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Re: Conlang punctuation.

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  • Padraic Brown
    ... I never really noticed this before, but I do think you are on to something. I will have to look at some Real French Books some time to compare with the
    Message 1 of 35 , Jul 1 3:37 PM
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      > From: Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets <tsela.cg@...>

      >
      >Nice that it mentioned non-breaking spaces *before* two-part punctuation in
      >French :) . I've always felt the absence of space in English made signs
      >like ! and ? too close to the preceding word for comfort.


      I never really noticed this before, but I do think you are on to something. I will
      have to look at some Real French Books some time to compare with the usual
      English practice.


      > Note however that
      >in good French typography the size of the space *before* the punctuation is
      >not the same as the size of the space *after* it. The space after
      >punctuation is a normal space (similar to the one between words), while the
      >space before punctuation should be a thin space, about a fifth to a sixth
      >of an em-width. Unfortunately, web typography usually doesn't allow an easy
      >way to type in non-breaking thin spaces...


      That makes sense. I've found that, at least in Word Perfect, one can easily do

      some manual kerning. Either 1/12 or 1/6 em is about right, though. Then it's

      just a matter of globally replacing the nonspace before ! and ? by the kerning
      code.

      It's pretty general hereabouts to place a double space after a sentence final
      punctuation mark (though in less formal contexts, this practice tends to be
      entirely disregarded).


      >Another peculiar punctuation is that of Modern Greek, which uses the
      >semi-colon as a question mark, while the role of the semi-colon is taken
      >over by the raised dot. In principle, the role of the colon should also be
      >taken by the raised dot, but in practice most Greek speakers now simply use
      >the colon.
      >
      >My own Moten doesn't really have an orthography, just a romanisation, so I
      >just use the punctuation standard of the language I'm writing in, usually
      >English. On the other hand I have a language for which I created a peculiar
      >punctuation on purpose: my Chasmäöcho is written using Latin letters and
      >existing punctuation, but it uses it all differently, just for the sake of
      >being different (I was in a bit of a contrary mood at that time :P).


      Only at that time!? ;))))


      > The
      >Listserv archives have quite a lot of material on Chasmäöcho (not all easy
      >to find), but the relevant post can be found here:
      >http://listserv.brown.edu/archives/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0006A&L=CONLANG&P=R6166&I=-3&d=No+Match%3BMatch%3BMatches

      You wòuld have to throw in one normal set of punctuation marks, just to confuse matters: "_and the quotes "" are used for
      quoting_" :)

      Padraic


      >--
      >Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.
      >
      >http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
      >http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
      >
      >
    • Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews
      Thanks for the link. Mellissa Green @GreenNovelist ... From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU] On Behalf Of Garth Wallace Sent:
      Message 35 of 35 , Jul 3 9:42 AM
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        Thanks for the link.

        Mellissa Green


        @GreenNovelist


        -----Original Message-----
        From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On
        Behalf Of Garth Wallace
        Sent: Wednesday, July 3, 2013 12:41 PM
        To: CONLANG@...
        Subject: Re: Conlang punctuation.

        On Wed, Jul 3, 2013 at 9:13 AM, Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews
        <goldyemoran@...> wrote:
        > Thanks for the description.
        >
        > What's a double dagger?
        > And what's it used for? How about a single dagger? Are they slash marks?

        A dagger is a cross shape, like a plus sign but with crossbar closer
        to the top, and usually a superscript. Some fancier typefaces make it
        look more like a stylized knife pointing down. A double dagger is
        similar, except there are two crossbars: one closer to the top and one
        closer to the bottom. They're used to mark footnotes, like an
        asterisk, usually if there are multiple footnotes on the same page.
        For example, the first footnote on the page may use and asterisk, the
        second a double asterisk (two asterisks in a row), the third a dagger,
        and the fourth a double dagger. Some texts use superscript digits for
        multiple footnotes, but texts that have both footnotes and endnotes
        will usually use the superscript digits for endnotes and asterisks and
        daggers for footnotes.

        Daggers are also sometimes used to mark death dates, and for a few
        other things besides. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dagger_(typography)
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