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To diss

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  • C. Brickner
    Hi! While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary.   The article gave the
    Message 1 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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      Hi!

      While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary.   The article gave the translation of “diss” into several languages.



      I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”, while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.



      I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation.   I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work.   El me dissó???



      But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.



      Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for disrespect or disparage .





       

      Charlie
    • Daniel Myers
      One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused when I suggested the past tense of diss should be dast . - Doc
      Message 2 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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        One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused when
        I suggested the past tense of "diss" should be "dast".

        - Doc


        > -------- Original Message --------
        > From: "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...>
        > Date: Wed, September 04, 2013 12:41 pm
        >
        > Hi!
        >
        > While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary.   The article gave the translation of “diss” into several languages.
        >
        > I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”, while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.
        >
        > I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation.   I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work.   El me dissó???
        >
        > But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
        >
        > Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for disrespect or disparage .
        >
        > Charlie
      • C. Brickner
        dissen, dass, gedoten or maybe dissen, dußte, gedußt Charlie ... One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused when I suggested the
        Message 3 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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          dissen, dass, gedoten

          or maybe

          dissen, dußte, gedußt

          Charlie
          ----- Original Message -----

          One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused when
          I suggested the past tense of "diss" should be "dast".

          - Doc


          > -------- Original Message --------
          > From: "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...>
          > Date: Wed, September 04, 2013 12:41 pm
          >
          > Hi!
          >
          > While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary.   The article gave the translation of “diss” into several languages.
          >
          > I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”, while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.
          >
          > I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation.   I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work.   El me dissó???
          >
          > But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
          >
          > Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for disrespect or disparage .
          >
          > Charlie
        • Anaïs Ahmed
          Ich deiß, du deißt, usw?
          Message 4 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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            Ich deiß, du deißt, usw?

            "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 12.10:

            > dissen, dass, gedoten
            >
            > or maybe
            >
            > dissen, dußte, gedußt
            >
            > Charlie
            > ----- Original Message -----
            >
            > One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused when
            > I suggested the past tense of "diss" should be "dast".
            >
            > - Doc
            >
            >
            >> -------- Original Message --------
            >> From: "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...>
            >> Date: Wed, September 04, 2013 12:41 pm
            >>
            >> Hi!
            >>
            >> While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary. The article gave the translation of “diss” into several languages.
            >>
            >> I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”, while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.
            >>
            >> I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation. I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work. El me dissó???
            >>
            >> But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
            >>
            >> Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for disrespect or disparage .
            >>
            >> Charlie
          • C. Brickner
            I m no German scholar, but I doubt that. It s a brand new verb and wouldn t have those irregular vowel changes. Ich disse, tu dissest, er disst, wir dissen,
            Message 5 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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              I'm no German scholar, but I doubt that. It's a brand new verb and wouldn't have those irregular vowel changes.
              Ich disse, tu dissest, er disst, wir dissen, ihr disset, sie dissen

              I guess???

              Charlie

              ----- Original Message -----
              Ich deiß, du deißt, usw?

              "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 12.10:

              > dissen, dass, gedoten
              >
              > or maybe
              >
              > dissen, dußte, gedußt
              >
              > Charlie
              > ----- Original Message -----
              >
              > One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused when
              > I suggested the past tense of "diss" should be "dast".
              >
              > - Doc
              >
              >
              >> -------- Original Message --------
              >> From: "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...>
              >> Date: Wed, September 04, 2013 12:41 pm
              >>
              >> Hi!
              >>
              >> While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary. The article gave the translation of “diss” into several languages.
              >>
              >> I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”, while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.
              >>
              >> I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation. I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work. El me dissó???
              >>
              >> But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
              >>
              >> Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for disrespect or disparage .
              >>
              >> Charlie
            • Daniel Prohaska
              Nooo, I(ch/ik) diss(e), du disst, er/sie/es disst, wir/sie dissen, ihr disst... Sent from my iPhone
              Message 6 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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                Nooo,

                I(ch/ik) diss(e), du disst, er/sie/es disst, wir/sie dissen, ihr disst...

                Sent from my iPhone

                On 05.09.2013, at 00:53, "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> wrote:

                > I'm no German scholar, but I doubt that. It's a brand new verb and wouldn't have those irregular vowel changes.
                > Ich disse, tu dissest, er disst, wir dissen, ihr disset, sie dissen
                >
                > I guess???
                >
                > Charlie
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > Ich deiß, du deißt, usw?
                >
                > "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 12.10:
                >
                >> dissen, dass, gedoten
                >>
                >> or maybe
                >>
                >> dissen, dußte, gedußt
                >>
                >> Charlie
                >> ----- Original Message -----
                >>
                >> One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused when
                >> I suggested the past tense of "diss" should be "dast".
                >>
                >> - Doc
                >>
                >>
                >>> -------- Original Message --------
                >>> From: "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...>
                >>> Date: Wed, September 04, 2013 12:41 pm
                >>>
                >>> Hi!
                >>>
                >>> While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary. The article gave the translation of “diss” into several languages.
                >>>
                >>> I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”, while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.
                >>>
                >>> I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation. I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work. El me dissó???
                >>>
                >>> But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
                >>>
                >>> Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for disrespect or disparage .
                >>>
                >>> Charlie
              • Anaïs Ahmed
                I was only joking, of course. :)
                Message 7 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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                  I was only joking, of course. :)



                  "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 17.53:

                  > I'm no German scholar, but I doubt that. It's a brand new verb and wouldn't have those irregular vowel changes.
                  > Ich disse, tu dissest, er disst, wir dissen, ihr disset, sie dissen
                  >
                  > I guess???
                  >
                  > Charlie
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > Ich deiß, du deißt, usw?
                  >
                  > "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 12.10:
                  >
                  >> dissen, dass, gedoten
                  >>
                  >> or maybe
                  >>
                  >> dissen, dußte, gedußt
                  >>
                  >> Charlie
                  >> ----- Original Message -----
                  >>
                  >> One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused when
                  >> I suggested the past tense of "diss" should be "dast".
                  >>
                  >> - Doc
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>> -------- Original Message --------
                  >>> From: "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...>
                  >>> Date: Wed, September 04, 2013 12:41 pm
                  >>>
                  >>> Hi!
                  >>>
                  >>> While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary. The article gave the translation of “diss” into several languages.
                  >>>
                  >>> I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”, while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.
                  >>>
                  >>> I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation. I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work. El me dissó???
                  >>>
                  >>> But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
                  >>>
                  >>> Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for disrespect or disparage .
                  >>>
                  >>> Charlie
                • Scott Villanueva-Hlad
                  I always hear disrespect used as a verb. He disrespected me. It feels like sandpaper on my eardrums. S ... From: Constructed Languages List
                  Message 8 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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                    I always hear "disrespect" used as a verb.
                    "He disrespected me." It feels like sandpaper on my eardrums.
                    S

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On Behalf Of Anaïs Ahmed
                    Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 5:32 PM
                    To: CONLANG@...
                    Subject: Re: To diss

                    I was only joking, of course. :)



                    "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 17.53:

                    > I'm no German scholar, but I doubt that. It's a brand new verb and wouldn't have those irregular vowel changes.
                    > Ich disse, tu dissest, er disst, wir dissen, ihr disset, sie dissen
                    >
                    > I guess???
                    >
                    > Charlie
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > Ich deiß, du deißt, usw?
                    >
                    > "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 12.10:
                    >
                    >> dissen, dass, gedoten
                    >>
                    >> or maybe
                    >>
                    >> dissen, dußte, gedußt
                    >>
                    >> Charlie
                    >> ----- Original Message -----
                    >>
                    >> One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused
                    >> when I suggested the past tense of "diss" should be "dast".
                    >>
                    >> - Doc
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>> -------- Original Message --------
                    >>> From: "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...>
                    >>> Date: Wed, September 04, 2013 12:41 pm
                    >>>
                    >>> Hi!
                    >>>
                    >>> While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary. The article gave the translation of “diss” into several languages.
                    >>>
                    >>> I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”, while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.
                    >>>
                    >>> I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation. I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work. El me dissó???
                    >>>
                    >>> But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
                    >>>
                    >>> Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for disrespect or disparage .
                    >>>
                    >>> Charlie
                  • Scott Villanueva-Hlad
                    PS... no one considered a weak verb: dissen, disste, gedisst... ... From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU] On Behalf Of Anaïs
                    Message 9 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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                      PS... no one considered a weak verb: dissen, disste, gedisst...

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On Behalf Of Anaïs Ahmed
                      Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 5:32 PM
                      To: CONLANG@...
                      Subject: Re: To diss

                      I was only joking, of course. :)



                      "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 17.53:

                      > I'm no German scholar, but I doubt that. It's a brand new verb and wouldn't have those irregular vowel changes.
                      > Ich disse, tu dissest, er disst, wir dissen, ihr disset, sie dissen
                      >
                      > I guess???
                      >
                      > Charlie
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > Ich deiß, du deißt, usw?
                      >
                      > "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 12.10:
                      >
                      >> dissen, dass, gedoten
                      >>
                      >> or maybe
                      >>
                      >> dissen, dußte, gedußt
                      >>
                      >> Charlie
                      >> ----- Original Message -----
                      >>
                      >> One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused
                      >> when I suggested the past tense of "diss" should be "dast".
                      >>
                      >> - Doc
                      >>
                      >>
                      >>> -------- Original Message --------
                      >>> From: "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...>
                      >>> Date: Wed, September 04, 2013 12:41 pm
                      >>>
                      >>> Hi!
                      >>>
                      >>> While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary. The article gave the translation of “diss” into several languages.
                      >>>
                      >>> I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”, while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.
                      >>>
                      >>> I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation. I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work. El me dissó???
                      >>>
                      >>> But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
                      >>>
                      >>> Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for disrespect or disparage .
                      >>>
                      >>> Charlie
                    • Cosman246
                      Weak verbs are less fun to come up with -Yash Tulsyan On Wed, Sep 4, 2013 at 5:21 PM, Scott Villanueva-Hlad
                      Message 10 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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                        Weak verbs are less fun to come up with


                        -Yash Tulsyan


                        On Wed, Sep 4, 2013 at 5:21 PM, Scott Villanueva-Hlad
                        <scotthlad@...>wrote:

                        > PS... no one considered a weak verb: dissen, disste, gedisst...
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On
                        > Behalf Of Anaïs Ahmed
                        > Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 5:32 PM
                        > To: CONLANG@...
                        > Subject: Re: To diss
                        >
                        > I was only joking, of course. :)
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello 17.53:
                        >
                        > > I'm no German scholar, but I doubt that. It's a brand new verb and
                        > wouldn't have those irregular vowel changes.
                        > > Ich disse, tu dissest, er disst, wir dissen, ihr disset, sie dissen
                        > >
                        > > I guess???
                        > >
                        > > Charlie
                        > >
                        > > ----- Original Message -----
                        > > Ich deiß, du deißt, usw?
                        > >
                        > > "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...> kirjoitti 4.9.2013 kello
                        > 12.10:
                        > >
                        > >> dissen, dass, gedoten
                        > >>
                        > >> or maybe
                        > >>
                        > >> dissen, dußte, gedußt
                        > >>
                        > >> Charlie
                        > >> ----- Original Message -----
                        > >>
                        > >> One of my profs (natural language processing class) was very amused
                        > >> when I suggested the past tense of "diss" should be "dast".
                        > >>
                        > >> - Doc
                        > >>
                        > >>
                        > >>> -------- Original Message --------
                        > >>> From: "C. Brickner" <tepeyachill@...>
                        > >>> Date: Wed, September 04, 2013 12:41 pm
                        > >>>
                        > >>> Hi!
                        > >>>
                        > >>> While reading this morning, I came across the word “diss”. I decided
                        > to check the etymology, so I consulted Wiktionary. The article gave the
                        > translation of “diss” into several languages.
                        > >>>
                        > >>> I find it interesting that Danish, Dutch, German, Icelandic, and
                        > Swedish (all Germanic languages) and Finnish have some form of “diss”,
                        > while the Romance languages listed, French, Italian, Portuguese, and
                        > Spanish use some form of “insult” or “defame”.
                        > >>>
                        > >>> I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation. I don’t
                        > think that “disser” and “dissare” would work. El me dissó???
                        > >>>
                        > >>> But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
                        > >>>
                        > >>> Etymology of dis(s)? Originated in Jamaican Vernacular English or
                        > African American Vernacular English , probably originally short for
                        > disrespect or disparage .
                        > >>>
                        > >>> Charlie
                        >
                      • C. Brickner
                        Me, too, but it s been in the AHD since 1969. Charlie ... I always hear disrespect used as a verb. He disrespected me. It feels like sandpaper on my
                        Message 11 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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                          Me, too, but it's been in the AHD since 1969.
                          Charlie

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          I always hear "disrespect" used as a verb.

                          "He disrespected me." It feels like sandpaper on my eardrums.
                          S
                        • C. Brickner
                          Yes, I did. It s in my original message. See below. Charlie ... PS... no one considered a weak verb: dissen, disste, gedisst...
                          Message 12 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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                            Yes, I did. It's in my original message. See below.
                            Charlie

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            PS... no one considered a weak verb: dissen, disste, gedisst...

                            >>> I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation. I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work. El me dissó???
                            >>>
                            >>> But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
                            >>>
                          • Garth Wallace
                            On Wed, Sep 4, 2013 at 5:20 PM, Scott Villanueva-Hlad ... Not sure why it would. Respect can be a verb, and dis- derives verbs all of the time.
                            Message 13 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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                              On Wed, Sep 4, 2013 at 5:20 PM, Scott Villanueva-Hlad
                              <scotthlad@...> wrote:
                              > I always hear "disrespect" used as a verb.
                              > "He disrespected me." It feels like sandpaper on my eardrums.

                              Not sure why it would. "Respect" can be a verb, and "dis-" derives
                              verbs all of the time.
                            • Scott Villanueva-Hlad
                              OOPS... mea culpa ... From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU] On Behalf Of C. Brickner Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 7:37 PM
                              Message 14 of 15 , Sep 4, 2013
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                                OOPS... mea culpa

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On Behalf Of C. Brickner
                                Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 7:37 PM
                                To: CONLANG@...
                                Subject: Re: To diss

                                Yes, I did. It's in my original message. See below.
                                Charlie

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                PS... no one considered a weak verb: dissen, disste, gedisst...

                                >>> I imagine the difference has something do with conjugation. I don’t think that “disser” and “dissare” would work. El me dissó???
                                >>>
                                >>> But I love “er hat mich gedisst”.
                                >>>
                              • Roger Mills
                                From: Scott Villanueva-Hlad I always hear disrespect used as a verb. He disrespected me. It feels like sandpaper on my eardrums. RM
                                Message 15 of 15 , Sep 5, 2013
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                                  From: Scott Villanueva-Hlad <scotthlad@...>



                                  I always hear "disrespect" used as a verb.
                                  "He disrespected me." It feels like sandpaper on my eardrums.

                                  RM Seems to me that I've tended to hear/use "disrespect" as the noun form-- "he showed disrespect toward his father = he didn't respect his father" whereas "he disrespected his father" implies (to me) something a little more active, maybe something verbal (like 'the old man's an #$%& SOB') and I think modern "diss" also implies something more than simple lack of respect.  Maybe ............?
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