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Re: Gripping language mini-documentary

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  • MorphemeAddict
    In the videos, it s emphasized that the gripping language is an exactly-two-person communication scheme, but it occurs to me that more people could participate
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 3, 2013
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      In the videos, it's emphasized that the gripping language is an
      exactly-two-person communication scheme, but it occurs to me that more
      people could participate together, with hands held in a chain or circle.
      Has this been explored at all?

      stevo

      On Sun, Feb 3, 2013 at 1:34 AM, Sai <sai@...> wrote:

      > In 2010, Jake Sollins shot this mini documentary about the gripping
      > language +Alex Fink & I made (000024.org/conlang/gripping.html); it's
      > just now online:
      >
      > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqiBHRJUAkg
      >
      > It's kinda sappy, more about the coupley-ness of the project than its
      > linguistics, but still cute. (He caught some footage of my reaction to
      > skritching… >.>)
      >
      > FWIW, we never really got the language into a fully usable state; we
      > got distracted by UNLWS (saizai.com/nlws) instead, which is the main
      > language we've worked on for the last couple years (and something we
      > can actually use for real-time communication in to some extent, unlike
      > gripping). Anyway, enjoy.
      >
      > - Sai
      >
    • Sai
      Interesting point. It hasn t come up. FWIW though, I think it d still be true that any particular communication *would* still be pair based; it just means that
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 3, 2013
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        Interesting point. It hasn't come up. FWIW though, I think it'd still
        be true that any particular communication *would* still be pair based;
        it just means that any person can have two parallel conversations (if
        they're good enough).

        Also FWIW, we found that perception is overall a much harder skill
        than production. It's why we eliminated various other potential
        movements that could've expanded the phoneme range; they just weren't
        reliably distinguishable enough. Plus the experience is different as
        sub or dom (yes yes, snicker), again more for the recipient than the
        producer.

        - Sai

        On Sun, Feb 3, 2013 at 8:32 AM, MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...> wrote:
        > In the videos, it's emphasized that the gripping language is an
        > exactly-two-person communication scheme, but it occurs to me that more
        > people could participate together, with hands held in a chain or circle.
        > Has this been explored at all?
        >
        > stevo
        >
        > On Sun, Feb 3, 2013 at 1:34 AM, Sai <sai@...> wrote:
        >
        >> In 2010, Jake Sollins shot this mini documentary about the gripping
        >> language +Alex Fink & I made (000024.org/conlang/gripping.html); it's
        >> just now online:
        >>
        >> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqiBHRJUAkg
        >>
        >> It's kinda sappy, more about the coupley-ness of the project than its
        >> linguistics, but still cute. (He caught some footage of my reaction to
        >> skritching… >.>)
        >>
        >> FWIW, we never really got the language into a fully usable state; we
        >> got distracted by UNLWS (saizai.com/nlws) instead, which is the main
        >> language we've worked on for the last couple years (and something we
        >> can actually use for real-time communication in to some extent, unlike
        >> gripping). Anyway, enjoy.
        >>
        >> - Sai
        >>
      • Alex Fink
        ... I thought it had come up. Given you say it hadn t, I wonder if I was talking about it with Parker instead. We spent a little bit of time thinking about
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 3, 2013
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          On Sun, 3 Feb 2013 11:03:45 -0800, Sai <sai@...> wrote:
          >On Sun, Feb 3, 2013 at 8:32 AM, MorphemeAddict <lytlesw@...> wrote:
          >> In the videos, it's emphasized that the gripping language is an
          >> exactly-two-person communication scheme, but it occurs to me that more
          >> people could participate together, with hands held in a chain or circle.
          >> Has this been explored at all?
          >>
          >> stevo
          >
          >Interesting point. It hasn't come up. FWIW though, I think it'd still
          >be true that any particular communication *would* still be pair based;
          >it just means that any person can have two parallel conversations (if
          >they're good enough).

          I thought it had come up. Given you say it hadn't, I wonder if I was talking about it with Parker instead. We spent a little bit of time thinking about it in as a potential gripping-native performance art. In the chain of people clasping hands, let one be a storyteller talking to the people next to them, taking generous breaks between sentence-ish chunks for the recipient to convey each chunk along down the line. The interesting artistic potential then arises in what successive people do with the story: it could be passed on as verbatim as capable, human microphone style; or with silliness preferred to fidelity, Chinese whispers style; or sticking to the main thread of the story but allowing various sorts of rephrasing or re-connoting or re-perspectivising or allusional recasting.

          As for genuine conversations with multiple parties speaking, three people in a triangle should be completely unproblematic (if they're all linguistically ambidextrous). More people would need passing-along mechanics again; I guess you could avoid collisions if you used a circular arrangement and directed all the communication to flow one way round the circle.

          Alex
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