Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Language Modes, Was: Phonetic Transcription

Expand Messages
  • Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews
    Olfactory mode might be interesting to imploy. I remember trying to match mood with skin color changes, but that didn t work, so aybe emotions can be scented.
    Message 1 of 42 , May 3, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Olfactory mode might be interesting to imploy. I remember trying to match
      mood with skin color changes, but that didn't work, so aybe emotions can be
      scented.

      Mellissa Green


      @GreenNovelist

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On
      Behalf Of Jörg Rhiemeier
      Sent: Friday, May 3, 2013 1:47 PM
      To: CONLANG@...
      Subject: Re: Phonetic Transcription

      Hallo conlangers!

      On Friday 03 May 2013 22:33:58 And Rosta wrote:

      > Jörg Rhiemeier, On 03/05/2013 15:33:
      > > Yet, I think that auditory languages are more likely than visual
      > > (require line of sight and a light source), tactile (obviously
      > > work only at very short range) or olfactory ones (probably doesn't
      > > work for languages with grammar because the scents mix and you
      > > never know whether they arrive in correct order). But the kinds
      > > of sounds they use can be vastly different from ours!
      >
      > Would you class languages based on the medium of radio waves together with
      > auditory languages, on the grounds that they're one-dimensional, don't
      > require line of sight and light source, do work at long range, and so
      > forth?

      They are another modality entirely, and may exist in alien beings,
      especially in ones that have evolved further by means of technology.
      Radio is quite like auditory, indeed even better (which is the reason
      why people use it - its only drawback is that we need gadgets to use
      it).

      --
      ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
      http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
      "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
    • Logan Kearsley
      ... Perhaps they come from a planet in a binary (or formerly binary) system around a pulsar, which puts out quite a but of radio energy. That would pretty
      Message 42 of 42 , May 4, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        On 4 May 2013 14:28, Dan Henry <rdanhenry@...> wrote:
        > The difficulty for bioradio communication is that communicative abilities
        > evolve to use existing sensory capabilities. Radio senses will only evolve
        > in an environment in which practically useful radio data exists fairly
        > consistently over long periods of time. It may well be that an environment
        > that would favor such senses would produce life too alien for us to
        > understand their psychology in any depth, much less imagine it from our
        > armchairs. Or not. It depends on how universal our own notions of
        > intelligence prove to be. One has a great deal of freedom in speculating on
        > alien biology/psychology, as we are extrapolating from a single reference
        > point of terrestrial evolution.

        Perhaps they come from a planet in a binary (or formerly binary)
        system around a pulsar, which puts out quite a but of radio energy.
        That would pretty alien. Or maybe there're just a lot of large storms,
        and being able to sense lightning flashes from far away is useful.

        I think we can get a bit more prosaic than that, though. Earthly
        lifeforms can produce pretty strong electrical charges, and can detect
        very faint electrical charges incidentally produced by the activity of
        other animal's nervous systems, but our nerves somewhat oddly don't
        actually work on electrical conduction. It's not too difficult to
        imagine alien life that *does* have electrically conductive nerves
        (electrically conductive biomolecules are not particularly hard to
        come by), in which case the starting and stopping of current in their
        nervous systems would produce faint incidental radio emissions which
        other animals could sense for hunting purposes.

        > If you wanted to actually work out such a system of natural radio language,
        > you'd do best to start by figuring out what the radio sense was originally
        > evolved for. Communication would probably use frequencies near those of the
        > sources of interest, but not the same frequencies, so that communications
        > and navigational (or whatever) radio did not interfere.

        I'm not sold on that. Human sonic language isn't distinguished from
        other natural sounds by being in an offset frequency range, but by
        having different frequency mixture characteristics.

        -l.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.