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Re: Conlangs and English Language History

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  • Herman Miller
    ... Sounds like anusvara in Indic languages, which can be represented as m with a dot under it (ṃ). If you re using , you might as well also use
    Message 1 of 35 , Apr 30, 2013
      On 4/30/2013 12:38 PM, Leonardo Castro wrote:
      > 2013/4/30 BPJ<bpj@...>:
      >> 2013-04-30 13:49, Leonardo Castro skrev:
      >>
      >>> BTW, does anyone have a system that distinguishes /n/, /m/, /N/ and a
      >>> general nasal stop /~/ with Roman characters?
      >>
      >>
      >> You mean nasalization like in French or Portuguese I suppose,
      >> coz that's what /~/ is.
      >
      > I meant a nasal stop that has the same place of articulation as the
      > following consonant. That is, it "absorbs" the place of articulation
      > of the following consonant.

      Sounds like anusvara in Indic languages, which can be represented as m
      with a dot under it (ṃ). If you're using <ṃ>, you might as well also use
      <ṅ> (n with dot above) for /ŋ/.

      In Yasaro romanization I use <ñ> for homorganic nasals and <ŋ> (eng) for
      /ŋ/.
    • Leonardo Castro
      ... Nice! I have already considered or for /ŋ/ and or for homorganic nasals. I think your choices are probably the best looking; teñki
      Message 35 of 35 , May 9, 2013
        2013/4/30 Herman Miller <hmiller@...>:
        > On 4/30/2013 12:38 PM, Leonardo Castro wrote:
        >>
        >> 2013/4/30 BPJ<bpj@...>:
        >>>
        >>> 2013-04-30 13:49, Leonardo Castro skrev:
        >>>
        >>>> BTW, does anyone have a system that distinguishes /n/, /m/, /N/ and a
        >>>> general nasal stop /~/ with Roman characters?
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> You mean nasalization like in French or Portuguese I suppose,
        >>> coz that's what /~/ is.
        >>
        >>
        >> I meant a nasal stop that has the same place of articulation as the
        >> following consonant. That is, it "absorbs" the place of articulation
        >> of the following consonant.
        >
        >
        > Sounds like anusvara in Indic languages, which can be represented as m with
        > a dot under it (ṃ). If you're using <ṃ>, you might as well also use <ṅ> (n
        > with dot above) for /ŋ/.
        >
        > In Yasaro romanization I use <ñ> for homorganic nasals and <ŋ> (eng) for
        > /ŋ/.

        Nice! I have already considered <ñ> or <ŋ> for /ŋ/ and <ñ> or <~> for
        homorganic nasals. I think your choices are probably the best looking;
        "teñki" looks a lot better than "te~ki". There's also the option of
        letting <n> always stand for homorganic nasals before consonants and
        for /n/ before vowels, if you conlang doesn't have minimal pairs that
        cause ambiguity in this system.

        Até mais!

        Leonardo
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