on nouns –or rather can only *result* in nouns–), as in for instance
                _jeksi|n_: "to brush past" from _jeksaj_: "to touch, to hit". So I decided
                to shamelessly copy you and created the verb _jugzi|n_: "to stroll, to talk
                a walk", diminutive of _jugejugej_: "to walk". They are also used
                nominally: while _ugejuge_ can mean "stroll", it's usually more generic and
                means "walk", while _ugzin_ is more specifically "stroll, leisurely walk".
                You get inspired by me, and I get inspired back by you, the circle is
                complete! :)

                I love this list :P.
                --
                Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

                http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
                http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
              • Padraic Brown
                ... Neat. I ve gotten my wife to do this in Waray-Waray a bit too. I ll say mahagcotcito for it s a bit chilly or pagtaktaktito or pagmartilito for tap. ...
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 19, 2013
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                  >> If I add a diminutive suffix to the verb root, I can convey the idea of gently,
                  >> easily, leisurely, partially, etc.  Thus, “néða”, walk, can be changed to “néðla”,
                  >> stroll. 
                  >
                  >Actually, I like this idea a lot, especially since, like Senjecas, Moten
                  >allows diminutive suffixes on verbs too (the diminutive suffix _-sin_ can
                  >be used on both nouns and verbs, unlike _-mas_ and _-zes_ which can only be
                  >used on nouns –or rather can only *result* in nouns–), as in for instance
                  >_jeksi|n_: "to brush past" from _jeksaj_: "to touch, to hit".


                  Neat. I've gotten my wife to do this in Waray-Waray a bit too. I'll say
                  mahagcotcito for it's a bit chilly or pagtaktaktito or pagmartilito for tap.


                  > So I decided
                  >to shamelessly copy you and created the verb _jugzi|n_: "to stroll, to talk
                  >a walk",


                  Take a walk or actually talk a walk? ;)


                  >diminutive of _jugejugej_: "to walk". They are also used
                  >nominally: while _ugejuge_ can mean "stroll", it's usually more generic and
                  >means "walk", while _ugzin_ is more specifically "stroll, leisurely walk".
                  >You get inspired by me, and I get inspired back by you, the circle is
                  >complete! :)

                  Funny how these threads weave all throughout our experiences. When we say

                  gusto mo pagsyadita, that's asking if you want to go for a stroll. Going for a
                  walk, of course, is pagwawalk.


                  Of course, all of these have some kind of Spanish diminutive: -tito, -cito and
                  the like.

                  Padraic


                  >I love this list :P.
                  >--
                  >Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.
                  >
                  >http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
                  >http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
                  >
                  >
                • C. Brickner
                  I love this list :P. -- Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets. _____________________________ My sentiments exactly! Charlie
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 19, 2013
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                    I love this list :P.
                    --
                    Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.
                    _____________________________

                    My sentiments exactly!

                    Charlie
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