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Re: OT: Texas German dying out

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  • Anaïs Ahmed
    As I was passing through Ellinger, TX, I heard some people at a kolache store talking English in thick Czech accents. This was not more than a year ago. It s
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 11, 2013
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      As I was passing through Ellinger, TX, I heard some people at a kolache
      store talking English in thick Czech accents. This was not more than a year
      ago. It's still there.


      2013/3/11 Adam Walker <carraxan@...>

      > The same is true for the Czech spoken in Ennis, a town near me. Twenty
      > or thirty years ago it was still common to hear older people
      > conversing in Czech. Now its almost totally gone.
      >
      > Adam
      >
      > On 3/11/13, Gary Shannon <fiziwig@...> wrote:
      > > [QUOTE]
      > >
      > > When Kaye Langehennig
      > > Wong<
      > http://www.mysanantonio.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=news%2Flocal_news&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Kaye+Langehennig+Wong%22
      > >
      > > was
      > > a little girl in Katy in the '60s, her parents would take her to visit
      > her
      > > grandparents in Fredericksburg. “My grandparents lived in a stone house
      > on
      > > Main Street,” she says. “I played with horny toads and walked down Main
      > > Street listening to the ladies in the shops talking in German.”
      > >
      > > Wong's father spoke only German until he went to school. “My parents
      > spoke
      > > German to each other when they didn't want us to know what they were
      > > saying,” she says. But like many parents of their generation, they didn't
      > > teach her.
      > >
      > > The German Wong heard on Main Street was unlike German spoken anywhere
      > else
      > > in the world. Texas German, the result of the flood of German immigrants
      > > into South Central Texas in the 19th century, is an amalgam of many of
      > the
      > > dialects spoken in what is now Germany but was, until 1871, a collection
      > of
      > > independent states.
      > >
      > > [END QUOTE]
      > >
      > > Much more at the link.
      > >
      > > Read more:
      > >
      > http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local_news/article/Texas-German-dying-out-4343915.php#ixzz2NGn7j7ar
      > >
      > > --gary
      > >
      >
    • Adam Walker
      At least it is holding on somewhere. In Ennis it is pretty much dead and gone. Adam
      Message 2 of 7 , Mar 11, 2013
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        At least it is holding on somewhere. In Ennis it is pretty much dead and gone.

        Adam

        On 3/11/13, Anaïs Ahmed <aeetlrcreejl@...> wrote:
        > As I was passing through Ellinger, TX, I heard some people at a kolache
        > store talking English in thick Czech accents. This was not more than a year
        > ago. It's still there.
        >
        >
        > 2013/3/11 Adam Walker <carraxan@...>
        >
        >> The same is true for the Czech spoken in Ennis, a town near me. Twenty
        >> or thirty years ago it was still common to hear older people
        >> conversing in Czech. Now its almost totally gone.
        >>
        >> Adam
        >>
        >> On 3/11/13, Gary Shannon <fiziwig@...> wrote:
        >> > [QUOTE]
        >> >
        >> > When Kaye Langehennig
        >> > Wong<
        >> http://www.mysanantonio.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=news%2Flocal_news&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Kaye+Langehennig+Wong%22
        >> >
        >> > was
        >> > a little girl in Katy in the '60s, her parents would take her to visit
        >> her
        >> > grandparents in Fredericksburg. “My grandparents lived in a stone house
        >> on
        >> > Main Street,” she says. “I played with horny toads and walked down Main
        >> > Street listening to the ladies in the shops talking in German.”
        >> >
        >> > Wong's father spoke only German until he went to school. “My parents
        >> spoke
        >> > German to each other when they didn't want us to know what they were
        >> > saying,” she says. But like many parents of their generation, they
        >> > didn't
        >> > teach her.
        >> >
        >> > The German Wong heard on Main Street was unlike German spoken anywhere
        >> else
        >> > in the world. Texas German, the result of the flood of German
        >> > immigrants
        >> > into South Central Texas in the 19th century, is an amalgam of many of
        >> the
        >> > dialects spoken in what is now Germany but was, until 1871, a
        >> > collection
        >> of
        >> > independent states.
        >> >
        >> > [END QUOTE]
        >> >
        >> > Much more at the link.
        >> >
        >> > Read more:
        >> >
        >> http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local_news/article/Texas-German-dying-out-4343915.php#ixzz2NGn7j7ar
        >> >
        >> > --gary
        >> >
        >>
        >
      • BPJ
        It may be that the accent is lingering while the grammar and vocabulary are gone. It s not quite as likely when two different languages are involved but quite
        Message 3 of 7 , Mar 13, 2013
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          It may be that the accent is lingering while the grammar and
          vocabulary are gone. It's not quite as likely when two different
          languages are involved but quite common when local dialects
          give way to a prestige/'standard' variety of the same language.
          There is a stereotype heard here in Scandinavia thot people
          in Minnesota and Wisconsin still speak English with a noticeable
          Swedish/Norwegian accent. Don't know how accurate it is.

          /bpj

          On 2013-03-12 01:21, Adam Walker wrote:
          > At least it is holding on somewhere. In Ennis it is pretty much dead and gone.
          >
          > Adam
          >
          > On 3/11/13, Anaïs Ahmed <aeetlrcreejl@...> wrote:
          >> As I was passing through Ellinger, TX, I heard some people at a kolache
          >> store talking English in thick Czech accents. This was not more than a year
          >> ago. It's still there.
          >>
          >>
          >> 2013/3/11 Adam Walker <carraxan@...>
          >>
          >>> The same is true for the Czech spoken in Ennis, a town near me. Twenty
          >>> or thirty years ago it was still common to hear older people
          >>> conversing in Czech. Now its almost totally gone.
          >>>
          >>> Adam
          >>>
          >>> On 3/11/13, Gary Shannon <fiziwig@...> wrote:
          >>>> [QUOTE]
          >>>>
          >>>> When Kaye Langehennig
          >>>> Wong<
          >>> http://www.mysanantonio.com/?controllerName=search&action=search&channel=news%2Flocal_news&search=1&inlineLink=1&query=%22Kaye+Langehennig+Wong%22
          >>>>
          >>>> was
          >>>> a little girl in Katy in the '60s, her parents would take her to visit
          >>> her
          >>>> grandparents in Fredericksburg. “My grandparents lived in a stone house
          >>> on
          >>>> Main Street,” she says. “I played with horny toads and walked down Main
          >>>> Street listening to the ladies in the shops talking in German.”
          >>>>
          >>>> Wong's father spoke only German until he went to school. “My parents
          >>> spoke
          >>>> German to each other when they didn't want us to know what they were
          >>>> saying,” she says. But like many parents of their generation, they
          >>>> didn't
          >>>> teach her.
          >>>>
          >>>> The German Wong heard on Main Street was unlike German spoken anywhere
          >>> else
          >>>> in the world. Texas German, the result of the flood of German
          >>>> immigrants
          >>>> into South Central Texas in the 19th century, is an amalgam of many of
          >>> the
          >>>> dialects spoken in what is now Germany but was, until 1871, a
          >>>> collection
          >>> of
          >>>> independent states.
          >>>>
          >>>> [END QUOTE]
          >>>>
          >>>> Much more at the link.
          >>>>
          >>>> Read more:
          >>>>
          >>> http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local_news/article/Texas-German-dying-out-4343915.php#ixzz2NGn7j7ar
          >>>>
          >>>> --gary
          >>>>
          >>>
          >>
          >
        • Paul Schleitwiler, FCM
          Old Wisconsin joke: Ay ban gettin tired from Yewnited Stayuts. Ay tink ay go back tew Minny-SOtah. Told by Germans, of course. I think that television, with
          Message 4 of 7 , Mar 13, 2013
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            Old Wisconsin joke: "Ay ban gettin tired from Yewnited Stayuts. Ay tink ay
            go back tew Minny-SOtah."
            Told by Germans, of course.

            I think that television, with national broadcasters, killed local dialects.
            Que Dios te bendiga de siempre y de todas maneras,
            Paul

            On Wed, Mar 13, 2013 at 6:13 AM, BPJ <bpj@...> wrote:

            > It may be that the accent is lingering while the grammar and vocabulary
            > are gone. It's not quite as likely when two different
            > languages are involved but quite common when local dialects
            > give way to a prestige/'standard' variety of the same language.
            > There is a stereotype heard here in Scandinavia thot people
            > in Minnesota and Wisconsin still speak English with a noticeable
            > Swedish/Norwegian accent. Don't know how accurate it is.
            >
            > /bpj
            >
          • Krista D. Casada
            I have a friend from New Jersey whose family lect retains some interesting Norwegian vocabulary; is that close enough?? Krista C.
            Message 5 of 7 , Mar 14, 2013
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              I have a friend from New Jersey whose family lect retains some interesting Norwegian vocabulary; is that close enough??

              Krista C.
              ________________________________________
              From: Constructed Languages List [CONLANG@...] on behalf of Paul Schleitwiler, FCM [pjschleitwilerfcm@...]
              Sent: Wednesday, March 13, 2013 2:50 PM
              To: CONLANG@...
              Subject: Re: OT: Texas German dying out

              Old Wisconsin joke: "Ay ban gettin tired from Yewnited Stayuts. Ay tink ay
              go back tew Minny-SOtah."
              Told by Germans, of course.

              I think that television, with national broadcasters, killed local dialects.
              Que Dios te bendiga de siempre y de todas maneras,
              Paul

              On Wed, Mar 13, 2013 at 6:13 AM, BPJ <bpj@...> wrote:

              > It may be that the accent is lingering while the grammar and vocabulary
              > are gone. It's not quite as likely when two different
              > languages are involved but quite common when local dialects
              > give way to a prestige/'standard' variety of the same language.
              > There is a stereotype heard here in Scandinavia thot people
              > in Minnesota and Wisconsin still speak English with a noticeable
              > Swedish/Norwegian accent. Don't know how accurate it is.
              >
              > /bpj
              >
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