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Koha

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  • Anthony Miles
    Koha is a German-derived language spoken on the Earth of the Eis-Lehre-Welt (ELW) cosm of the Polycosm, the equivalent of all the Pacific Ocean creoles on
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 6, 2013
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      Koha is a German-derived language spoken on the Earth of the "Eis-Lehre-Welt (ELW)" cosm of the Polycosm, the equivalent of all the Pacific Ocean creoles on OTL's Earth. It started as an slow-burning experiment in late 2011 to see how much of German syntax could survive extreme simplification (most of it, as it turns out).
      There are two genders, male and female: definite, 'ka' and 'ki', indefinite, 'a' and 'ana'.
      Plural number is indicated by a post-posed 'hi' (< fi < viel).
      'ka haka' 'the father' 'ka haka hi' 'the fathers'
      'ki moka' 'the mother' 'ki moka hi' 'the mothers'
      Standard present tense word order is SVO
      Ka haka he'a ki moka. The father sees the mother.
      Past tense is SAOV
      Ka haka apa ki moka he'a. The father saw the mother.
      Future tense is SAOV
      Ka haka vaka ki moka he'a. The father will see the mother.
      Present interrogative is VSO
      He'a ka haka ki moka?
      Does the father see the mother?
      Past interrogative is ASOV
      Apa ka haka ki moka he'a?
      Did the father see the mother?
      Future interrogative is ASOV
      Vaka ka haka ki moka he'a?
      Will the father see the mother?
      I'll skip the negatives for now.
      Passive also uses 'ho'.
      Ki moka apa ho ka haka he'a.
      The personal pronouns are: mi, ku, a, hi, vi, o, hi hi.
      The genitive construction is X ho Y:
      ki koka ho ka mena. the daughter of the man.
    • Herman Miller
      ... I like this; it looks vaguely Pacific at first glance, but you can see the Germanic roots if you point them out. Interesting though that it appears to have
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 7, 2013
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        On 2/6/2013 10:49 PM, Anthony Miles wrote:
        > Koha is a German-derived language spoken on the Earth of the
        > "Eis-Lehre-Welt (ELW)" cosm of the Polycosm, the equivalent of all
        > the Pacific Ocean creoles on OTL's Earth. It started as an
        > slow-burning experiment in late 2011 to see how much of German syntax
        > could survive extreme simplification (most of it, as it turns out).

        I like this; it looks vaguely Pacific at first glance, but you can see
        the Germanic roots if you point them out. Interesting though that it
        appears to have /o/ but no /u/. (I'd have expected "muka" for "mother".)
      • Anthony Miles
        ... Na mi me a ka ku ena ka voka ho Koha Elopa hi he a. (It pleases me [schmeckt, not passt gut] that you can see the words from [European] German.). /u/ is a
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 12, 2013
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          On 2/6/2013 10:49 PM, Anthony Miles wrote:
          >> Koha is a German-derived language spoken on the Earth of the
          >> "Eis-Lehre-Welt (ELW)" cosm of the Polycosm, the equivalent of all
          >> the Pacific Ocean creoles on OTL's Earth. It started as an
          >> slow-burning experiment in late 2011 to see how much of German syntax
          >> could survive extreme simplification (most of it, as it turns out).

          >I like this; it looks vaguely Pacific at first glance, but you can see
          >the Germanic roots if you point them out. Interesting though that it
          >appears to have /o/ but no /u/. (I'd have expected "muka" for "mother".)

          Na mi me'a ka ku 'ena ka voka ho Koha Elopa hi he'a. (It pleases me [schmeckt, not passt gut] that you can see the words from [European] German.). /u/ is a phoneme in Koha - the Tosa (pre-Koha) word for "mother" was 'ti muta'. Rule:
          u > o/_Ca#
          Note that /e/ does not exhibit this behavior.
          The vocabulary of Koha is a bit small, but it was used as a contact language, so KISS applies.
        • Roger Mills
          ... Na mi me a ka ku ena ka voka ho Koha Elopa hi he a. (It pleases me [schmeckt, not passt gut] that you can see the words from [European] German.). RM That
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 15, 2013
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            --- On Tue, 2/12/13, Anthony Miles <mamercus88@...> wrote:


            On 2/6/2013 10:49 PM, Anthony Miles wrote:
            >> Koha is a German-derived language spoken on the Earth of the
            >> "Eis-Lehre-Welt (ELW)" cosm of the Polycosm, the equivalent of all
            >> the Pacific Ocean creoles on OTL's Earth. It started as an
            >> slow-burning experiment in late 2011 to see how much of German syntax
            >> could survive extreme simplification (most of it, as it turns out).

            >I like this; it looks vaguely Pacific at first glance, but you can see
            >the Germanic roots if you point them out. Interesting though that it
            >appears to have /o/ but no /u/. (I'd have expected "muka" for "mother".)

            Na mi me'a ka ku 'ena ka voka ho Koha Elopa hi he'a. (It pleases me [schmeckt, not passt gut] that you can see the words from [European] German.).

            RM That was my first impression too. Knowing a bit about Polynesian sound changes helped,....

            /u/ is a phoneme in Koha - the Tosa (pre-Koha) word for "mother" was 'ti muta'. Rule:
            u > o/_Ca#
            Note that /e/ does not exhibit this behavior.

            RM the u > o/ __Ca# is a common though sporadic change in Oceania. Also true of i > e /__Ca#. And to top it off, you can also have (sporadic again)
            a > o > __Cu# and a > e/__Ci#. Makes cognate-hunting a tricky operation :-)))

            The vocabulary of Koha is a bit small, but it was used as a contact language, so KISS applies.

            RM I found it interesting and rather amusing. Years ago, another conlanger and I tried to devise a Latin-Polynesian language (based on the idea of a lost Roman trading vessel), but it didn't get very far..... Polynesian sound changes produced way too many homonyms from the Latin.
          • Anthony Miles
            ... Na mi me a ka ku ena ka voka ho Koha Elopa hi he a. (It pleases me [schmeckt, not passt gut] that you can see the words from [European] German.). RM That
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 19, 2013
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              --- On Tue, 2/12/13, Anthony Miles <mamercus88@...> wrote:


              On 2/6/2013 10:49 PM, Anthony Miles wrote:
              >> Koha is a German-derived language spoken on the Earth of the
              >> "Eis-Lehre-Welt (ELW)" cosm of the Polycosm, the equivalent of all
              >> the Pacific Ocean creoles on OTL's Earth. It started as an
              >> slow-burning experiment in late 2011 to see how much of German syntax
              >> could survive extreme simplification (most of it, as it turns out).

              >I like this; it looks vaguely Pacific at first glance, but you can see
              >the Germanic roots if you point them out. Interesting though that it
              >appears to have /o/ but no /u/. (I'd have expected "muka" for "mother".)

              Na mi me'a ka ku 'ena ka voka ho Koha Elopa hi he'a. (It pleases me [schmeckt, not passt gut] that you can see the words from [European] German.).

              RM That was my first impression too. Knowing a bit about Polynesian sound changes helped,....

              /u/ is a phoneme in Koha - the Tosa (pre-Koha) word for "mother" was 'ti muta'. Rule:
              u > o/_Ca#
              Note that /e/ does not exhibit this behavior.

              RM the u > o/ __Ca# is a common though sporadic change in Oceania. Also true of i > e /__Ca#. And to top it off, you can also have (sporadic again)
              a > o > __Cu# and a > e/__Ci#. Makes cognate-hunting a tricky operation :-)))

              The vocabulary of Koha is a bit small, but it was used as a contact language, so KISS applies.

              RM I found it interesting and rather amusing. Years ago, another conlanger and I tried to devise a Latin-Polynesian language (based on the idea of a lost Roman trading vessel), but it didn't get very far..... Polynesian sound changes
              produced way too many homonyms from the Latin.

              AM:
              I remember that conlang. It looked like fun. There was a lively discussion about the diachronics of 'porcus'.
              Originally, I was going to have other rules besides u>0/_Ca#, includig i>e/C_# but too many words ended up /CaCa/. Which might be fun if I had planned to expose Koha to a Semitic verbal system (not in the ELW, however; that's for German stuff), but I wanted to keep the experiment simple. I realized early on that the small vocabulary would be a problem; Koha speakers solve those ambiguities with adjectives. The singular form is usally the one that survives in Koha, unless the signular form is really, really short (/mena/ not /ma/).

              For those who are curious, Tosa had three cases, but massive confusion between the default cases of a Philippine language and default cases of Tosa led to the disappearance of case altogether.

              Avikahea! (Aufwiedersehen!)
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