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USAGE: New english conjunction?

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  • DM
    Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday; http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/ It
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 6, 2013
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      Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday;

      http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/

      It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use slash in
      this manner as well! What do those of the list think?
    • Zach Wellstood
      I find this quite interesting. The only thing is that I ve **never* *heard someone say this aloud, nor have I ever seen anyone write it out like that. I m used
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 6, 2013
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        I find this quite interesting. The only thing is that I've **never* *heard
        someone say this aloud, nor have I ever seen anyone write it out like that.
        I'm used to things like "and/or" and have noticed that the meaning of the
        slash isn't quite the same as "and" or "or," but I find it bizarre that, if
        this word is becoming as ubiquitous as the author claims, I still haven't
        heard it. If it's a generational thing, I'm 19....so I feel like I ought to
        have heard it among my fellow young people. Maybe it's in an even younger
        generation?

        The only times I would imagine hearing it spoken is when a friend is
        speaking facetiously, but in that case a lot of typically novel or
        ungrammatical utterances are okay. (I'm thinking of Tumblr stereotypes: "I
        can't even." / "I've got so many feels." etc.) When speaking in that way,
        I've noticed my friends flout grammaticality a little bit, but the
        discourse's participants need to be right for it. If speaking to someone
        who's out of touch with that particular style of speaking, people won't use
        it because it sounds ungrammatical to them. So, I wonder where exactly
        spoken and written "slash" is becoming so popular. Still interesting to
        think about!

        As for the new use she mentioned, I've not heard that either and it's not
        something I would say or write.

        I'm also interested in what others on the list have to say or if anyone's
        actually heard this.

        Zach


        On Fri, Sep 6, 2013 at 2:40 PM, DM <decadent.muffin@...> wrote:

        > Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday;
        >
        >
        > http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/
        >
        > It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use slash in
        > this manner as well! What do those of the list think?
        >



        --
        raa'lalí 'aa! - [sirisaá! <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conlang>]
      • Andrej Schütz
        Pretty interesting. As a non-native English speaker, I have heard it (from native English speakers) and sometimes I do use it, both in written language (but
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 6, 2013
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          Pretty interesting. As a non-native English speaker, I have heard it (from
          native English speakers) and sometimes I do use it, both in written
          language (but only as "/") and in spoken language. Although I was only
          aware of the first use where it replaces "and", "or" or "and/or", the other
          types were new to me as well.

          The use of "slash" has even found its way into my native language, Slovene,
          as "sleš". People use it in spoken and written language, but the use is
          mainly restricted to replacing "and" (or "or" or "and/or").




          2013/9/6 Zach Wellstood <zwellstood@...>

          > I find this quite interesting. The only thing is that I've **never* *heard
          > someone say this aloud, nor have I ever seen anyone write it out like that.
          > I'm used to things like "and/or" and have noticed that the meaning of the
          > slash isn't quite the same as "and" or "or," but I find it bizarre that, if
          > this word is becoming as ubiquitous as the author claims, I still haven't
          > heard it. If it's a generational thing, I'm 19....so I feel like I ought to
          > have heard it among my fellow young people. Maybe it's in an even younger
          > generation?
          >
          > The only times I would imagine hearing it spoken is when a friend is
          > speaking facetiously, but in that case a lot of typically novel or
          > ungrammatical utterances are okay. (I'm thinking of Tumblr stereotypes: "I
          > can't even." / "I've got so many feels." etc.) When speaking in that way,
          > I've noticed my friends flout grammaticality a little bit, but the
          > discourse's participants need to be right for it. If speaking to someone
          > who's out of touch with that particular style of speaking, people won't use
          > it because it sounds ungrammatical to them. So, I wonder where exactly
          > spoken and written "slash" is becoming so popular. Still interesting to
          > think about!
          >
          > As for the new use she mentioned, I've not heard that either and it's not
          > something I would say or write.
          >
          > I'm also interested in what others on the list have to say or if anyone's
          > actually heard this.
          >
          > Zach
          >
          >
          > On Fri, Sep 6, 2013 at 2:40 PM, DM <decadent.muffin@...> wrote:
          >
          > > Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday;
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/
          > >
          > > It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use slash
          > in
          > > this manner as well! What do those of the list think?
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > --
          > raa'lalí 'aa! - [sirisaá! <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conlang>]
          >



          --
          The future is predetermined by the character of those who shape it.
          Prihodnost vnaprej določajo karakterji tistih, ki jo oblikujejo.
        • Andrej Schütz
          I decided to do a quick search for the use of / and Wiktionary appears to acknowledge its use as a conjunction: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki// I also found
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 6, 2013
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            I decided to do a quick search for the use of "/" and Wiktionary appears to
            acknowledge its use as a conjunction: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki//

            I also found it in the first episode of The Big Bang Theory, which dates
            back to 2007 so it looks like the use of the punctuation as a conjunction
            in spoken language has been on the rise for quite some time now. Here's the
            video: http://youtu.be/bJDkKjjkPnE?t=1m50s


            2013/9/6 Andrej Schütz <ashucky@...>

            > Pretty interesting. As a non-native English speaker, I have heard it (from
            > native English speakers) and sometimes I do use it, both in written
            > language (but only as "/") and in spoken language. Although I was only
            > aware of the first use where it replaces "and", "or" or "and/or", the other
            > types were new to me as well.
            >
            > The use of "slash" has even found its way into my native language,
            > Slovene, as "sleš". People use it in spoken and written language, but the
            > use is mainly restricted to replacing "and" (or "or" or "and/or").
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > 2013/9/6 Zach Wellstood <zwellstood@...>
            >
            >> I find this quite interesting. The only thing is that I've **never* *heard
            >> someone say this aloud, nor have I ever seen anyone write it out like
            >> that.
            >> I'm used to things like "and/or" and have noticed that the meaning of the
            >> slash isn't quite the same as "and" or "or," but I find it bizarre that,
            >> if
            >> this word is becoming as ubiquitous as the author claims, I still haven't
            >> heard it. If it's a generational thing, I'm 19....so I feel like I ought
            >> to
            >> have heard it among my fellow young people. Maybe it's in an even younger
            >> generation?
            >>
            >> The only times I would imagine hearing it spoken is when a friend is
            >> speaking facetiously, but in that case a lot of typically novel or
            >> ungrammatical utterances are okay. (I'm thinking of Tumblr stereotypes: "I
            >> can't even." / "I've got so many feels." etc.) When speaking in that way,
            >> I've noticed my friends flout grammaticality a little bit, but the
            >> discourse's participants need to be right for it. If speaking to someone
            >> who's out of touch with that particular style of speaking, people won't
            >> use
            >> it because it sounds ungrammatical to them. So, I wonder where exactly
            >> spoken and written "slash" is becoming so popular. Still interesting to
            >> think about!
            >>
            >> As for the new use she mentioned, I've not heard that either and it's not
            >> something I would say or write.
            >>
            >> I'm also interested in what others on the list have to say or if anyone's
            >> actually heard this.
            >>
            >> Zach
            >>
            >>
            >> On Fri, Sep 6, 2013 at 2:40 PM, DM <decadent.muffin@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> > Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday;
            >> >
            >> >
            >> >
            >> http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/
            >> >
            >> > It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use slash
            >> in
            >> > this manner as well! What do those of the list think?
            >> >
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >> --
            >> raa'lalí 'aa! - [sirisaá! <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conlang>]
            >>
            >
            >
            >
            > --
            > The future is predetermined by the character of those who shape it.
            > Prihodnost vnaprej določajo karakterji tistih, ki jo oblikujejo.
            >



            --
            The future is predetermined by the character of those who shape it.
            Prihodnost vnaprej določajo karakterji tistih, ki jo oblikujejo.
          • H. S. Teoh
            ... [...] I actually hear slash pronounced in speech fairly often, in phrases like that s her boss slash ex-boyfriend , that s a printer slash scanner
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 6, 2013
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              On Fri, Sep 06, 2013 at 03:16:11PM -0400, Zach Wellstood wrote:
              > I find this quite interesting. The only thing is that I've **never*
              > *heard someone say this aloud, nor have I ever seen anyone write it
              > out like that. I'm used to things like "and/or" and have noticed that
              > the meaning of the slash isn't quite the same as "and" or "or," but I
              > find it bizarre that, if this word is becoming as ubiquitous as the
              > author claims, I still haven't heard it. If it's a generational thing,
              > I'm 19....so I feel like I ought to have heard it among my fellow
              > young people. Maybe it's in an even younger generation?
              >
              > The only times I would imagine hearing it spoken is when a friend is
              > speaking facetiously, but in that case a lot of typically novel or
              > ungrammatical utterances are okay. (I'm thinking of Tumblr
              > stereotypes: "I can't even." / "I've got so many feels." etc.) When
              > speaking in that way, I've noticed my friends flout grammaticality a
              > little bit, but the discourse's participants need to be right for it.
              > If speaking to someone who's out of touch with that particular style
              > of speaking, people won't use it because it sounds ungrammatical to
              > them. So, I wonder where exactly spoken and written "slash" is
              > becoming so popular. Still interesting to think about!
              >
              > As for the new use she mentioned, I've not heard that either and it's
              > not something I would say or write.
              >
              > I'm also interested in what others on the list have to say or if
              > anyone's actually heard this.
              [...]

              I actually hear "slash" pronounced in speech fairly often, in phrases
              like "that's her boss slash ex-boyfriend", "that's a printer slash
              scanner slash fax machine". I hardly (if ever) say it myself, but my
              wife says it pretty often, and so do many others around me.

              It may be a regional thing.


              T

              --
              Маленькие детки - маленькие бедки.
            • Matthew George
              Formerly the slash was sort of a glottal stop, but I ve increasingly heard it said explicitly. Same with air quotes, which formerly were mostly a matter of
              Message 6 of 17 , Sep 6, 2013
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                Formerly the 'slash' was sort of a glottal stop, but I've increasingly
                heard it said explicitly. Same with air quotes, which formerly were mostly
                a matter of intonation in speech and are now sometimes used as a phrase.

                Matt G.
              • Leonardo Castro
                / is used in this way in Portuguese too (probably in many other languages), and frequently pronounced as barra (but never pronounced in e/ou [and/or]).
                Message 7 of 17 , Sep 6, 2013
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                  / is used in this way in Portuguese too (probably in many other
                  languages), and frequently pronounced as "barra" (but never pronounced
                  in "e/ou" [and/or]).

                  Até mais!

                  Leonardo


                  2013/9/6 DM <decadent.muffin@...>:
                  > Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday;
                  >
                  > http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/
                  >
                  > It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use slash in
                  > this manner as well! What do those of the list think?
                • Adam Walker
                  All the uses up to number 7 are quite familiar to me. At that point I was totally weirded out. I will so be looking out for this now, slash won t I look cool
                  Message 8 of 17 , Sep 6, 2013
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                    All the uses up to number 7 are quite familiar to me. At that point I was
                    totally weirded out. I will so be looking out for this now, slash won't I
                    look cool when I know how to use it slash don't have to ask about it.

                    Adam


                    On Fri, Sep 6, 2013 at 1:40 PM, DM <decadent.muffin@...> wrote:

                    > Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday;
                    >
                    >
                    > http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/
                    >
                    > It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use slash in
                    > this manner as well! What do those of the list think?
                    >
                  • Padraic Brown
                    ... Interesting. On the one hand, mostly what s going on here, as I see it, is that we re now breaking the tetragrammaton tabu . Where before people would
                    Message 9 of 17 , Sep 6, 2013
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                      > Interesting article came up in my
                      > Ling 101 class yesterday;

                      > http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/

                      > It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use slash in
                      > this manner as well! What do those of the list think?

                      Interesting. On the one hand, mostly what's going on here, as I see it, is that we're now
                      breaking the "tetragrammaton tabu". Where before people would speak some circumlocution,
                      like "and" or "and or" or "then" or some other word appropriate to the moment whenever they
                      came to a "/" in writing, we're now *speaking* as well as *writing* the conjunction's name. This
                      is kind of like saying "and" when I see "&", or perhaps "indeed" when I see "--" on the page.
                      On the other hand, as far as examples 7 through 12 go, it seems to me this is an extension of
                      the list enumeration powers that "slash" has long had. Traditionally, "slash" has been used to
                      separate items (like the "request / require" example), as members of a list; now, they're
                      extending that power to all the random bits of stream of conscious items (like the saw alex slash
                      chubbed a cooky example) that have become to the modern echild the uttermost deeps of
                      profundity.

                      In other words, "/" has been a latent conjunction for years; but now it's True Name is being
                      more frequently spoken and it is taking it's place among the constellation of other long
                      established conjunctions.

                      I'm sure the prescriptivists are shocked and horrified slash preparing their diatribes against this
                      newly revealed conjunction. Closed class, schmlosed class!

                      Padraic
                    • Toms Deimonds Barvidis
                      I m nineteen too and a native speaker of Latvian and I ve been using slash in at least some of the senses in English for a few years now and it s slowly
                      Message 10 of 17 , Sep 7, 2013
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                        I'm nineteen too and a native speaker of Latvian and I've been using "slash" in at least some of the senses in English
                        for a few years now and it's slowly creeping into my Latvian, too. The way I say pronounce it in Latvian is pretty
                        much the same as in English [sl{S]. I don't always write it in either language but when I do, I use the English spelling
                        exclusively.

                        --
                        Toms Deimonds Barvidis

                        Citējot Andrej Schütz <ashucky@...> :
                        > Pretty interesting. As a non-native English speaker, I have heard it (from
                        > native English speakers) and sometimes I do use it, both in written
                        > language (but only as "/") and in spoken language. Although I was only
                        > aware of the first use where it replaces "and", "or" or "and/or", the other
                        > types were new to me as well.
                        >
                        > The use of "slash" has even found its way into my native language, Slovene,
                        > as "sleš". People use it in spoken and written language, but the use is
                        > mainly restricted to replacing "and" (or "or" or "and/or").
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > 2013/9/6 Zach Wellstood <zwellstood@...>
                        >
                        > > I find this quite interesting. The only thing is that I've **never* *heard
                        > > someone say this aloud, nor have I ever seen anyone write it out like that.
                        > > I'm used to things like "and/or" and have noticed that the meaning of the
                        > > slash isn't quite the same as "and" or "or," but I find it bizarre that, if
                        > > this word is becoming as ubiquitous as the author claims, I still haven't
                        > > heard it. If it's a generational thing, I'm 19....so I feel like I ought to
                        > > have heard it among my fellow young people. Maybe it's in an even younger
                        > > generation?
                        > >
                        > > The only times I would imagine hearing it spoken is when a friend is
                        > > speaking facetiously, but in that case a lot of typically novel or
                        > > ungrammatical utterances are okay. (I'm thinking of Tumblr stereotypes: "I
                        > > can't even." / "I've got so many feels." etc.) When speaking in that way,
                        > > I've noticed my friends flout grammaticality a little bit, but the
                        > > discourse's participants need to be right for it. If speaking to someone
                        > > who's out of touch with that particular style of speaking, people won't use
                        > > it because it sounds ungrammatical to them. So, I wonder where exactly
                        > > spoken and written "slash" is becoming so popular. Still interesting to
                        > > think about!
                        > >
                        > > As for the new use she mentioned, I've not heard that either and it's not
                        > > something I would say or write.
                        > >
                        > > I'm also interested in what others on the list have to say or if anyone's
                        > > actually heard this.
                        > >
                        > > Zach
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > On Fri, Sep 6, 2013 at 2:40 PM, DM <decadent.muffin@...> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > > Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday;
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/
                        > > >
                        > > > It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use slash
                        > > in
                        > > > this manner as well! What do those of the list think?
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --
                        > > raa'lalí 'aa! - [sirisaá! <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conlang>]
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --
                        > The future is predetermined by the character of those who shape it.
                        > Prihodnost vnaprej določajo karakterji tistih, ki jo oblikujejo.
                      • Ian Spolarich
                        While I am familiar with the usages of slash in speech as a conjunction, I m not familiar with the examples where it is used at the start of a sentence. And
                        Message 11 of 17 , Sep 7, 2013
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                          While I am familiar with the usages of "slash" in speech as a conjunction,
                          I'm not familiar with the examples where it is used at the start of a
                          sentence. And I also have never seen it completely written out. I would be
                          much more likely to write "going to the party / see you soon" instead of
                          "going to the party slash see you soon".

                          I also was not aware of its usage as a conjunction--what a pleasant
                          surprise!


                          On 7 September 2013 05:38, Toms Deimonds Barvidis <emopunk14@...>wrote:

                          > I'm nineteen too and a native speaker of Latvian and I've been using
                          > "slash" in at least some of the senses in English
                          > for a few years now and it's slowly creeping into my Latvian, too. The way
                          > I say pronounce it in Latvian is pretty
                          > much the same as in English [sl{S]. I don't always write it in either
                          > language but when I do, I use the English spelling
                          > exclusively.
                          >
                          > --
                          > Toms Deimonds Barvidis
                          >
                          > Citējot Andrej Schütz <ashucky@...> :
                          > > Pretty interesting. As a non-native English speaker, I have heard it
                          > (from
                          > > native English speakers) and sometimes I do use it, both in written
                          > > language (but only as "/") and in spoken language. Although I was only
                          > > aware of the first use where it replaces "and", "or" or "and/or", the
                          > other
                          > > types were new to me as well.
                          > >
                          > > The use of "slash" has even found its way into my native language,
                          > Slovene,
                          > > as "sleš". People use it in spoken and written language, but the use is
                          > > mainly restricted to replacing "and" (or "or" or "and/or").
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > 2013/9/6 Zach Wellstood <zwellstood@...>
                          > >
                          > > > I find this quite interesting. The only thing is that I've **never*
                          > *heard
                          > > > someone say this aloud, nor have I ever seen anyone write it out like
                          > that.
                          > > > I'm used to things like "and/or" and have noticed that the meaning of
                          > the
                          > > > slash isn't quite the same as "and" or "or," but I find it bizarre
                          > that, if
                          > > > this word is becoming as ubiquitous as the author claims, I still
                          > haven't
                          > > > heard it. If it's a generational thing, I'm 19....so I feel like I
                          > ought to
                          > > > have heard it among my fellow young people. Maybe it's in an even
                          > younger
                          > > > generation?
                          > > >
                          > > > The only times I would imagine hearing it spoken is when a friend is
                          > > > speaking facetiously, but in that case a lot of typically novel or
                          > > > ungrammatical utterances are okay. (I'm thinking of Tumblr
                          > stereotypes: "I
                          > > > can't even." / "I've got so many feels." etc.) When speaking in that
                          > way,
                          > > > I've noticed my friends flout grammaticality a little bit, but the
                          > > > discourse's participants need to be right for it. If speaking to
                          > someone
                          > > > who's out of touch with that particular style of speaking, people
                          > won't use
                          > > > it because it sounds ungrammatical to them. So, I wonder where exactly
                          > > > spoken and written "slash" is becoming so popular. Still interesting
                          > to
                          > > > think about!
                          > > >
                          > > > As for the new use she mentioned, I've not heard that either and it's
                          > not
                          > > > something I would say or write.
                          > > >
                          > > > I'm also interested in what others on the list have to say or if
                          > anyone's
                          > > > actually heard this.
                          > > >
                          > > > Zach
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > On Fri, Sep 6, 2013 at 2:40 PM, DM <decadent.muffin@...> wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > > Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday;
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/
                          > > > >
                          > > > > It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use
                          > slash
                          > > > in
                          > > > > this manner as well! What do those of the list think?
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > > > --
                          > > > raa'lalí 'aa! - [sirisaá! <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conlang>]
                          > > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > --
                          > > The future is predetermined by the character of those who shape it.
                          > > Prihodnost vnaprej določajo karakterji tistih, ki jo oblikujejo.
                          >
                        • Ben Felix
                          Doing my assignments slash reading this stuff. It is so interesting! I love it! Slash, I find myself wanting to use the word slash more often!
                          Message 12 of 17 , Sep 8, 2013
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                            Doing my assignments slash reading this stuff. It is so interesting! I love
                            it! Slash, I find myself wanting to use the word 'slash' more often!


                            On Sun, Sep 8, 2013 at 5:11 AM, Ian Spolarich <mouton9113@...> wrote:

                            > While I am familiar with the usages of "slash" in speech as a conjunction,
                            > I'm not familiar with the examples where it is used at the start of a
                            > sentence. And I also have never seen it completely written out. I would be
                            > much more likely to write "going to the party / see you soon" instead of
                            > "going to the party slash see you soon".
                            >
                            > I also was not aware of its usage as a conjunction--what a pleasant
                            > surprise!
                            >
                            >
                            > On 7 September 2013 05:38, Toms Deimonds Barvidis <emopunk14@...
                            > >wrote:
                            >
                            > > I'm nineteen too and a native speaker of Latvian and I've been using
                            > > "slash" in at least some of the senses in English
                            > > for a few years now and it's slowly creeping into my Latvian, too. The
                            > way
                            > > I say pronounce it in Latvian is pretty
                            > > much the same as in English [sl{S]. I don't always write it in either
                            > > language but when I do, I use the English spelling
                            > > exclusively.
                            > >
                            > > --
                            > > Toms Deimonds Barvidis
                            > >
                            > > Citējot Andrej Schütz <ashucky@...> :
                            > > > Pretty interesting. As a non-native English speaker, I have heard it
                            > > (from
                            > > > native English speakers) and sometimes I do use it, both in written
                            > > > language (but only as "/") and in spoken language. Although I was only
                            > > > aware of the first use where it replaces "and", "or" or "and/or", the
                            > > other
                            > > > types were new to me as well.
                            > > >
                            > > > The use of "slash" has even found its way into my native language,
                            > > Slovene,
                            > > > as "sleš". People use it in spoken and written language, but the use
                            > is
                            > > > mainly restricted to replacing "and" (or "or" or "and/or").
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > 2013/9/6 Zach Wellstood <zwellstood@...>
                            > > >
                            > > > > I find this quite interesting. The only thing is that I've **never*
                            > > *heard
                            > > > > someone say this aloud, nor have I ever seen anyone write it out
                            > like
                            > > that.
                            > > > > I'm used to things like "and/or" and have noticed that the meaning
                            > of
                            > > the
                            > > > > slash isn't quite the same as "and" or "or," but I find it bizarre
                            > > that, if
                            > > > > this word is becoming as ubiquitous as the author claims, I still
                            > > haven't
                            > > > > heard it. If it's a generational thing, I'm 19....so I feel like I
                            > > ought to
                            > > > > have heard it among my fellow young people. Maybe it's in an even
                            > > younger
                            > > > > generation?
                            > > > >
                            > > > > The only times I would imagine hearing it spoken is when a friend is
                            > > > > speaking facetiously, but in that case a lot of typically novel or
                            > > > > ungrammatical utterances are okay. (I'm thinking of Tumblr
                            > > stereotypes: "I
                            > > > > can't even." / "I've got so many feels." etc.) When speaking in that
                            > > way,
                            > > > > I've noticed my friends flout grammaticality a little bit, but the
                            > > > > discourse's participants need to be right for it. If speaking to
                            > > someone
                            > > > > who's out of touch with that particular style of speaking, people
                            > > won't use
                            > > > > it because it sounds ungrammatical to them. So, I wonder where
                            > exactly
                            > > > > spoken and written "slash" is becoming so popular. Still interesting
                            > > to
                            > > > > think about!
                            > > > >
                            > > > > As for the new use she mentioned, I've not heard that either and
                            > it's
                            > > not
                            > > > > something I would say or write.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > I'm also interested in what others on the list have to say or if
                            > > anyone's
                            > > > > actually heard this.
                            > > > >
                            > > > > Zach
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > On Fri, Sep 6, 2013 at 2:40 PM, DM <decadent.muffin@...>
                            > wrote:
                            > > > >
                            > > > > > Interesting article came up in my Ling 101 class yesterday;
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > >
                            > http://chronicle.com/blogs/linguafranca/2013/04/24/slash-not-just-a-punctuation-mark-anymore/
                            > > > > >
                            > > > > > It was only after reading it that I realized I subconsciously use
                            > > slash
                            > > > > in
                            > > > > > this manner as well! What do those of the list think?
                            > > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > >
                            > > > > --
                            > > > > raa'lalí 'aa! - [sirisaá! <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conlang>]
                            > > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > >
                            > > > --
                            > > > The future is predetermined by the character of those who shape it.
                            > > > Prihodnost vnaprej določajo karakterji tistih, ki jo oblikujejo.
                            > >
                            >
                          • BPJ
                            ... I sometimes use a single/double lateral click as spoken single/double quotes, usually without any closing quote . The strange thing is that AFAIK I ve
                            Message 13 of 17 , Sep 8, 2013
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                              2013-09-06 22:19, Matthew George skrev:
                              > Formerly the 'slash' was sort of a glottal stop, but I've increasingly
                              > heard it said explicitly. Same with air quotes, which formerly were mostly
                              > a matter of intonation in speech and are now sometimes used as a phrase.
                              >
                              > Matt G.
                              >

                              I sometimes use a single/double lateral click as spoken
                              single/double quotes, usually without any closing 'quote'.
                              The strange thing is that AFAIK I've never met another
                              person who does this, except when imitating me, yet everyone
                              seems to instantly get what I mean, since I've got some
                              positive as well as negative comments over the years.

                              As for 'slash' I hear it spoken quite a bit here in Sweden,
                              always meaning 'and', 'or' or 'and/or', and usually the latter.
                              NB this is a loanword _slash_ /slɛʂ/. When reading out an URL or
                              filepath Swedish speakers usually say _slash_ too, although
                              the character as punctuation is still usually called
                              _snedstreck_ lit. 'slanted stroke'. The '\' character, which
                              used to be unknown here is usually called _bakstreck_ lit.
                              'back-stroke'. Nobody uses the official _bakåtvänt
                              snedstreck_ 'backwards-turned slanted stroke'; even the
                              Swedish Language Council's style rules uses _bakstreck_ as
                              the first alternative in its index!

                              BTW I've heard '|' called _pinne_ 'stick' but also _pajp_ (though
                              I never actually saw it so spelled! :-) and _påle_ 'pole'. I
                              think I'm the last one calling it _lod(streck)_ lit.
                              'lead(stroke)'. Those young'uns don't even know what a _lod_
                              is, of course!

                              /bpj
                            • Daniel Bowman
                              I had never noticed the use of slash as a conjunction till this thread came up, but it is certainly part of my wife s idiolect (but not mine, I think). We
                              Message 14 of 17 , Sep 8, 2013
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                                I had never noticed the use of "slash" as a conjunction till this thread
                                came up, but it is certainly part of my wife's idiolect (but not mine, I
                                think). We are both native English speakers from the American Midwest and
                                Southwest, respectively. I wonder if this conjunction has arisen from text
                                messaging?


                                2013/9/8 BPJ <bpj@...>

                                > 2013-09-06 22:19, Matthew George skrev:
                                > > Formerly the 'slash' was sort of a glottal stop, but I've increasingly
                                > > heard it said explicitly. Same with air quotes, which formerly were
                                > mostly
                                > > a matter of intonation in speech and are now sometimes used as a phrase.
                                > >
                                > > Matt G.
                                > >
                                >
                                > I sometimes use a single/double lateral click as spoken
                                > single/double quotes, usually without any closing 'quote'.
                                > The strange thing is that AFAIK I've never met another
                                > person who does this, except when imitating me, yet everyone
                                > seems to instantly get what I mean, since I've got some
                                > positive as well as negative comments over the years.
                                >
                                > As for 'slash' I hear it spoken quite a bit here in Sweden,
                                > always meaning 'and', 'or' or 'and/or', and usually the latter.
                                > NB this is a loanword _slash_ /slɛʂ/. When reading out an URL or
                                > filepath Swedish speakers usually say _slash_ too, although
                                > the character as punctuation is still usually called
                                > _snedstreck_ lit. 'slanted stroke'. The '\' character, which
                                > used to be unknown here is usually called _bakstreck_ lit.
                                > 'back-stroke'. Nobody uses the official _bakåtvänt
                                > snedstreck_ 'backwards-turned slanted stroke'; even the
                                > Swedish Language Council's style rules uses _bakstreck_ as
                                > the first alternative in its index!
                                >
                                > BTW I've heard '|' called _pinne_ 'stick' but also _pajp_ (though
                                > I never actually saw it so spelled! :-) and _påle_ 'pole'. I
                                > think I'm the last one calling it _lod(streck)_ lit.
                                > 'lead(stroke)'. Those young'uns don't even know what a _lod_
                                > is, of course!
                                >
                                > /bpj
                                >
                              • Padraic Brown
                                ... Hm. Do you do this anywhere quotation marks might show up? Like: Well, I m telling you Chris, John said kc-kc any time he needs anything at all... Or
                                Message 15 of 17 , Sep 8, 2013
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                                  > I sometimes use a single/double lateral click as spoken

                                  > single/double quotes, usually without any closing 'quote'.
                                  > The strange thing is that AFAIK I've never met another
                                  > person who does this, except when imitating me, yet everyone
                                  > seems to instantly get what I mean, since I've got some
                                  > positive as well as negative comments over the years.

                                  Hm. Do you do this anywhere quotation marks might show up?
                                  Like: "Well, I'm telling you Chris, John said kc-kc any time he
                                  needs anything at all..." Or just in the half-sarcastic places one
                                  might use air-quotes, like: "Oh, yeah, he's taking kc-kc medication
                                  for his kc-kc little problem!"

                                  I wouldn't do this myself, but would understand you pretty
                                  immediately if I heard you say it.

                                  > As for 'slash' I hear it spoken quite a bit here in Sweden,
                                  > always meaning 'and', 'or' or 'and/or', and usually the
                                  > latter.
                                  > NB this is a loanword _slash_ /slɛʂ/. When reading out an URL or
                                  > filepath Swedish speakers usually say _slash_ too, although
                                  > the character as punctuation is still usually called
                                  > _snedstreck_ lit. 'slanted stroke'.

                                  Perhaps folk see snedstreck as the usual punctuation, but, along with
                                  English speaking computer / internet technology came the English
                                  word, and both are seen as foreign.

                                  > BTW I've heard '|' called _pinne_ 'stick' but also _pajp_
                                  > (though
                                  > I never actually saw it so spelled! :-) and _påle_ 'pole'. I
                                  > think I'm the last one calling it _lod(streck)_ lit.
                                  > 'lead(stroke)'. Those young'uns don't even know what a _lod_
                                  > is, of course!

                                  I didn't even know it had a name!

                                  Padraic

                                  > /bpj
                                • Roger Mills
                                  From: BPJ I sometimes use a single/double lateral click as spoken single/double quotes, usually without any closing quote . The strange thing
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Sep 8, 2013
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                                    From: BPJ <bpj@...>



                                    I sometimes use a single/double lateral click as spoken
                                    single/double quotes, usually without any closing 'quote'.
                                    The strange thing is that AFAIK I've never met another
                                    person who does this, except when imitating me, yet everyone
                                    seems to instantly get what I mean, since I've got some
                                    positive as well as negative comments over the years.

                                    RM (Ancient History Dept.) YEARS AGO, the Danish pianist/humorist Victor Borge had a bit with "spoken" punctuation marks. IIRC, those clicks were used for single/double quotes. Plus a lot of others that I disremember.
                                  • Allison Swenson
                                    You know, I didn t realize that I say the word slash until I read this... Now that it s been brought to mind, however, I realize I do indeed say it aloud.
                                    Message 17 of 17 , Sep 9, 2013
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                                      You know, I didn't realize that I say the word "slash" until I read this...

                                      Now that it's been brought to mind, however, I realize I do indeed say it
                                      aloud. Not commonly, and more often than not with a somewhat sarcastic
                                      edge, but I do use it. In my own speech, I think it tends to have the
                                      meaning of either "in other words" (example 4) or simply "and/or" (examples
                                      1 through 3), but in writing I think I do use it in a similar way to the
                                      later examples given.

                                      I would never use it at the beginning of a sentence, though. That just
                                      seems... very odd to me. And I confess it sounds very "teenager". Granted,
                                      I'm not all that far out of being a teenager myself, but it has that
                                      feeling to me.

                                      Well, I guess it's something to keep an eye on. I'll use my usual test to
                                      tell whether or not it's a "real" word--whether or not my mother uses it! I
                                      knew "to google" had finally made it when she used it all on her own...
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