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Re: Colloquial French resources

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  • Jonathan Beagley
    To get back on topic, however, you might want to look at French rap for some examples of colloquial / slang French. The subject matter is often quite
    Message 1 of 50 , Sep 1, 2013
      To get back on topic, however, you might want to look at French rap for
      some examples of colloquial / slang French. The subject matter is often
      quite uninteresting (unless you like reading about selling drugs,
      womanizing and fast cars) and offensive, but you will certainly get
      examples of slang. IRC (Internet Relay Chat) chatrooms are also a good
      place to get examples of "spoken French." I actually based a paper on
      future tense use in spoken French on an IRC-based corpus.

      Also, I assume you mean colloquial metropolitan French and not colloquial
      Québécois. The two are very different...


      2013/8/30 Aidan Grey <taalenmaple@...>

      > Rather than just another Future English, I'm working on a future French.
      > Wassa is a polysynthetic French that's lost its nasals and its
      > uvular/guttural R, and I'm still playing with the idea of tones, but not
      > sure it's going to happen just yet.
      >
      > To that end - are there any good resources out there on colloquial / slang
      > French? The French I know / read is very academic and literary, and I need
      > to learn more about the ways that it's already changing.
      >
      > I've done some looking, but haven't had very good luck so far.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Aidan
      >
    • Aidan Grey
      Ha! I am killing number distinctions. After all - homme and hommes are homophones. In addition, it s common in many polysynthetic langs, where number is only
      Message 50 of 50 , Sep 9, 2013
        Ha! I am killing number distinctions. After all - homme and hommes are
        homophones. In addition, it's common in many polysynthetic langs, where
        number is only visible on the verb.

        Killing gender in articles / determiners isn't difficult, since most of
        those vowels are unstressed.


        On Mon, Sep 9, 2013 at 8:12 AM, Basilius <vechernov@...> wrote:

        > On Wed, 4 Sep 2013 08:40:23 +0200, Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets wrote:
        >
        > >On 4 September 2013 04:47, Aidan Grey wrote:
        > >
        > >>
        > >> > I would agree with Christophe though that the most common solution is
        > to
        > >> > simply replace "le" or "la" with "ça".
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >> I am thinking to have la and sa as 3rd sg., but different cases, one
        > nom,
        > >> one acc/dat., or some combination thereof.
        > >>
        > >
        > >Could happen. I'm not sure about the distribution of _ça_ with an
        > expressed
        > >noun phrase, i.e. whether it's more common in subject or object position.
        > >My gut instinct says object position, but I could be wrong. Also, I'm not
        > >aware of _ça_ used in object position to refer to persons (if it happens,
        > >it's probably very markedly pejorative, even more than _ça_ as subject
        > with
        > >a person as referent).
        > >
        > >If you lose the gender distinctions otherwise, you might keep them in
        > >verbal agreement markings only, and actually introduce a
        > >masculine/feminine/neuter distinction there à la English he/she/it. It
        > >would probably (for the subject agreement prefixes anyway) sound like
        > >i/e/sa.
        >
        > For agreement marking on verbs, this would seem the most natural option to
        > me, too.
        >
        > However, were I designing a genderless Future French myself, I'd be mostly
        > bothered by elimination of gender agreement within NP's; and especially by
        > getting rid of purely lexical gender, i. e. gender in inanimates; and in
        > doing so, I'd probably get stuck at killing the gender distinctions in
        > articles and other determiners (_le_ vs. _la_; _du_ vs. _de la_; _au_ vs.
        > _à la_; _mon_ vs. _ma_; _ce_ vs. _cette_, etc.).
        >
        > In fact, it seems to me that killing them without simultaneously killing
        > the *number* distinctions would look rather forced and artificial.
        >
        > It could be different if what one is designing is actually a creole.
        >
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