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Re: Vowel Types

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  • Leonardo Castro
    ... I have seen some dictionaries describing it as a monosyllable, but the one below shows an optional schwa, what is more coherent to what I perceive,
    Message 1 of 54 , Apr 8, 2013
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      2013/4/8 David McCann <david@...>:
      > On Sun, 7 Apr 2013 19:23:12 -0300
      > Leonardo Castro <leolucas1980@...> wrote:
      >
      >> It's interesting that dictionaries list words like "fire" and "little"
      >> as monosyllables but they sound as disyllables to me, especially
      >> clearly in songs. Note that Michael Bublé rhymes "fire" /fai.@/ and
      >> "higher" /hai.@/:
      >
      > Singers can get up to anything! It's definitely [faiə] and [hai-ə];
      > [haiə] is "hire". And "little" does have two syllables [li-tl].

      I have seen some dictionaries describing it as a monosyllable, but the
      one below shows an optional schwa, what is more coherent to what I
      perceive, [lI.t@5]:
      http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/little?q=little

      >
      >> IIRC, there was a Backstreet Boys song that rhymed "desire" with
      >> "fire" as well...
      > As one should: [di-zaiə], [faiə].

      But, just like Michael Bublé, they pronounce the [ai] separated from
      the [@], with two well-marked different musical notes for each part:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fndeDfaWCg

      It's just in the beggining: "You are my fiiii.re, the one
      de.siiiii.re..." I hope that putting a link to the Backstreet Boys
      doesn't raise doubts about my masculinity. :-)
    • Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
      ... Yep, I m aware of this phenomenon. There is even something I would call the complaining schwa , which consists in adding a very elongated schwa at the end
      Message 54 of 54 , Apr 10, 2013
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        On 10 April 2013 13:28, Leonardo Castro <leolucas1980@...> wrote:

        > [...]
        > > However, whether this analysis is valid for the sometimes appearing final
        > > schwa of those French words like _propre_ is not something I'm ready to
        > > decide on yet.
        >
        > A non-native French teacher of mine sometimes put a schwa even in the
        > end of words that didn't have the final <e>: "jour"-> /juR@/.
        >

        Yep, I'm aware of this phenomenon. There is even something I would call the
        "complaining schwa", which consists in adding a very elongated schwa at the
        end of a sentence to signify "disagreement" (well, more like spoiled child
        behaviour that is :P). Mostly used by children, a typical example would be
        a spoiled brat complaining that he's hungry. Rather than simply shout _j'ai
        faim !_ [ʒɛˈfɛ̃], he will probably say something like _j'ai faim
        eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!_ [ʒɛˈfɛ̃.əːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːːː], with the
        stressed syllable being very strongly stressed :P .

        Schwas tend to crop up in Spoken French in places where you don't expect
        them. Hence my difficulty to treat them as underlying sounds that just wait
        for the right environment to show up. I expect they mostly come out due to
        euphony, to break difficult clusters, and sometimes to express discontent
        :P .
        --
        Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

        http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
        http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
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