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Re: Conlangs and English Language History

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  • Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews
    I d thought about creating another system, but not sure how I could represent it on the computer or in Braille for that matter. They do use leather scrolls
    Message 1 of 35 , Apr 28, 2013
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      I'd thought about creating another system, but not sure how I could
      represent it on the computer or in Braille for that matter. They do use
      leather scrolls called Prailea, which is similar to Braille in that it's
      raised. However, everyone uses it, unless they're men, who can't read nor
      write, and those with reading disabilities.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On
      Behalf Of Padraic Brown
      Sent: Saturday, April 27, 2013 8:09 PM
      To: CONLANG@...
      Subject: Re: Conlangs and English Language History

      --- On Sat, 4/27/13, Nicole Valicia Thompson-Andrews <goldyemoran@...>
      wrote:

      > Also, can accent marks be used as letters, such the Star?

      Sure, why not? They could possibly develop into letters. Much will
      depend on the conlang in question and its writing system.

      The 'rough breathing mark' becomes a letter (for the /h/ sound) in
      Loucarian, for example.

      People often use the apostrophe to represent the letter for the glottal
      stop.

      The only question becomes: why would you use the star or the dollar sign
      or whatever for letters in one of your (presumably Yemoran?) conlangs?
      You'd probably want to come up with a Yemoran system of writing, rather
      than use the English one...

      Padraic
    • Leonardo Castro
      ... Nice! I have already considered or for /ŋ/ and or for homorganic nasals. I think your choices are probably the best looking; teñki
      Message 35 of 35 , May 9 3:48 PM
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        2013/4/30 Herman Miller <hmiller@...>:
        > On 4/30/2013 12:38 PM, Leonardo Castro wrote:
        >>
        >> 2013/4/30 BPJ<bpj@...>:
        >>>
        >>> 2013-04-30 13:49, Leonardo Castro skrev:
        >>>
        >>>> BTW, does anyone have a system that distinguishes /n/, /m/, /N/ and a
        >>>> general nasal stop /~/ with Roman characters?
        >>>
        >>>
        >>>
        >>> You mean nasalization like in French or Portuguese I suppose,
        >>> coz that's what /~/ is.
        >>
        >>
        >> I meant a nasal stop that has the same place of articulation as the
        >> following consonant. That is, it "absorbs" the place of articulation
        >> of the following consonant.
        >
        >
        > Sounds like anusvara in Indic languages, which can be represented as m with
        > a dot under it (ṃ). If you're using <ṃ>, you might as well also use <ṅ> (n
        > with dot above) for /ŋ/.
        >
        > In Yasaro romanization I use <ñ> for homorganic nasals and <ŋ> (eng) for
        > /ŋ/.

        Nice! I have already considered <ñ> or <ŋ> for /ŋ/ and <ñ> or <~> for
        homorganic nasals. I think your choices are probably the best looking;
        "teñki" looks a lot better than "te~ki". There's also the option of
        letting <n> always stand for homorganic nasals before consonants and
        for /n/ before vowels, if you conlang doesn't have minimal pairs that
        cause ambiguity in this system.

        Até mais!

        Leonardo
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