Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Conlang music (was RE: Orthography congruous to pronunciation)

Expand Messages
  • Wesley Parish
    Well, it wouldn t be inconceivable for me to make some of the Yhe Vala Lakha sentences into a song or so - mind you, if I was to make it authentic I d have
    Message 1 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Well, it wouldn't be inconceivable for me to make some of the Yhe
      Vala Lakha sentences into a song or so - mind you, if I was to make
      it "authentic" I'd have to include an end-blown flute of some
      description, and some percussion - not animal-skin percussion aka
      drums, because Lakhabrech tend to eat that long before they consider
      its musical possibilities; they use wood or stone.

      Wesley Parish

      On 23/01/2013, at 1:05 PM, Mathieu Roy wrote:

      > Tim wrote:
      > <<This is something I regularly deal with as a singer of early
      > music; when
      > my group sings a Latin motet or mass, we try to at least
      > approximate the
      > pronunciation that would have been used in the time and place where
      > it was
      > composed.>>
      >
      > I was going to eventually ask you for conlang music; I think this
      > is a good
      > opportunity.
      >
      > (Tim) even if your music isn't in a conlang, I would also be
      > interested to
      > hear some if you have something on the web, because I think it's a
      > nice idea
      > to sing in ancient languages. :)
      >
      > So I would be interested to know what are your favorite and the
      > most popular
      > conlang songs.
      >
      > For those interested, I've started to build a Youtube playlist that
      > you can
      > access here:
      > http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL6Iy2E-
      > Y52stsLyT9SQqT5gZfm891jNM, so
      > if you have a youtube link for your recommended song that would be
      > even
      > nicer :)
      >
      > Right now I've only put the Lojban and Esperanto anthem, and
      > another song in
      > Esperanto on the playlist.
      >
      > -Mathieu
    • Jörg Rhiemeier
      Hallo conlangers! ... There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics are all in a conlang named Kobaian. Myself, I haven t written songs in
      Message 2 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Hallo conlangers!

        On Wednesday 23 January 2013 01:05:32 Mathieu Roy wrote:

        > Tim wrote:
        > <<This is something I regularly deal with as a singer of early music; when
        > my group sings a Latin motet or mass, we try to at least approximate the
        > pronunciation that would have been used in the time and place where it was
        > composed.>>
        >
        > I was going to eventually ask you for conlang music; I think this is a good
        > opportunity.

        There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics
        are all in a conlang named Kobaian.

        Myself, I haven't written songs in Old Albic (or any other conlang)
        yet, but I intend to do so.

        --
        ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
        http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
        "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
      • Adam Walker
        Oh, and Sigur Ros with their songs in Hoplanska. Adam
        Message 3 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Oh, and Sigur Ros with their songs in Hoplanska.

          Adam

          On 1/23/13, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...> wrote:
          > Hallo conlangers!
          >
          > On Wednesday 23 January 2013 01:05:32 Mathieu Roy wrote:
          >
          >> Tim wrote:
          >> <<This is something I regularly deal with as a singer of early music;
          >> when
          >> my group sings a Latin motet or mass, we try to at least approximate the
          >> pronunciation that would have been used in the time and place where it
          >> was
          >> composed.>>
          >>
          >> I was going to eventually ask you for conlang music; I think this is a
          >> good
          >> opportunity.
          >
          > There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics
          > are all in a conlang named Kobaian.
          >
          > Myself, I haven't written songs in Old Albic (or any other conlang)
          > yet, but I intend to do so.
          >
          > --
          > ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
          > http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
          > "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
          >
        • Sam Stutter
          I don t believe that s an actual language, but rather what Jònsi and the guys call their meaningless collection of English and Icelandic sounds which they use
          Message 4 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            I don't believe that's an actual language, but rather what Jònsi and the guys call their meaningless collection of English and Icelandic sounds which they use when they can't think of lyrics. AFAIK.

            Lisa Gerrard also has what she calls a language which she uses from time to time, although I can't say whether it is actually a true language, a cypher of English or just nonsense words.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TsKV5P8JDi0 (The Lost Star of Menelik - conlang or not, who knows?)

            On 23 Jan 2013, at 16:10, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:

            > Oh, and Sigur Ros with their songs in Hoplanska.
            >
            > Adam
            >
            > On 1/23/13, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...> wrote:
            >> Hallo conlangers!
            >>
            >> On Wednesday 23 January 2013 01:05:32 Mathieu Roy wrote:
            >>
            >>> Tim wrote:
            >>> <<This is something I regularly deal with as a singer of early music;
            >>> when
            >>> my group sings a Latin motet or mass, we try to at least approximate the
            >>> pronunciation that would have been used in the time and place where it
            >>> was
            >>> composed.>>
            >>>
            >>> I was going to eventually ask you for conlang music; I think this is a
            >>> good
            >>> opportunity.
            >>
            >> There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics
            >> are all in a conlang named Kobaian.
            >>
            >> Myself, I haven't written songs in Old Albic (or any other conlang)
            >> yet, but I intend to do so.
            >>
            >> --
            >> ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
            >> http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
            >> "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
            >>
          • Roger Mills
            ... There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics are all in a conlang named Kobaian. Myself, I haven t written songs in Old Albic (or any
            Message 5 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              --- On Wed, 1/23/13, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...> wrote:
              On Wednesday 23 January 2013 01:05:32 Mathieu Roy wrote:

              > Tim wrote:
              > <<This is something I regularly deal with as a singer of early music; when
              > my group sings a Latin motet or mass, we try to at least approximate the
              > pronunciation that would have been used in the time and place where it was
              > composed.>>
              >
              > I was going to eventually ask you for conlang music; I think this is a good
              > opportunity.

              There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics
              are all in a conlang named Kobaian.

              Myself, I haven't written songs in Old Albic (or any other conlang)
              yet, but I intend to do so.
              =========================================

              Neither have I, at least not deliberately. However, the little Kash poem 'fosi tambranipan' "Sailing to Tambranipa" (you can see it at http://cinduworld.tripod.com/alphabet.htm) is supposed to be sung; it's used when saying farewell to someone whom you may not see again.

              Tranditional Kash music used a 10-tone scale, and Herman Miller was kind enough to provide a melody for this poem.  If anyone would like to hear it (and with Herman's permission) I'll post it. I've never tried to sing along with it, but since I tend to sing totally off-key anyway, it might work..........
            • Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets
              ... Japanese composer Yuki Kaijura also does this all the time, to the point that her fans call the language she uses Kaijuran . She claims it s an actual
              Message 6 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
              • 0 Attachment
                On 23 January 2013 17:35, Sam Stutter <samjjs89@...> wrote:

                > I don't believe that's an actual language, but rather what Jònsi and the
                > guys call their meaningless collection of English and Icelandic sounds
                > which they use when they can't think of lyrics. AFAIK.
                >
                > Lisa Gerrard also has what she calls a language which she uses from time
                > to time, although I can't say whether it is actually a true language, a
                > cypher of English or just nonsense words.
                >
                >
                Japanese composer Yuki Kaijura also does this all the time, to the point
                that her fans call the language she uses "Kaijuran". She claims it's an
                actual conlang mixing Japanese, English, Latin and other European
                languages, but no one knows if the claim is true or whether it's just
                nonsense words.

                An example (with lyrics): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MaQ6m6mho8
                --
                Christophe Grandsire-Koevoets.

                http://christophoronomicon.blogspot.com/
                http://www.christophoronomicon.nl/
              • Garth Wallace
                ... If you hadn t mentioned them I would have. As with many of these examples, though, whether Kobaian is really a full conlang or not is debatable. Some
                Message 7 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  On Wed, Jan 23, 2013 at 7:03 AM, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...> wrote:
                  > Hallo conlangers!
                  >
                  > On Wednesday 23 January 2013 01:05:32 Mathieu Roy wrote:
                  >
                  >> Tim wrote:
                  >> <<This is something I regularly deal with as a singer of early music; when
                  >> my group sings a Latin motet or mass, we try to at least approximate the
                  >> pronunciation that would have been used in the time and place where it was
                  >> composed.>>
                  >>
                  >> I was going to eventually ask you for conlang music; I think this is a good
                  >> opportunity.
                  >
                  > There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics
                  > are all in a conlang named Kobaian.

                  If you hadn't mentioned them I would have.

                  As with many of these examples, though, whether Kobaian is really a
                  full conlang or not is debatable. Some recurring words have had
                  meanings assigned, and their song cycles are supposed to tell stories,
                  but the lyrics are repetitive chanting that barely hint at a grammar
                  and clearly cannot be narrative. It sure sounds cool though.
                • Mathieu Roy
                  Thanks to everyone who replied. The playlist now has 15 songs with a short description of the conlang used in each of them. You can share it with people who
                  Message 8 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Thanks to everyone who replied. The playlist now has 15 songs with a short
                    description of the conlang used in each of them. You can share it with
                    people who might be interested:
                    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL6Iy2E-Y52stsLyT9SQqT5gZfm891jNM. If
                    you think of other songs that could be added to this list, please let me
                    know.

                    -Mathieu

                    -----Message d'origine-----
                    De : Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] De la
                    part de Garth Wallace
                    Envoyé : jeudi 24 janvier 2013 00:26
                    À : CONLANG@...
                    Objet : Re: Conlang music (was RE: Orthography congruous to pronunciation)

                    On Wed, Jan 23, 2013 at 7:03 AM, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...>
                    wrote:
                    > Hallo conlangers!
                    >
                    > On Wednesday 23 January 2013 01:05:32 Mathieu Roy wrote:
                    >
                    >> Tim wrote:
                    >> <<This is something I regularly deal with as a singer of early music;
                    when
                    >> my group sings a Latin motet or mass, we try to at least approximate the
                    >> pronunciation that would have been used in the time and place where it
                    was
                    >> composed.>>
                    >>
                    >> I was going to eventually ask you for conlang music; I think this is a
                    good
                    >> opportunity.
                    >
                    > There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics
                    > are all in a conlang named Kobaian.

                    If you hadn't mentioned them I would have.

                    As with many of these examples, though, whether Kobaian is really a
                    full conlang or not is debatable. Some recurring words have had
                    meanings assigned, and their song cycles are supposed to tell stories,
                    but the lyrics are repetitive chanting that barely hint at a grammar
                    and clearly cannot be narrative. It sure sounds cool though.
                  • Adam Walker
                    Ummm. That Klingon song ain t in Klingon. Adam
                    Message 9 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Ummm. That Klingon song ain't in Klingon.

                      Adam


                      On Wed, Jan 23, 2013 at 7:15 PM, Mathieu Roy <mathieu.roy.37@...>wrote:

                      > Thanks to everyone who replied. The playlist now has 15 songs with a short
                      > description of the conlang used in each of them. You can share it with
                      > people who might be interested:
                      > http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL6Iy2E-Y52stsLyT9SQqT5gZfm891jNM.
                      > If
                      > you think of other songs that could be added to this list, please let me
                      > know.
                      >
                      > -Mathieu
                      >
                      > -----Message d'origine-----
                      > De : Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] De la
                      > part de Garth Wallace
                      > Envoyé : jeudi 24 janvier 2013 00:26
                      > À : CONLANG@...
                      > Objet : Re: Conlang music (was RE: Orthography congruous to pronunciation)
                      >
                      > On Wed, Jan 23, 2013 at 7:03 AM, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...>
                      > wrote:
                      > > Hallo conlangers!
                      > >
                      > > On Wednesday 23 January 2013 01:05:32 Mathieu Roy wrote:
                      > >
                      > >> Tim wrote:
                      > >> <<This is something I regularly deal with as a singer of early music;
                      > when
                      > >> my group sings a Latin motet or mass, we try to at least approximate the
                      > >> pronunciation that would have been used in the time and place where it
                      > was
                      > >> composed.>>
                      > >>
                      > >> I was going to eventually ask you for conlang music; I think this is a
                      > good
                      > >> opportunity.
                      > >
                      > > There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics
                      > > are all in a conlang named Kobaian.
                      >
                      > If you hadn't mentioned them I would have.
                      >
                      > As with many of these examples, though, whether Kobaian is really a
                      > full conlang or not is debatable. Some recurring words have had
                      > meanings assigned, and their song cycles are supposed to tell stories,
                      > but the lyrics are repetitive chanting that barely hint at a grammar
                      > and clearly cannot be narrative. It sure sounds cool though.
                      >
                    • Mathieu Roy
                      My bad. I ve removed it. Thanks for noticing. In what language was it? Let me know if you see other errors. -Mathieu ... De : Constructed Languages List
                      Message 10 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        My bad. I've removed it. Thanks for noticing. In what language was it? Let
                        me know if you see other errors.

                        -Mathieu

                        -----Message d'origine-----
                        De : Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] De la
                        part de Adam Walker
                        Envoyé : jeudi 24 janvier 2013 02:37
                        À : CONLANG@...
                        Objet : Re: Conlang music (was RE: Orthography congruous to pronunciation)

                        Ummm. That Klingon song ain't in Klingon.

                        Adam


                        On Wed, Jan 23, 2013 at 7:15 PM, Mathieu Roy
                        <mathieu.roy.37@...>wrote:

                        > Thanks to everyone who replied. The playlist now has 15 songs with a
                        > short description of the conlang used in each of them. You can share
                        > it with people who might be interested:
                        > http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL6Iy2E-Y52stsLyT9SQqT5gZfm891jNM.
                        > If
                        > you think of other songs that could be added to this list, please let
                        > me know.
                        >
                        > -Mathieu
                        >
                        > -----Message d'origine-----
                        > De : Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] De
                        > la part de Garth Wallace Envoyé : jeudi 24 janvier 2013 00:26 À :
                        > CONLANG@... Objet : Re: Conlang music (was RE:
                        > Orthography congruous to pronunciation)
                        >
                        > On Wed, Jan 23, 2013 at 7:03 AM, Jörg Rhiemeier
                        > <joerg_rhiemeier@...>
                        > wrote:
                        > > Hallo conlangers!
                        > >
                        > > On Wednesday 23 January 2013 01:05:32 Mathieu Roy wrote:
                        > >
                        > >> Tim wrote:
                        > >> <<This is something I regularly deal with as a singer of early
                        > >> music;
                        > when
                        > >> my group sings a Latin motet or mass, we try to at least
                        > >> approximate the pronunciation that would have been used in the time
                        > >> and place where it
                        > was
                        > >> composed.>>
                        > >>
                        > >> I was going to eventually ask you for conlang music; I think this
                        > >> is a
                        > good
                        > >> opportunity.
                        > >
                        > > There is a French avant-garde rock band named Magma whose lyrics are
                        > > all in a conlang named Kobaian.
                        >
                        > If you hadn't mentioned them I would have.
                        >
                        > As with many of these examples, though, whether Kobaian is really a
                        > full conlang or not is debatable. Some recurring words have had
                        > meanings assigned, and their song cycles are supposed to tell stories,
                        > but the lyrics are repetitive chanting that barely hint at a grammar
                        > and clearly cannot be narrative. It sure sounds cool though.
                        >
                      • Herman Miller
                        ... I ve got a copy here (preceded by a sample of the 10-tone scale) https://sites.google.com/site/teamouse/fosi-tambranipan.mp3?attredirects=0 There s also a
                        Message 11 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
                        • 0 Attachment
                          On 1/23/2013 12:20 PM, Roger Mills wrote:

                          > Tranditional Kash music used a 10-tone scale, and Herman Miller was
                          > kind enough to provide a melody for this poem. If anyone would like
                          > to hear it (and with Herman's permission) I'll post it. I've never
                          > tried to sing along with it, but since I tend to sing totally off-key
                          > anyway, it might work..........

                          I've got a copy here (preceded by a sample of the 10-tone scale)

                          https://sites.google.com/site/teamouse/fosi-tambranipan.mp3?attredirects=0

                          There's also a melody for my Jarda translation of Irina Rempt's
                          "Starling Song" (Fü Margarêl)

                          https://sites.google.com/site/teamouse/starling.mp3?attredirects=0

                          If anyone out there still has a Real Audio player after all these years,
                          there's a recording of me singing the melody.

                          http://www.prismnet.com/~hmiller/ra/fue-marrgarrel-sung.ra
                        • Alex Fink
                          ... Teonaht was already mentioned but not, apparently, the crucial fact that some of it is on Youtube. One such is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XZlF-D4Ay4
                          Message 12 of 27 , Jan 23, 2013
                          • 0 Attachment
                            On Thu, 24 Jan 2013 02:15:13 +0100, Mathieu Roy <mathieu.roy.37@...> wrote:

                            >Thanks to everyone who replied. The playlist now has 15 songs with a short
                            >description of the conlang used in each of them. You can share it with
                            >people who might be interested:
                            >http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL6Iy2E-Y52stsLyT9SQqT5gZfm891jNM. If
                            >you think of other songs that could be added to this list, please let me
                            >know.

                            Teonaht was already mentioned but not, apparently, the crucial fact that some of it is on Youtube. One such is
                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XZlF-D4Ay4
                            I don't know if there are others, but if you're sufficiently diligent to dig through textcavation's uploads you may find something else there.

                            Oh, oh, Aren Wood has some Sandic stuff on Youtube too.
                            http://www.youtube.com/user/bornforwater

                            Alex
                          • Andrej Šuc
                            You can include another song by Yuki Kajiura, it s my personal favourite: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX605mM-f74 the video includes the lyrics and
                            Message 13 of 27 , Jan 24, 2013
                            • 0 Attachment
                              You can include another song by Yuki Kajiura, it's my personal favourite:
                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MX605mM-f74 the video includes the lyrics
                              and translation in English (I'm not sure if the translation is an official
                              one or not but it fits, I guess).

                              Also, don't forget the two and a half conlang songs that were in the
                              Eurovision Song Contest:
                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hDcpAc6Qm3Y (Belgium, 2003)
                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLVj4bqEe6I (The Nederlands, 2006, partially
                              also in English)
                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qbbajVZ4uOo (Belgium, 2008)


                              I can also contribute something more personal. A few years ago I translated
                              ABBA's s"I Have a Dream" into my conlang Laefèvæšii, as it was called back
                              then: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=REIx5_tEJWk I no longer use that
                              version of the language, it has changed quite a lot since then (and it's
                              now also called Ascended/Celestial Laefêvëši). Oh, and to avoid any
                              confusion, it's not me who sang the song, I'm absolutely terrible at
                              singing, so I found someone else to sing it for me. :)

                              Cheers,
                              Andrej



                              2013/1/24 Alex Fink <000024@...>

                              > On Thu, 24 Jan 2013 02:15:13 +0100, Mathieu Roy <mathieu.roy.37@...>
                              > wrote:
                              >
                              > >Thanks to everyone who replied. The playlist now has 15 songs with a short
                              > >description of the conlang used in each of them. You can share it with
                              > >people who might be interested:
                              > >http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLL6Iy2E-Y52stsLyT9SQqT5gZfm891jNM.
                              > If
                              > >you think of other songs that could be added to this list, please let me
                              > >know.
                              >
                              > Teonaht was already mentioned but not, apparently, the crucial fact that
                              > some of it is on Youtube. One such is
                              > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XZlF-D4Ay4
                              > I don't know if there are others, but if you're sufficiently diligent to
                              > dig through textcavation's uploads you may find something else there.
                              >
                              > Oh, oh, Aren Wood has some Sandic stuff on Youtube too.
                              > http://www.youtube.com/user/bornforwater
                              >
                              > Alex
                              >



                              --
                              The future is predetermined by the character of those who shape it.
                              Prihodnost vnaprej določajo karakterji tistih, ki jo oblikujejo.
                            • David McCann
                              On Wed, 23 Jan 2013 22:31:44 -0500 ... I m proud to say that my Linux media player rendered it perfectly! I can t quite decide whether it sounds Turkish or
                              Message 14 of 27 , Jan 24, 2013
                              • 0 Attachment
                                On Wed, 23 Jan 2013 22:31:44 -0500
                                Herman Miller <hmiller@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > There's also a melody for my Jarda translation of Irina Rempt's
                                > "Starling Song" (Fü Margarêl)
                                > If anyone out there still has a Real Audio player after all these
                                > years, there's a recording of me singing the melody.

                                I'm proud to say that my Linux media player rendered it perfectly! I
                                can't quite decide whether it sounds Turkish or Japanese, but I'm no
                                musician; nice, though.
                              • Jörg Rhiemeier
                                Hallo conlangers! ... I am not sure yet what kind of scale Old Albic music uses, but I am leaning towards some kind of just intonation. I am not very versed
                                Message 15 of 27 , Jan 24, 2013
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Hallo conlangers!

                                  On Wednesday 23 January 2013 18:20:00 Roger Mills wrote:

                                  > Tranditional Kash music used a 10-tone scale, and Herman Miller was kind
                                  > enough to provide a melody for this poem. If anyone would like to hear it
                                  > (and with Herman's permission) I'll post it. I've never tried to sing
                                  > along with it, but since I tend to sing totally off-key anyway, it might
                                  > work..........

                                  I am not sure yet what kind of scale Old Albic music uses, but
                                  I am leaning towards some kind of just intonation. I am not
                                  very versed in tuning theory, I must say. Some ideas about Old
                                  Albic music can be found here:

                                  http://www.frathwiki.com/Old_Albic_music

                                  --
                                  ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
                                  http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
                                  "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
                                • Adam Walker
                                  I haven t really made up my mind about Carraxan music either. One thing I continually debate is how much influence Arab music should have. Should Carraxan
                                  Message 16 of 27 , Jan 24, 2013
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    I haven't really made up my mind about Carraxan music either. One
                                    thing I continually debate is how much influence Arab music should
                                    have. Should Carraxan music use the quarter tones? Should it sould
                                    like Sardinian or Corsican polyphony? Should it sounnd like Radio
                                    Tarifa? Should there be clear Troubador influence? I just can't quite
                                    make up my mind for more than a few days at a stretch.

                                    Adam

                                    On 1/24/13, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...> wrote:
                                    > Hallo conlangers!
                                    >
                                    > On Wednesday 23 January 2013 18:20:00 Roger Mills wrote:
                                    >
                                    >> Tranditional Kash music used a 10-tone scale, and Herman Miller was kind
                                    >> enough to provide a melody for this poem. If anyone would like to hear
                                    >> it
                                    >> (and with Herman's permission) I'll post it. I've never tried to sing
                                    >> along with it, but since I tend to sing totally off-key anyway, it might
                                    >> work..........
                                    >
                                    > I am not sure yet what kind of scale Old Albic music uses, but
                                    > I am leaning towards some kind of just intonation. I am not
                                    > very versed in tuning theory, I must say. Some ideas about Old
                                    > Albic music can be found here:
                                    >
                                    > http://www.frathwiki.com/Old_Albic_music
                                    >
                                    > --
                                    > ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
                                    > http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
                                    > "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
                                    >
                                  • Garth Wallace
                                    ... Polyphonic singing with quarter tones would be pretty interesting to hear. Where are the Carraxans located again?
                                    Message 17 of 27 , Jan 24, 2013
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 8:48 AM, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                                      > I haven't really made up my mind about Carraxan music either. One
                                      > thing I continually debate is how much influence Arab music should
                                      > have. Should Carraxan music use the quarter tones? Should it sould
                                      > like Sardinian or Corsican polyphony? Should it sounnd like Radio
                                      > Tarifa? Should there be clear Troubador influence? I just can't quite
                                      > make up my mind for more than a few days at a stretch.

                                      Polyphonic singing with quarter tones would be pretty interesting to
                                      hear. Where are the Carraxans located again?
                                    • Adam Walker
                                      the simple answer is *here s* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria s coast, about to Oran. Adam
                                      Message 18 of 27 , Jan 24, 2013
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        the simple answer is *here's* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from
                                        the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria's coast, about to
                                        Oran.

                                        Adam

                                        On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 12:11 PM, Garth Wallace <gwalla@...> wrote:

                                        > On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 8:48 AM, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                                        > > I haven't really made up my mind about Carraxan music either. One
                                        > > thing I continually debate is how much influence Arab music should
                                        > > have. Should Carraxan music use the quarter tones? Should it sould
                                        > > like Sardinian or Corsican polyphony? Should it sounnd like Radio
                                        > > Tarifa? Should there be clear Troubador influence? I just can't quite
                                        > > make up my mind for more than a few days at a stretch.
                                        >
                                        > Polyphonic singing with quarter tones would be pretty interesting to
                                        > hear. Where are the Carraxans located again?
                                        >
                                      • Roger Mills
                                        ... the simple answer is *here s* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria s coast, about to Oran.
                                        Message 19 of 27 , Jan 24, 2013
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          --- On Thu, 1/24/13, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                                          the simple answer is *here's* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from
                                          the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria's coast, about to
                                          Oran.

                                          Adam

                                          On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 12:11 PM, Garth Wallace <gwalla@...> wrote:

                                          > On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 8:48 AM, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                                          > > I haven't really made up my mind about Carraxan music either. One
                                          > > thing I continually debate is how much influence Arab music should
                                          > > have. Should Carraxan music use the quarter tones? Should it sould
                                          > > like Sardinian or Corsican polyphony? Should it sounnd like Radio
                                          > > Tarifa? Should there be clear Troubador influence? I just can't quite
                                          > > make up my mind for more than a few days at a stretch.
                                          >
                                          > Polyphonic singing with quarter tones would be pretty interesting to
                                          > hear. Where are the Carraxans located again?
                                          >
                                          ============================================

                                          I can certainly see some Arabic influence, but also Jewish, and what about pre-Islamic Berber/Tuareg music? and Greek Orthodox? and of course Roman Catholic~European. Maybe something like Spanish Mozarabic liturgical music, of which some has been preserved? IIRC your elite/ruling family is of European origin, no? Didn't they stem from the Vandal (Germanic) invasion of N.AFrica? Maybe too early for troubador influence, but by early Renaissance times, that could have reached Carraxa..........Do we know anything about Donatist liturgical usages? Very early I'd suspect, so probably monophonic. But "popular" music could be a mix of everything :-))) depending on much much interaction there is between the various ethnic groups.

                                          I don't recall your historical work exactly-- has it reached modern times yet?
                                        • Tim Smith
                                          ... Tuning theory, and just intonation in particular, is something I ve been interested in for some time, and actually know quite a bit about, as an outgrowth
                                          Message 20 of 27 , Jan 25, 2013
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            On 1/24/2013 11:31 AM, Jörg Rhiemeier wrote:
                                            > Hallo conlangers!
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > I am not sure yet what kind of scale Old Albic music uses, but
                                            > I am leaning towards some kind of just intonation. I am not
                                            > very versed in tuning theory, I must say. Some ideas about Old
                                            > Albic music can be found here:
                                            >
                                            > http://www.frathwiki.com/Old_Albic_music

                                            Tuning theory, and just intonation in particular, is something I've been
                                            interested in for some time, and actually know quite a bit about, as an
                                            outgrowth of my involvement in early music. I'd be happy to discuss
                                            this with you offlist (I suspect it's too far off-topic to be of much
                                            interest to most list members).

                                            - Tim

                                            >
                                            > --
                                            > ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
                                            > http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
                                            > "Bêsel asa Éam, a Éam atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Éamal." - SiM 1:1
                                            >
                                          • Adam Walker
                                            ... Yes, but *which* Jewish musical influence? Certainly not Klezmer!! ... Most definitely...if I had the foggiest notion what Berber music sounded like in
                                            Message 21 of 27 , Jan 25, 2013
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 1:59 PM, Roger Mills <romiltz@...> wrote:

                                              > --- On Thu, 1/24/13, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                                              > the simple answer is *here's* Tunisia, but their territory stretches from
                                              > the western bit of Libya to the easter 2/3 of Algeria's coast, about to
                                              > Oran.
                                              >
                                              > Adam
                                              >
                                              > On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 12:11 PM, Garth Wallace <gwalla@...> wrote:
                                              >
                                              > > On Thu, Jan 24, 2013 at 8:48 AM, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
                                              > > > I haven't really made up my mind about Carraxan music either. One
                                              > > > thing I continually debate is how much influence Arab music should
                                              > > > have. Should Carraxan music use the quarter tones? Should it sould
                                              > > > like Sardinian or Corsican polyphony? Should it sounnd like Radio
                                              > > > Tarifa? Should there be clear Troubador influence? I just can't quite
                                              > > > make up my mind for more than a few days at a stretch.
                                              > >
                                              > > Polyphonic singing with quarter tones would be pretty interesting to
                                              > > hear. Where are the Carraxans located again?
                                              > >
                                              > ============================================
                                              >
                                              > I can certainly see some Arabic influence, but also Jewish,


                                              Yes, but *which* Jewish musical influence? Certainly not Klezmer!!


                                              > and what about pre-Islamic Berber/Tuareg music?



                                              Most definitely...if I had the foggiest notion what Berber music sounded
                                              like in 500AD.


                                              > and Greek Orthodox?


                                              Yes, actually, this is one of the musics I listen to when I'm trying to
                                              work out in my head what Carraxan music ough to sound like, and Greek folk
                                              music as well.


                                              > and of course Roman Catholic~European. Maybe something like Spanish
                                              > Mozarabic liturgical music, of which some has been preserved? IIRC your
                                              > elite/ruling family is of European origin, no? Didn't they stem from the
                                              > Vandal (Germanic) invasion of N.AFrica?


                                              They're Norman French, actually. From the Norman Kingdom of Sicily.



                                              > Maybe too early for troubador influence, but by early Renaissance times,
                                              > that could have reached Carraxa..........


                                              Well, The Kingdom of Talosa is now Donatist. And there has been some
                                              intermarrying of the ruling houses.



                                              > Do we know anything about Donatist liturgical usages? Very early I'd
                                              > suspect, so probably monophonic.



                                              In the real world, I don't think we know anything, but in my world, I'm
                                              assuming that it sounds very much like the Maronite and other non-Greek
                                              Orthodox Churches of the Middle East.


                                              > But "popular" music could be a mix of everything :-))) depending on much
                                              > much interaction there is between the various ethnic groups.
                                              >
                                              > I don't recall your historical work exactly-- has it reached modern times
                                              > yet?
                                              >

                                              Not yet. I'm still stuck in the 1300's.

                                              Adam
                                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.