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How to choose the name of a conlang?

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  • Leonardo Castro
    I can t decide a name of the language I have been sketching for a long time. Those are some patterns of language name I have recognized: A.
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 7, 2013
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      I can't decide a name of the language I have been sketching for a long
      time. Those are some patterns of language name I have recognized:

      A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português,
      tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.
      B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
      C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
      Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
      D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?
      E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...
      F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?

      I don't remember any example of the following:

      G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-right-now": this could be done with a
      specific pronoun.

      Which one do you prefer? Does your conlang name fit one of these patterns?

      Até mais!

      Leonardo
    • H. S. Teoh
      ... These are in the category of what others call your language . There s also the question of how the speakers of your language would refer to it, or to
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 7, 2013
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        On Fri, Mar 08, 2013 at 01:00:54AM -0300, Leonardo Castro wrote:
        > I can't decide a name of the language I have been sketching for a long
        > time. Those are some patterns of language name I have recognized:
        >
        > A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português,
        > tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.

        These are in the category of "what others call your language". There's
        also the question of how the speakers of your language would refer to
        it, or to themselves. Examples along these lines would be things like
        "speech", "common speech", "words", "tongue", etc..


        > B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
        > C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
        > Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
        > D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?
        > E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...
        > F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?
        >
        > I don't remember any example of the following:
        >
        > G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-right-now": this could be done with a
        > specific pronoun.
        >
        > Which one do you prefer? Does your conlang name fit one of these
        > patterns?
        [...]

        Ebisédian, my 1st conlang, is not a native name of the language; it's an
        English derivation from 3bis33'di (ɜbisɜˉdi for you Unicode-enabled
        people), which simply means "people" (plural form of "person"), hence,
        the language of the people.

        Tatari Faran, my 2nd conlang, is actually a proper native name; it means
        "speech of Fara". Fara means "the plain" -- the base of a large caldera
        where the people of Fara live.

        So here you have it, one is an external name, and the other is internal.
        I don't know which I *prefer*... generally, a language that has little
        or no outside contact will not have its own name, since there is no
        reason for the speakers of the language to even conceive of multiple
        languages in the first place -- it would simply be *the* language. OTOH,
        languages with lots of outside contact would generally acquire an
        external name from the foreign peoples, or develop their own name as a
        way of distinguishing themselves from the foreign peoples.

        Auxlangs, OTOH, will tend to have an engineered name for whatever
        purpose they are slated for. ;-)


        T

        --
        That's not a bug; that's a feature!
      • Herman Miller
        ... A ( language spoken by people X ) is pretty common, as in Yasaro (the language of the people of the Yasar region) or Tirelat (language of the Tihr
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 7, 2013
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          On 3/7/2013 11:00 PM, Leonardo Castro wrote:
          > I can't decide a name of the language I have been sketching for a long
          > time. Those are some patterns of language name I have recognized:
          >
          > A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português,
          > tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.
          > B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
          > C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
          > Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
          > D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?
          > E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...
          > F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?
          >
          > I don't remember any example of the following:
          >
          > G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-right-now": this could be done with a
          > specific pronoun.
          >
          > Which one do you prefer? Does your conlang name fit one of these patterns?

          A ("language spoken by people X") is pretty common, as in "Yasaro" (the
          language of the people of the Yasar region) or "Tirelat" (language of
          the Tihr people, inhabitants of Tirevor). Originally, though, "Tirelat"
          was named after a kind of bird (a wren). Later I changed the word for
          "wren", but kept the original name for the language.

          C. "Ludiréo", "world language".

          D. "Minza" is named after the Tirelat word for "bridge" (mindza).

          E. "Eklektu" was a rather eclectic language, borrowing words from all
          over the place. "Sarbleski" meant "new secret writing".

          Many names are essentially without any known meaning, like "Lindiga" or
          "Zharranh". For a time I thought there might be a connection between
          "Lindiga" and the "Verrilin" people (with the common element "lin"), but
          currently I've got Lindiga as a Sangari language.
        • Mechthild Czapp
          Hi, ... Rejistanian falls into this category. ... Sibulu probably falls into this one. ... Naeso and Kenshuite He Mo Gie fall into this category. ... It
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 8, 2013
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            Hi,


            > I can't decide a name of the language I have been sketching for a long
            > time. Those are some patterns of language name I have recognized:
            >
            > A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português,
            > tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.
            Rejistanian falls into this category.

            > B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
            > C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
            > Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
            > D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?
            Sibulu probably falls into this one.

            > E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...
            > F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?
            >
            > I don't remember any example of the following:
            >
            > G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-right-now": this could be done with a
            > specific pronoun.
            >
            Naeso and Kenshuite He Mo Gie fall into this category.

            > Which one do you prefer? Does your conlang name fit one of these patterns?
            >
            It depends on the language, doesn't it :)

            > Até mais!
            >
            > Leonardo
          • Jörg Rhiemeier
            Hallo conlangers! ... It always depends on what the conlang is made for. If your conlang is a fictional language, it is best named according to category A, as
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 8, 2013
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              Hallo conlangers!

              On Friday 08 March 2013 05:00:54 Leonardo Castro wrote:

              > I can't decide a name of the language I have been sketching for a long
              > time. Those are some patterns of language name I have recognized:
              >
              > A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português,
              > tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.
              > B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
              > C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
              > Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
              > D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?
              > E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...
              > F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?
              >
              > I don't remember any example of the following:
              >
              > G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-right-now": this could be done with a
              > specific pronoun.
              >
              > Which one do you prefer? Does your conlang name fit one of these patterns?

              It always depends on what the conlang is made for. If your
              conlang is a fictional language, it is best named according to
              category A, as most natlang names are of that sort. If it is
              an auxlang, C makes sense - and *only* if it an auxlang. For
              an engelang or abstract artlang, everything except C makes
              sense.

              What regards my conlangs, most are fictional languages and
              thus have names in category A. The experimental projects
              get provisional designations X-1, X-2, X-3 etc., of which only
              X-3 has meanwhile acquired a self-designation, in category E:
              /kʷətç/ 'language of small time' because the language is an
              attempt at a speedtalk with unisegmental morphemes. The name
              is anglicized as "Quetch".

              --
              ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
              http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
              "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
            • R A Brown
              ... Esperanto wasn t chosen because it is a nice sounding word. It mean one who hopes and was the pseudonym under which Zamenhof published his first book
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 8, 2013
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                On 08/03/2013 04:00, Leonardo Castro wrote:
                > I can't decide a name of the language I have been
                > sketching for a long time. Those are some patterns of
                > language name I have recognized:
                >
                > A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français,
                > Português, tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.
                > B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
                > C."universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
                > Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
                > D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?

                'Esperanto' wasn't chosen because it is a "nice sounding
                word." It mean "one who hopes" and was the pseudonym under
                which Zamenhof published his first book on the
                'International Language' in July 1887. Or rather, the
                pseudonym was "Doktoro Esperanto."

                "Esperanto" was adopted as nickname for the language, but
                soon became its name.

                Whether any other language has been named from a pseudonym
                used by its creator, I don't know. But languages may be
                named arbitrarily by a name that the composer likes; for
                example Claudio Gnoli named his loglang 'Liva' "just because
                [he] liked the sound (it also was the name of a nice girl in
                a Slovak novel I read a long time ago)."

                Which reminds me that one of my many teenage efforts was
                named _Ejl_ /ejl/ from the initials of a girl I was fond off
                at the time :)

                > E. a name related to the features of the language:
                > Lojban, Loglan...

                Engelangs are frequently named according some feature
                according to which the conlang is engineered.

                > F."language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?

                Is that what it means?

                [snip]

                > Does your conlang name fit one of these patterns?

                TAKE, I guess, comes under E, since it is an acronym of _Το
                Ἄνευ Κλίσι Ἑλληνική_ "Greek without inflexions."
                http://www.carolandray.plus.com/TAKE/index.html

                But the other names do not fit any of those patterns.

                'Outidic' is a nickname of the (fictional) 17th cent.
                auxlang of Dr Norman Outis, who actually called the language
                "Lingua Communis."
                http://www.carolandray.plus.com/Outis/index.html

                As for the various names given to creations that have arisen
                from the still unfinished (and probably never to be
                finished) Briefscript project - both Bax and Brx both derive
                from the abbreviation 'BrSc' which was adopted (not by me,
                tho I came to use it also) on both the Auxlang & Conlang
                list several years ago. the name _Piashi_ was derived from
                the pronunciation given to _bax_ in a "Roman character
                syllabary."
                http://www.carolandray.plus.com/Briefscript/Index.html

                As a result of a recent Conlang thread and subsequent
                private emails following it, another conlang will be coming
                along - but I'll post more info at a later date. The name
                has not yet been determined (tho it _might_ be named
                according criterion A above).
                ======================================================

                On 08/03/2013 10:06, Mechthild Czapp wrote:[snip]
                > It depends on the language, doesn't it :)

                and:
                On 08/03/2013 15:28, Jörg Rhiemeier wrote:[snip]
                > It always depends on what the conlang is made for.

                Amen!

                There cannot be any rule of thumb over this. It depends what
                the language is for and, to not a small extent, upon the
                whim of its creator :)

                --
                Ray
                ==================================
                http://www.carolandray.plus.com
                ==================================
                "language … began with half-musical unanalysed expressions
                for individual beings and events."
                [Otto Jespersen, Progress in Language, 1895]
              • Leonardo Castro
                Anauê! As more than one person have said, it depends on what my language is intended to be. I don t have a conculture nor a conworld and I develop my conlang
                Message 7 of 16 , Mar 8, 2013
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                  Anauê!

                  As more than one person have said, it depends on what my language is
                  intended to be. I don't have a conculture nor a conworld and I develop
                  my conlang "as if" it would be useful as an auxlang of ridiculously
                  easy pronunciation for most world's people but keeping word-break
                  detectability and controllable level of ambiguity (you can be as
                  specific as you want).

                  I don't know if a language intended to be auxiliary can be called
                  "auxlang" since its early development (BTW, how do you pronounce
                  "auxlang"?). Besides, although I do have auxlang dreams (phantasies?),
                  I think that an auxiliary language should be maturated (in both its
                  structure and utility range) instead of being completely conceived at
                  once and imposed.

                  In the age of glasses that translate languages in real time and show
                  subtitles, a constructed language has to find another vocation. So, my
                  language is above all an experimental language aimed at ease of
                  pronunciation, parseability and controllable unambiguity.

                  That said, my attempts were as follow, so far:

                  > A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português, tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.

                  * "language of linkers", "language of community", "language of this
                  group"... "linker" has two senses: people who link themselves to
                  others and the "verbs" that link a noun to another ;

                  These names could sound as "Lalinki", "Lankuelinki", "Lanku-e-honti",
                  "Linkalanki", etc. I have also considered using Finnish root for
                  language and naming it "Kielu-e-kuopu" (language spoken by this
                  group).


                  > B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.

                  * no attempt of this kind yet ;

                  > C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
                  > Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.

                  It could be "Lankue Monti" (language of world people, also spelled
                  "Lanku-e-monti"), "Montalanku", etc.

                  As the compound "Lanku-e-monti" would be literally "the language of
                  the people of the world", it could be ambiguous as it could refer to
                  another better succeeded auxlang. But, if an auxlang has to use an
                  expression "language of the world" to refer to another language, it
                  might be interpreted as a declaration of failure. :-)

                  A solution is to use some particles that make sure that it's a proper
                  noun, but it would sound as "liu-lanku-e-monti-lui-loi" (
                  open-parenthesis language of the world people close-parenthesis
                  proper-noun-particle ).

                  > D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?

                  * I've considered using the three main articulations (labial, coronal,
                  gutural), different vowels and a nasal stop: "Lihanpu", "Hamontu",
                  "Limantu", etc. The name itself would be a demonstration of the
                  language sounds.

                  > E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...

                  * The aforesaid names with "link-" fall into this category too,
                  because my language is binary, based on "links" between things (kind
                  of "oriented graphs").

                  > F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?

                  * I don't like this option and I don't even know what my name sounds
                  like in my conlang yet. This kind of name would arise only if other
                  people started referring to my language as "Leonardo's language".

                  > I don't remember any example of the following:
                  >
                  > G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-
                  right-now": this could be done with a
                  > specific pronoun.

                  * with the particle "kou" that means "related to this text", it could
                  be "lanku-kou".

                  Do any of these names sound beautiful, funny or cacophonic to you? I
                  hope that avoiding voiced consonants doesn't make them sound as
                  "primitive". :-P Actually, you can pronounce any consonant voiced or
                  voiceless.

                  Até mais!

                  Leonardo


                  2013/3/8 Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...>:
                  > Hallo conlangers!
                  >
                  > On Friday 08 March 2013 05:00:54 Leonardo Castro wrote:
                  >
                  >> I can't decide a name of the language I have been sketching for a long
                  >> time. Those are some patterns of language name I have recognized:
                  >>
                  >> A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português,
                  >> tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.
                  >> B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
                  >> C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
                  >> Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
                  >> D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?
                  >> E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...
                  >> F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?
                  >>
                  >> I don't remember any example of the following:
                  >>
                  >> G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-right-now": this could be done with a
                  >> specific pronoun.
                  >>
                  >> Which one do you prefer? Does your conlang name fit one of these patterns?
                  >
                  > It always depends on what the conlang is made for. If your
                  > conlang is a fictional language, it is best named according to
                  > category A, as most natlang names are of that sort. If it is
                  > an auxlang, C makes sense - and *only* if it an auxlang. For
                  > an engelang or abstract artlang, everything except C makes
                  > sense.
                  >
                  > What regards my conlangs, most are fictional languages and
                  > thus have names in category A. The experimental projects
                  > get provisional designations X-1, X-2, X-3 etc., of which only
                  > X-3 has meanwhile acquired a self-designation, in category E:
                  > /kʷətç/ 'language of small time' because the language is an
                  > attempt at a speedtalk with unisegmental morphemes. The name
                  > is anglicized as "Quetch".
                  >
                  > --
                  > ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
                  > http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
                  > "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
                • phil@...
                  How about mixing E and F?  Leonlanku  or LeonLink  :-)   --Ph. D. 
                  Message 8 of 16 , Mar 8, 2013
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                    How about mixing E and F?  "Leonlanku" or "LeonLink"  :-)
                     
                    --Ph. D. 

                    Leonardo Castro <leolucas1980@...> wrote:
                    > Anauê!
                    >
                    > As more than one person have said, it depends on what my language is
                    > intended to be. I don't have a conculture nor a conworld and I develop
                    > my conlang "as if" it would be useful as an auxlang of ridiculously
                    > easy pronunciation for most world's people but keeping word-break
                    > detectability and controllable level of ambiguity (you can be as
                    > specific as you want).
                    >
                    > I don't know if a language intended to be auxiliary can be called
                    > "auxlang" since its early development (BTW, how do you pronounce
                    > "auxlang"?). Besides, although I do have auxlang dreams (phantasies?),
                    > I think that an auxiliary language should be maturated (in both its
                    > structure and utility range) instead of being completely conceived at
                    > once and imposed.
                    >
                    > In the age of glasses that translate languages in real time and show
                    > subtitles, a constructed language has to find another vocation. So, my
                    > language is above all an experimental language aimed at ease of
                    > pronunciation, parseability and controllable unambiguity.
                    >
                    > That said, my attempts were as follow, so far:
                    >
                    > > A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português,
                    > tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.
                    >
                    > * "language of linkers", "language of community", "language of this
                    > group"... "linker" has two senses: people who link themselves to
                    > others and the "verbs" that link a noun to another ;
                    >
                    > These names could sound as "Lalinki", "Lankuelinki", "Lanku-e-honti",
                    > "Linkalanki", etc. I have also considered using Finnish root for
                    > language and naming it "Kielu-e-kuopu" (language spoken by this
                    > group).
                    >
                    >
                    > > B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
                    >
                    > * no attempt of this kind yet ;
                    >
                    > > C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
                    > > Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
                    >
                    > It could be "Lankue Monti" (language of world people, also spelled
                    > "Lanku-e-monti"), "Montalanku", etc.
                    >
                    > As the compound "Lanku-e-monti" would be literally "the language of
                    > the people of the world", it could be ambiguous as it could refer to
                    > another better succeeded auxlang. But, if an auxlang has to use an
                    > expression "language of the world" to refer to another language, it
                    > might be interpreted as a declaration of failure. :-)
                    >
                    > A solution is to use some particles that make sure that it's a proper
                    > noun, but it would sound as "liu-lanku-e-monti-lui-loi" (
                    > open-parenthesis language of the world people close-parenthesis
                    > proper-noun-particle ).
                    >
                    > > D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?
                    >
                    > * I've considered using the three main articulations (labial, coronal,
                    > gutural), different vowels and a nasal stop: "Lihanpu", "Hamontu",
                    > "Limantu", etc. The name itself would be a demonstration of the
                    > language sounds.
                    >
                    > > E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...
                    >
                    > * The aforesaid names with "link-" fall into this category too,
                    > because my language is binary, based on "links" between things (kind
                    > of "oriented graphs").
                    >
                    > > F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?
                    >
                    > * I don't like this option and I don't even know what my name sounds
                    > like in my conlang yet. This kind of name would arise only if other
                    > people started referring to my language as "Leonardo's language".
                    >
                    > > I don't remember any example of the following:
                    > >
                    > > G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-
                    > right-now": this could be done with a
                    > > specific pronoun.
                    >
                    > * with the particle "kou" that means "related to this text", it could
                    > be "lanku-kou".
                    >
                    > Do any of these names sound beautiful, funny or cacophonic to you? I
                    > hope that avoiding voiced consonants doesn't make them sound as
                    > "primitive". :-P Actually, you can pronounce any consonant voiced or
                    > voiceless.
                    >
                    > Até mais!
                    >
                    > Leonardo
                  • Leonardo Castro
                    ... With the phonotactic restrictions of the language, it could be Liolanku , Lionlanku , Liolinku or Lionlinku . I m almost sure that they don t cause
                    Message 9 of 16 , Mar 8, 2013
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                      2013/3/8 <phil@...>:
                      > How about mixing E and F? "Leonlanku" or "LeonLink" :-)

                      With the phonotactic restrictions of the language, it could be
                      "Liolanku", "Lionlanku", "Liolinku" or "Lionlinku". I'm almost sure
                      that they don't cause problems to my word-break detectability system.
                      This name could encourage me to advance more quickly, as I would feel
                      that this is only a game of mine with no other obligations. Word
                      phonology is very closely related to word class in this language, so I
                      have to think about how I'm going to harmonize them, because I just
                      realized that I don't have good rules to create proper nouns except
                      for a particle that "properizes" common nouns.


                      >
                      > --Ph. D.
                      >
                      >
                      > Leonardo Castro <leolucas1980@...> wrote:
                      >>
                      >> Anauê!
                      >>
                      >> As more than one person have said, it depends on what my language is
                      >> intended to be. I don't have a conculture nor a conworld and I develop
                      >> my conlang "as if" it would be useful as an auxlang of ridiculously
                      >> easy pronunciation for most world's people but keeping word-break
                      >> detectability and controllable level of ambiguity (you can be as
                      >> specific as you want).
                      >> I don't know if a language intended to be auxiliary can be called
                      >> "auxlang" since its early development (BTW, how do you pronounce
                      >> "auxlang"?). Besides, although I do have auxlang dreams (phantasies?),
                      >> I think that an auxiliary language should be maturated (in both its
                      >> structure and utility range) instead of being completely conceived at
                      >> once and imposed.
                      >> In the age of glasses that translate languages in real time and show
                      >> subtitles, a constructed language has to find another vocation. So, my
                      >> language is above all an experimental language aimed at ease of
                      >> pronunciation, parseability and controllable unambiguity.
                      >> That said, my attempts were as follow, so far:
                      >>
                      >> > A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português, tlhIngan
                      >> > Hol (?), etc.
                      >> * "language of linkers", "language of community", "language of this
                      >> group"... "linker" has two senses: people who link themselves to
                      >> others and the "verbs" that link a noun to another ;
                      >>
                      >> These names could sound as "Lalinki", "Lankuelinki", "Lanku-e-honti",
                      >> "Linkalanki", etc. I have also considered using Finnish root for
                      >> language and naming it "Kielu-e-kuopu" (language spoken by this
                      >> group).
                      >>
                      >> > B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
                      >> * no attempt of this kind yet ;
                      >>
                      >> > C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
                      >> > Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
                      >> It could be "Lankue Monti" (language of world people, also spelled
                      >> "Lanku-e-monti"), "Montalanku", etc.
                      >> As the compound "Lanku-e-monti" would be literally "the language of
                      >> the people of the world", it could be ambiguous as it could refer to
                      >> another better succeeded auxlang. But, if an auxlang has to use an
                      >> expression "language of the world" to refer to another language, it
                      >> might be interpreted as a declaration of failure. :-)
                      >>
                      >> A solution is to use some particles that make sure that it's a proper
                      >> noun, but it would sound as "liu-lanku-e-monti-lui-loi" (
                      >> open-parenthesis language of the world people close-parenthesis
                      >> proper-noun-particle ).
                      >> > D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?
                      >>
                      >> * I've considered using the three main articulations (labial, coronal,
                      >> gutural), different vowels and a nasal stop: "Lihanpu", "Hamontu",
                      >> "Limantu", etc. The name itself would be a demonstration of the
                      >> language sounds.
                      >> > E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...
                      >> * The aforesaid names with "link-" fall into this category too,
                      >> because my language is binary, based on "links" between things (kind
                      >> of "oriented graphs").
                      >> > F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?
                      >>
                      >> * I don't like this option and I don't even know what my name sounds
                      >> like in my conlang yet. This kind of name would arise only if other
                      >> people started referring to my language as "Leonardo's language".
                      >> > I don't remember any example of the following:
                      >> >
                      >> > G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-
                      >> right-now": this could be done with a
                      >> > specific pronoun.
                      >> * with the particle "kou" that means "related to this text", it could
                      >> be "lanku-kou".
                      >> Do any of these names sound beautiful, funny or cacophonic to you? I
                      >> hope that avoiding voiced consonants doesn't make them sound as
                      >> "primitive". :-P Actually, you can pronounce any consonant voiced or
                      >> voiceless.
                      >> Até mais!
                      >>
                      >> Leonardo
                    • Padraic Brown
                      ... I am sure there is no actual connection, but I do find a delicious irony between this language, Quetch, and its self professed conservation of time as a
                      Message 10 of 16 , Mar 8, 2013
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                        --- On Fri, 3/8/13, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...> wrote:

                        > /kʷətç/ 'language of small time' because the language is
                        > an attempt at a speedtalk with unisegmental morphemes. 
                        > The name is anglicized as "Quetch".

                        I am sure there is no actual connection, but I do find a delicious irony
                        between this language, Quetch, and its self professed conservation of time
                        as a design goal, and the Yiddish near-sound-alike word, kvetch, which
                        is anything but, being a long and interminably drawn out complaint about
                        something.

                        Every time I hear someone kvetching on and on about some issue, I'll always
                        think to myself: ah, if only they were Quetching! They wouldn't waste even
                        a tenth the time it takes to complain about nothing at such great length!

                        Padraic
                      • Carsten Becker
                        ... And then, there s German, whose self-designation, Deutsch, just meant people-ish originally, from Germ.-MLat. theodiscus belonging to one s own people ,
                        Message 11 of 16 , Mar 9, 2013
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                          On Fri, 8 Mar 2013 13:36:27 -0300, Leonardo Castro <leolucas1980@...> wrote:

                          >> A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português, tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.
                          >
                          >* "language of linkers", "language of community", "language of this
                          >group"... "linker" has two senses: people who link themselves to
                          >others and the "verbs" that link a noun to another ;

                          And then, there's German, whose self-designation, Deutsch, just meant 'people-ish' originally, from Germ.-MLat. theodiscus 'belonging to one's own people', cf. PG *þeuðō 'people' + -isk- 'adj. related to' (OHG thiutisk, MHG tiutsch), according to the dwds.de entry for 'deutsch'. It's of course also the origin of the word Dutch.

                          I have nothing figured out yet for my own conlang, but it's been peeving me for some time already that I made the name in -i, since -i is not a derivative morpheme in this language. People have suggested that it might be an exonym. OTOH, the people's endonym might be Ayer, though that'd be an unusual word in the language, since only few words end in -r. I don't remember if I coined aye 'people, crew' from that consciously; a word for 'people' I coined later anyway and which I used more frequently is keynam. As alternatives based on what was listed here before, there would be narān 'language' (< nara- 'to speak'), narān ban 'good language', narān biming 'understandable language'. 'Language of the people' would be _narān keynamena_.

                          Carsten
                        • H. S. Teoh
                          On Sat, Mar 09, 2013 at 07:15:46AM -0500, Carsten Becker wrote: [...] ... [...] Well, you can always retcon Ayer as an archaic root that has managed to
                          Message 12 of 16 , Mar 9, 2013
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                            On Sat, Mar 09, 2013 at 07:15:46AM -0500, Carsten Becker wrote:
                            [...]
                            > I have nothing figured out yet for my own conlang, but it's been
                            > peeving me for some time already that I made the name in -i, since -i
                            > is not a derivative morpheme in this language. People have suggested
                            > that it might be an exonym. OTOH, the people's endonym might be Ayer,
                            > though that'd be an unusual word in the language, since only few words
                            > end in -r.
                            [...]

                            Well, you can always retcon "Ayer" as an archaic root that has managed
                            to retain its original form (or close analogue thereof) after the rest
                            of the language has moved on. This kind of thing happens a lot in
                            natlangs -- certain very common expressions and nouns get calcified in
                            their archaic form(s), long after the language has changed so that those
                            expressions are no longer grammatical or now misfit the current
                            structures.


                            T

                            --
                            If lightning were to ever strike an orchestra, it'd always hit the conductor first.
                          • Jörg Rhiemeier
                            Hallo conlangers! ... I did notice the similarity to German _quetschen_ to squeeze , which is may etymologically be the same as Yiddish _kvetch_ (if the
                            Message 13 of 16 , Mar 10, 2013
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                              Hallo conlangers!

                              On Saturday 09 March 2013 02:49:15 Padraic Brown wrote:

                              > --- On Fri, 3/8/13, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...> wrote:
                              > > /kʷətç/ 'language of small time' because the language is
                              > > an attempt at a speedtalk with unisegmental morphemes.
                              > > The name is anglicized as "Quetch".
                              >
                              > I am sure there is no actual connection, but I do find a delicious irony
                              > between this language, Quetch, and its self professed conservation of time
                              > as a design goal, and the Yiddish near-sound-alike word, kvetch, which
                              > is anything but, being a long and interminably drawn out complaint about
                              > something.

                              I did notice the similarity to German _quetschen_ 'to squeeze',
                              which is may etymologically be the same as Yiddish _kvetch_
                              (if the latter is not instead related to _quatschen_ 'to
                              chat'), but this is not intended. The choice of /kʷ/ for
                              'to speak; language' is inspired by various words in Quenya
                              (the name _Quenya_ itself which means just 'language'), Old
                              Albic (_cvatha_ 'to speak') and English (_quoth_) beginning
                              with /kw/ and expressing notions related to speaking; that
                              of /t/ 'time' by the international physical formula symbol
                              for time, that of /ç/ 'small' by the German diminiutive
                              ending -chen.

                              But the language can indeed be considered one which attempts
                              to squeeze everything into expressions as short as possible.
                              So, from the German vantage point, it is aptly named!

                              > Every time I hear someone kvetching on and on about some issue, I'll always
                              > think to myself: ah, if only they were Quetching! They wouldn't waste even
                              > a tenth the time it takes to complain about nothing at such great length!

                              ;)

                              I don't know yet how concise Quetch will be in actual practice;
                              I expect the brevity of its roots to be to a considerable part
                              cancelled out by the need of many multi-member compounds.

                              --
                              ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
                              http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
                              "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
                            • R A Brown
                              On 08/03/2013 16:16, R A Brown wrote: [snip] ... The name is still to be determined! But I have posted a page about the language:
                              Message 14 of 16 , Mar 11, 2013
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                                On 08/03/2013 16:16, R A Brown wrote:
                                [snip]
                                >
                                > As a result of a recent Conlang thread and subsequent
                                > private emails following it, another conlang will be
                                > coming along - but I'll post more info at a later date.
                                > The name has not yet been determined (tho it _might_ be
                                > named according criterion A above).

                                The name is still to be determined! But I have posted a page
                                about the language:
                                http://www.carolandray.plus.com/Britannic/index.html

                                I know the page will read as heresy to some ;)

                                But it is something I have been urged to do by more than one
                                person in the past. So far I've hesitated, not least
                                because of the thought of turning out "yet another Romance
                                conlang."

                                Meanwhile work is progressing slowing on Outidic. A page on
                                pronouns is online and one on prepositions, conjunctions etc
                                is under construction:
                                http://www.carolandray.plus.com/Outis/Pronouns.html
                                http://www.carolandray.plus.com/Outis/Prep_Conj_Adv.html

                                There is also a PDF document with some Outidic vocabulary:
                                http://www.carolandray.plus.com/Outis/Vocabulary.pdf

                                I intend to finish the Outidic pages first, before
                                developing the British Romlang.

                                --
                                Ray
                                ==================================
                                http://www.carolandray.plus.com
                                ==================================
                                "language … began with half-musical unanalysed expressions
                                for individual beings and events."
                                [Otto Jespersen, Progress in Language, 1895]
                              • Anthony Miles
                                ... I m all over the map on this. Siye and Ulok, both Martian tongues, mean speech/to speak . The other Martian language, Utu Nes, the extinct language of the
                                Message 15 of 16 , Mar 15, 2013
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                                  > I can't decide a name of the language I have been sketching for a long
                                  > time. Those are some patterns of language name I have recognized:
                                  >
                                  > A. "language-spoken-by-people-X": English, Français, Português,
                                  > tlhIngan Hol (?), etc.

                                  I'm all over the map on this. Siye and Ulok, both Martian tongues, mean "speech/to speak". The other Martian language, Utu Nes, the extinct language of the Ulok capital of the Kingdom of Nesa has name that relates to dreaming (maybe; the records are sparse). Koha, believe it or not, is ultimately from "(die) Deutsche (Sprache)", but in Koha is just the Koha name for Koha (German is "ki Koha ho Elopa" - "the Koha of Europe"). Na'gifi Fasu'xa means "Common Tongue". Cheyoon (also known as Mermish) might mean something, but I don't know what. Fortunatian and its various translations is the name of the place where Fortunatian is spoken. Wy 'Luthwy (a crude Hellenic analog to Brithenig) means "The Speech". Kingspeech is an exonym applied to the speech of the Kingsmen by the Transpositive Men. I don't recall what the the Ri' of naReNga Ri' is, and my dictionary is at home, but naReNga means tongue. Gweiric is an ethnonym as well as a language name, and its older name, Lahabic, just means "of the island". Ngiaera (not yet posted) is a name I picked to illustrate some of the salient features of Ngiaera. And of course, many are just "numbered conlangs".


                                  > B. "good language": Toki Pona, Nhengatu, etc.
                                  > C. "universal/international/World language": Mundolinco,
                                  > Universalglot, Interlingua, etc.
                                  > D. some nice sounding word: Esperanto, any other?
                                  Sibulu probably falls into this one.

                                  > E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...
                                  > F. "language-of-person-X": Xorban, any other?



                                  > G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-right-now": this could be done with a
                                  > specific pronoun.
                                • Jim Henry
                                  ... gjâ-zym-byn s primary name glosses as language-thought-hack , a ... In writing in gzb, I often refer to it as gjâ kŏ , language this . Most of my
                                  Message 16 of 16 , Mar 16, 2013
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                                    On Thu, Mar 7, 2013 at 11:00 PM, Leonardo Castro <leolucas1980@...> wrote:
                                    > E. a name related to the features of the language: Lojban, Loglan...

                                    gjâ-zym-byn's primary name glosses as "language-thought-hack", a
                                    language for experimenting with thought. But:

                                    > G. "this-language-I'm-speaking-right-now": this could be done with a
                                    > specific pronoun.

                                    In writing in gzb, I often refer to it as "gjâ kŏ", "language this".

                                    Most of my other languages are named for their speakers. Lusanja is a
                                    nominalization of a first person plural verb, "we speak".

                                    --
                                    Jim Henry
                                    http://www.pobox.com/~jimhenry/
                                    http://www.jimhenrymedicaltrust.org
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