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Re: Forums for prehistoric linguistics of Europe?

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  • R A Brown
    On 05/07/2013 07:55, R A Brown wrote: [snip] ... OOPS!! a negative got omitted there :( I should have written: He s the guy who claims the script on the
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 5, 2013
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      On 05/07/2013 07:55, R A Brown wrote:
      [snip]
      >
      > He's the guy who claims the script on the Lemnos stele
      > is a western Greek alphabet of the 6th century BC,

      OOPS!! a negative got omitted there :(

      I should have written: "He's the guy who claims the script
      on the Lemnos stele is _not_ a western Greek alphabet of the
      6th century BC,

      > but a script derived from 'runic' script of the Turkic
      > Orhun and Yeniset inscriptions and other similar central
      > Asian inscriptions

      I suppose I ought to have added that "and only
      coincidentally gives the appearance of a Greek script!"

      --
      Ray
      ==================================
      http://www.carolandray.plus.com
      ==================================
      "language … began with half-musical unanalysed expressions
      for individual beings and events."
      [Otto Jespersen, Progress in Language, 1895]
    • Jörg Rhiemeier
      Hallo conlangers! ... And most of the others Padraic suggested are also unhelpful, for various reasons. Substratumlanguages would in theory be exactly the
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 5, 2013
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        Hallo conlangers!

        On Friday 05 July 2013 08:55:27 R A Brown wrote:

        > On 05/07/2013 00:49, Padraic Brown wrote:
        > [snip]
        >
        > > Interesting, but quite possibly crackpotty:
        > >
        > > http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/Polat_Kaya/
        >
        > Polat Kaya, eh? Definitely crackpotty then.

        And most of the others Padraic suggested are also unhelpful,
        for various reasons. Substratumlanguages would in theory be
        exactly the right thing (and I *am* there), but in practice,
        nobody posts there (and probably, nobody reads it). Cybalist
        is dedicated to IE studies, but it is de facto a Paleolithic
        Continuity mailing list, which is the reason why I have left it.
        The others are either not at all about European linguistic
        prehistory, or crackpotty, or both.

        I have been watching the Aegeanet archive lately, but apart
        from the list being limited to one particular region (and not
        even the ones where my interest is strongest, viz. Central
        Europe and the British Isles), it mostly carries announcements
        of conferences and similar stuff.

        > He's the guy who claims the script on the Lemnos stele is
        > a western Greek alphabet of the 6th century BC, but a script
        > derived from 'runic' script of the Turkic Orhun and Yeniset
        > inscriptions and other similar central Asian inscriptions.
        > The language, of course, is not an Etruscan related one, as
        > most think, but Turkic!
        > http://www.carolandray.plus.com/Eteocretan/LemnianTrans.html#Kaya

        Funny.

        > > Bet you didn't know that the ancient city of Troy is
        > > actually the "Home of the Turks"! ;)))
        >
        > ... of course, and the Pelasgians were Turks. :-D

        Turkish nationalism gone loopy.

        --
        ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
        http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
        "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
      • Padraic Brown
        ... Terribly sorry to hear that! The ones I picked were the *least* loopy ones I could find! All the rest were either neo-paganette reconstructionists,
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 5, 2013
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          > From: Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...>

          >
          > And most of the others Padraic suggested are also unhelpful,
          > for various reasons. 

          Terribly sorry to hear that! The ones I picked were the *least* loopy ones
          I could find! All the rest were either neo-paganette reconstructionists,
          satanists, neo-nazis or various west Asian cultural groups (Pashto, Iranian,
          Afghan, etc).

          Hopefully someone can point you in a better direction!

          >> > Bet you didn't know that the ancient city of Troy is
          >> > actually the "Home of the Turks"! ;)))
          >>
          >> ... of course, and the Pelasgians were Turks. :-D
          >
          > Turkish nationalism gone loopy.

          Oh, the hilarity!

          Padraic
        • Padraic Brown
          Voiceless dentals go yer ways,     see yez in some oblique case! Ablaut and Umlaut came to play,      a ə, e ae, u o naught! Mentolatian likes
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 17, 2013
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            Voiceless dentals go yer ways,
                see yez in some oblique case!

            Ablaut and Umlaut came to play,
                 a > ə, e > ae, u > o > naught!
            Mentolatian likes to take the nom. pl. of a noun and use that as a root
            for a semantically extended series of nouns. For example, we have the
            word dazg (house, roof, covering) whose plural is jí (from old dəzgí).
            This plural becomes a new root, j- and can form a new word with a
            common nominal stem, -un. Hence, jun, cloth. The plural of cloth, jní,
            plus a different nominal stem, -aru, gives us sinaru, clothing. The plural
            of clothing, snáer, yields a common word for a suit or wardrobe of
            clothing, sneres. Finally, the plural of suits, zrəzí, plus a curious little
            combining root, -sd (place where), gives us erzed, an armoir or dresser.

            So, where the heck did dazg- go off to???

            Padraic
          • Virginia Keys
            ... Voiceless dentals go yer ways,     see yez in some oblique case! Ablaut and Umlaut came to play,      a ə, e ae, u o naught! Mentolatian
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 20, 2013
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              On Wed, 17 Jul 2013 20:11:10 -0700, Padraic Brown <elemtilas@...> wrote:

              >

              Voiceless dentals go yer ways,
                  see yez in some oblique case!

              Ablaut and Umlaut came to play,
                   a > ə, e > ae, u > o > naught!
              Mentolatian likes to take the nom. pl. of a noun and use that as a root
              for a semantically extended series of nouns. For example, we have the
              word dazg (house, roof, covering) whose plural is jí (from old dəzgí).
              This plural becomes a new root, j- and can form a new word with a
              common nominal stem, -un. Hence, jun, cloth. The plural of cloth, jní,
              plus a different nominal stem, -aru, gives us sinaru, clothing. The plural
              of clothing, snáer, yields a common word for a suit or wardrobe of
              clothing, sneres. Finally, the plural of suits, zrəzí, plus a curious little
              combining root, -sd (place where), gives us erzed, an armoir or dresser.

              So, where the heck did dazg- go off to???

              Padraic


              Haha, nice! I find your post particularly interesting, as I had been trying to think of ways to grow families of words from roots. Food for thought!

              --Virginia
            • Padraic Brown
              ... For some odd reason, it just made sense for the language to go this route. Some transformations are pretty obvious: enem (pl. nmí), spirit yields manzed,
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 21, 2013
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                > From: Virginia Keys <virginiakeys@...>

                >
                > Mentolatian likes to take the nom. pl. of a noun and use that as a root
                > for a semantically extended series of nouns. For example, we have the
                > word dazg (house, roof, covering) whose plural is jí (from old dəzgí).
                > This plural becomes a new root, j- and can form a new word with a
                > common nominal stem, -un. Hence, jun, cloth. The plural of cloth, jní,
                > plus a different nominal stem, -aru, gives us sinaru, clothing. The plural
                > of clothing, snáer, yields a common word for a suit or wardrobe of
                > clothing, sneres. Finally, the plural of suits, zrəzí, plus a curious little
                > combining root, -sd (place where), gives us erzed, an armoir or dresser.
                >
                > Haha, nice! I find your post particularly interesting, as I had been trying to
                > think of ways to grow families of words from roots. Food for thought!

                For some odd reason, it just made sense for the language to go this route.
                Some transformations are pretty obvious: enem (pl. nmí), spirit yields
                manzed, chapel or temple. Some are not so: cwanu (pl. nwí), noblewoman
                yields wanzed, inner court or newaru, debt servant. On the other hand,
                another word for woman, mannu (pl. mní), yields nemaru, midwife. Other
                transformational morphemes could extend these: nemaruta, health or
                nemaruwan, to heal; newaruta, servitude.

                Some of these require an understanding of the culture before they become
                clear. The inner court of a Mentolatian greathouse is roughly what we might
                consider a formal garden with the addition of ancillary rooms on either side:
                library / reading room, a room for refreshment, etc. These are the women's
                rooms and this is where Things Get Done --- quite literally the "seat of
                power".

                On the other hand, and I suppose in a curiously odd twist of fate, if
                a family finds itself in debt, it has been traditional to sell the eldest daughter
                into servitude for a prescribed length of time until the debt is considered paid.
                This actually nearly brought about the destruction of the whole culture. Twas
                nearly two centuries ago that  Mentolatum found itself in a scuffle with Auntimoany.
                Scuffle ended, in typicaly Germanic fashion, the victorious Emperor at the time
                sought to "seal the deal" with a royal marriage and quite naturally demanded
                the daughter of the arquan in marriage. Consternation ensued -- after all, how
                could the arquan condescend to sell off his daughter into slavery!? -- but there
                being no real choice in the matter, the poor girl got sent away. Although she
                apparently succumbed to some wasting illness within two years, every Mentolatian
                knew it was really an act of honorable suicide. Anyway, Auntimoany went on its
                merry way, while Mentolatum fell into a nasty civil war and economic depression.
                The arquan was deposed and much that was fair in the country fell to ruin. Twas
                only about fifty years ago that the arquanate was restored, but its reputation was
                still very much tarnished. Much of the old esteem was refurbished five years ago
                when the present arquan, on the anniversary of that ill-fated wedding, decreed
                an end to the practice of newaruta.

                Padraic

                > --Virginia
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