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Re: Rolling your R's

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  • Elena ``of Valhalla''
    ... I believe (but I m not completely sure) that I used to pronounce an uvular trill (when relatively young), but now most of the time it is an uvular
    Message 1 of 40 , Jul 18, 2013
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      On 2013-07-18 at 12:30:43 +0200, BPJ wrote:
      > 2013-07-18 09:56, Elena ``of Valhalla'' skrev:
      > >I can't pronounce the alveolar trill, as well, and it is a sound
      > >in what is supposed to be my own accent of Italian.
      > So what *do* you pronounce? An uvular trill/fricative/approximant
      > or an alveolar fricative/approximant?

      I believe (but I'm not completely sure) that I used to pronounce
      an uvular trill (when relatively young), but now most of the time
      it is an uvular fricative.

      > >I believe this case is quite common: it has a popular name (erre moscia)
      > >and a page on the italian and spanish wikipedias:
      > >
      > >https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotacismo_(medicina)
      > >https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rotacismo
      >
      > I would have expected 'rotacismo' to denote a replacement of /z/
      > or /l/ with a rhotic -- that's what it usually means in
      > historical linguistics.

      me too: I searched for the popular name on the italian wikipedia
      and was redirected to that article.

      > It's a bit like having [ʃ] instead of [x]/[χ] in Gothenburg. You
      > are sure to get teased for it at school, at least if you're a
      > boy, but people grow up.

      And if you aren't teased for the way you pronounce something,
      you are going to be teased for something else, anyway :)

      --
      Elena ``of Valhalla''
    • Roger Mills
      Spanish, when sung, often gets distorted...:-)  To my ears, he s just doing the normal [D] (as in Engl. the, there) pronunciation of intervocalic /d/. The
      Message 40 of 40 , Jul 23, 2013
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        Spanish, when sung, often gets distorted...:-)  To my ears, he's just doing the normal [D] (as in Engl. the, there) pronunciation of intervocalic /d/. The fact that his mouth is wide open may have something to do with it.

        As you probably know, in colloquial ~fast speech, Span. intervoc. /d/ [D] is often dropped entirely-- aplastado = [aplas'ta.o]



        ________________________________
        From: Leonardo Castro <leolucas1980@...>
        To: CONLANG@...
        Sent: Tuesday, July 23, 2013 12:42 PM
        Subject: Re: Rolling your R's


        Is it just me, or they really pronounce the "d" of "aplastado",
        "espinado", etc. as laminar alveolar flaps in this song (Corazón
        Espinado)?

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hFO0Nrr5z-U

        Até mais!

        Leonardo
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