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Re: Related to the recent discussion about counting the number of possible English sentences

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  • Roger Mills
    ... Only in the singular: el libro (the book) vs. él (he). In the plural it s los libros (the books) vs. ellos (they [m or mixed]). stevo Also, I believe
    Message 1 of 42 , Mar 1, 2013
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      --- On Fri, 3/1/13, MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...> wrote:

      > In Spanish, the masculine definite article is identical to the nominative
      > of the masculine pronoun (though in writing, the pronoun is spelled with an
      > acute accent to disambiguate).

      Only in the singular: el libro (the book) vs. él (he). In the plural it's
      "los libros" (the books) vs. ellos (they [m or mixed]).

      stevo

      Also, I believe the pronominal forms _lo_
      > and _la_ (object forms of some kind -- often cliticised to the verb) are
      > also used as a kind of article, though I'm not sure what to call it.

      ================================================

      lo is the masc. object pronoun; la of course is the fem. def. art and also the object pronoun (plural ellas, las parallel with ellos, los.)

      lo is also used to form "neuter" nouns < adjectives, but with a special meaning-- lo bueno can be just "the good", but more often I think means 'the good thing is....' or 'the good part is...'   I'm not sure you can use it with every adjective
    • Leonardo Castro
      ... In Portuguese, the object pronouns have exactly the same form of the definite articles: o, a, os, as . But sometimes the object pronouns can be written
      Message 42 of 42 , Mar 2, 2013
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        2013/3/2 Roger Mills <romiltz@...>:
        > --- On Fri, 3/1/13, MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...> wrote:
        >
        >> In Spanish, the masculine definite article is identical to the nominative
        >> of the masculine pronoun (though in writing, the pronoun is spelled with an
        >> acute accent to disambiguate).
        >
        > Only in the singular: el libro (the book) vs. él (he). In the plural it's
        > "los libros" (the books) vs. ellos (they [m or mixed]).
        >
        > stevo
        >
        > Also, I believe the pronominal forms _lo_
        >> and _la_ (object forms of some kind -- often cliticised to the verb) are
        >> also used as a kind of article, though I'm not sure what to call it.
        >
        > ================================================
        >
        > lo is the masc. object pronoun; la of course is the fem. def. art and also the object pronoun (plural ellas, las parallel with ellos, los.)
        >
        > lo is also used to form "neuter" nouns < adjectives, but with a special meaning-- lo bueno can be just "the good", but more often I think means 'the good thing is....' or 'the good part is...' I'm not sure you can use it with every adjective

        In Portuguese, the object pronouns have exactly the same form of the
        definite articles: "o, a, os, as" . But sometimes the object pronouns
        can be written as "lo, la, los, las / no, na, nos, nas" for
        phonotactics reasons.
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