Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: CHAT: Does etymology awareness affect your speech?

Expand Messages
  • George Marques de Jesus
    I m not sure about speech , but about writing I usually stop many times to check the dictionary and make sure that the word mean what I think it means.
    Message 1 of 46 , Mar 19, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm not sure about "speech", but about writing I usually stop many times to
      check the dictionary and make sure that the word mean what I think it means.

      Knowing the origin of word is good to know the meaning of it and how and
      when to use it, however we have to understand that language changes (and
      what changes it are the people who speak it).


      2013/3/18 Roger Mills <romiltz@...>

      > Someone should go back to grade school ........
      >
      > --- On Mon, 3/18/13, Sam Stutter <samjjs89@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: Sam Stutter <samjjs89@...>
      > Subject: Re: CHAT: Does etymology awareness affect your speech?
      > To: CONLANG@...
      > Date: Monday, March 18, 2013, 8:09 PM
      >
      > What's your opinion on the expression "could you borrow me a pencil"?
      >
      > On 18 Mar 2013, at 22:52, Matthew George <matt.msg@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I've begun to take care to keep certain kinds of multiple meanings
      > > separate, and to eliminate them in some cases. I now dislike the use of
      > > 'look' to refer to appearance or semblance as opposed to active sight,
      > for
      > > example. Sure, it results in fewer synonyms, but English is particularly
      > > rich in them - possibly one of the few special features I value in it now
      > > that I know more about the possibilities available.
      > >
      > > Matt G.
      >



      --
      ::. George Marques .::
    • George Corley
      ... Alright. I will say that borrow for loan is not something that I immediately recognize, and even have the same intuition as you (that the interlocutor
      Message 46 of 46 , Mar 23, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        On Sat, Mar 23, 2013 at 9:10 AM, Matthew George <matt.msg@...> wrote:

        > On Fri, Mar 22, 2013 at 11:35 PM, George Corley <gacorley@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        > > What exactly are you talking about?
        >
        >
        > The introduction of 'borrow' as a synonym for 'loan'. It's a very
        > different case from the use of 'learn' as you describe.
        >
        > I have no prescriptivist impulses regarding 'learn' - it's the borrow-loan
        > shift that I'm rejecting.
        >

        Alright. I will say that "borrow" for "loan" is not something that I
        immediately recognize, and even have the same intuition as you (that the
        interlocutor is being asked to borrow something on behalf of the speaker).
        Still, it exists and should be accounted for, regardless of whether either
        of us accept it intuitively, and we can easily do by comparing it to a
        pattern that exists cross-linguistically.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.