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Re: Conlang music (was RE: Orthography congruous to pronunciation)

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  • Adam Walker
    the simple answer is *here s* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria s coast, about to Oran. Adam
    Message 1 of 27 , Jan 24, 2013
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      the simple answer is *here's* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from
      the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria's coast, about to
      Oran.

      Adam

      On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 12:11 PM, Garth Wallace <gwalla@...> wrote:

      > On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 8:48 AM, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
      > > I haven't really made up my mind about Carraxan music either. One
      > > thing I continually debate is how much influence Arab music should
      > > have. Should Carraxan music use the quarter tones? Should it sould
      > > like Sardinian or Corsican polyphony? Should it sounnd like Radio
      > > Tarifa? Should there be clear Troubador influence? I just can't quite
      > > make up my mind for more than a few days at a stretch.
      >
      > Polyphonic singing with quarter tones would be pretty interesting to
      > hear. Where are the Carraxans located again?
      >
    • Roger Mills
      ... the simple answer is *here s* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria s coast, about to Oran.
      Message 2 of 27 , Jan 24, 2013
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        --- On Thu, 1/24/13, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
        the simple answer is *here's* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from
        the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria's coast, about to
        Oran.

        Adam

        On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 12:11 PM, Garth Wallace <gwalla@...> wrote:

        > On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 8:48 AM, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
        > > I haven't really made up my mind about Carraxan music either. One
        > > thing I continually debate is how much influence Arab music should
        > > have. Should Carraxan music use the quarter tones? Should it sould
        > > like Sardinian or Corsican polyphony? Should it sounnd like Radio
        > > Tarifa? Should there be clear Troubador influence? I just can't quite
        > > make up my mind for more than a few days at a stretch.
        >
        > Polyphonic singing with quarter tones would be pretty interesting to
        > hear. Where are the Carraxans located again?
        >
        ============================================

        I can certainly see some Arabic influence, but also Jewish, and what about pre-Islamic Berber/Tuareg music? and Greek Orthodox? and of course Roman Catholic~European. Maybe something like Spanish Mozarabic liturgical music, of which some has been preserved? IIRC your elite/ruling family is of European origin, no? Didn't they stem from the Vandal (Germanic) invasion of N.AFrica? Maybe too early for troubador influence, but by early Renaissance times, that could have reached Carraxa..........Do we know anything about Donatist liturgical usages? Very early I'd suspect, so probably monophonic. But "popular" music could be a mix of everything :-))) depending on much much interaction there is between the various ethnic groups.

        I don't recall your historical work exactly-- has it reached modern times yet?
      • Tim Smith
        ... Tuning theory, and just intonation in particular, is something I ve been interested in for some time, and actually know quite a bit about, as an outgrowth
        Message 3 of 27 , Jan 25, 2013
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          On 1/24/2013 11:31 AM, Jörg Rhiemeier wrote:
          > Hallo conlangers!
          >
          >
          > I am not sure yet what kind of scale Old Albic music uses, but
          > I am leaning towards some kind of just intonation. I am not
          > very versed in tuning theory, I must say. Some ideas about Old
          > Albic music can be found here:
          >
          > http://www.frathwiki.com/Old_Albic_music

          Tuning theory, and just intonation in particular, is something I've been
          interested in for some time, and actually know quite a bit about, as an
          outgrowth of my involvement in early music. I'd be happy to discuss
          this with you offlist (I suspect it's too far off-topic to be of much
          interest to most list members).

          - Tim

          >
          > --
          > ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
          > http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
          > "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
          >
        • Adam Walker
          ... Yes, but *which* Jewish musical influence? Certainly not Klezmer!! ... Most definitely...if I had the foggiest notion what Berber music sounded like in
          Message 4 of 27 , Jan 25, 2013
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            On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 1:59 PM, Roger Mills <romiltz@...> wrote:

            > --- On Thu, 1/24/13, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
            > the simple answer is *here's* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from
            > the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria's coast, about to
            > Oran.
            >
            > Adam
            >
            > On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 12:11 PM, Garth Wallace <gwalla@...> wrote:
            >
            > > On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 8:48 AM, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
            > > > I haven't really made up my mind about Carraxan music either. One
            > > > thing I continually debate is how much influence Arab music should
            > > > have. Should Carraxan music use the quarter tones? Should it sould
            > > > like Sardinian or Corsican polyphony? Should it sounnd like Radio
            > > > Tarifa? Should there be clear Troubador influence? I just can't quite
            > > > make up my mind for more than a few days at a stretch.
            > >
            > > Polyphonic singing with quarter tones would be pretty interesting to
            > > hear. Where are the Carraxans located again?
            > >
            > ============================================
            >
            > I can certainly see some Arabic influence, but also Jewish,


            Yes, but *which* Jewish musical influence? Certainly not Klezmer!!


            > and what about pre-Islamic Berber/Tuareg music?



            Most definitely...if I had the foggiest notion what Berber music sounded
            like in 500AD.


            > and Greek Orthodox?


            Yes, actually, this is one of the musics I listen to when I'm trying to
            work out in my head what Carraxan music ough to sound like, and Greek folk
            music as well.


            > and of course Roman Catholic~European. Maybe something like Spanish
            > Mozarabic liturgical music, of which some has been preserved? IIRC your
            > elite/ruling family is of European origin, no? Didn't they stem from the
            > Vandal (Germanic) invasion of N.AFrica?


            They're Norman French, actually. From the Norman Kingdom of Sicily.



            > Maybe too early for troubador influence, but by early Renaissance times,
            > that could have reached Carraxa..........


            Well, The Kingdom of Talosa is now Donatist. And there has been some
            intermarrying of the ruling houses.



            > Do we know anything about Donatist liturgical usages? Very early I'd
            > suspect, so probably monophonic.



            In the real world, I don't think we know anything, but in my world, I'm
            assuming that it sounds very much like the Maronite and other non-Greek
            Orthodox Churches of the Middle East.


            > But "popular" music could be a mix of everything :-))) depending on much
            > much interaction there is between the various ethnic groups.
            >
            > I don't recall your historical work exactly-- has it reached modern times
            > yet?
            >

            Not yet. I'm still stuck in the 1300's.

            Adam
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