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Re: Loglan[g] VS Natlang

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  • Leonardo Castro
    ... Maybe we should make a distinction between regularity and unambiguity. BTW, I think that I have already heard someone saying that there is an advantage of
    Message 1 of 36 , Jan 18, 2013
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      2013/1/18 Jim Henry <jimhenry1973@...>:
      > On Fri, Jan 18, 2013 at 6:27 AM, Mathieu Roy <mathieu.roy.37@...> wrote:
      >> What are the advantages of speaking a less logical language (a language with grammar rules with a lot of exceptions, a lot of words with ambiguity, etc.)?
      >
      > [*] -- Esperanto isn't a loglang or engelang in the strict sense, nor
      > is it perfectly unambiguous, but I'd say it's less ambiguous than the
      > natlangs I'm most familiar with in both syntax and lexicon.

      Maybe we should make a distinction between regularity and unambiguity.

      BTW, I think that I have already heard someone saying that there is an
      advantage of irregular verbal forms as they become more audibly
      distinguishable from each other.

      For instance, each one of the Spanish expressions
      "yo soy, tú eres, usted es, nosotros somos, vosotros sois, ustedes son"
      are better distinguished from each other than
      "yo es, tú es, usted es, nosotros es, vosotros es, ustedes es".

      But I doubt it's a great advantage since many languages work perfectly
      well with no person conjugation. Besides, some languages tend to omit
      the pronouns as they are implicit in the conjugations, what sometimes
      make distinguishability harder again. For instance, in "soy, eres, es,
      somos, sois, son", the words "soy", "somos", "sois" and "son" sound
      similar and could again be interpreted as a regular verb "so-" with
      pronouns postponed:

      soy = so-y = {to be} + {I}
      somos = so-mos = {to be} + {we}
      sois = so-is = {to be} + {you plural}
      son = so-n = {to be} + {they}

      I wonder if verb person conjugation originated from incorporation of
      ancient pronouns...



      > Wordplay
      > in Esperanto works in at least two ways: using words that sound
      > similar to other words (this method is also available in most
      > engelangs, I reckon), and words which are phonologically identical to
      > other words but have a different parse (this is unavailable in
      > engelangs with self-segregating morphology, which I think is most of
      > them).
      >
      > --
      > Jim Henry
      > http://www.pobox.com/~jimhenry/
      > http://www.jimhenrymedicaltrust.org
    • Leonardo Castro
      ... Singing is a more controlled situation than normal conversation. Singers knows the words they ll sing previously, so they can have a better control over
      Message 36 of 36 , Jan 25, 2013
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        2013/1/24 Adam Walker <carraxan@...>:
        > I once knew a Russian guy named Vladik. He was a music major, an
        > excellent pianist. He cloud put on the most convincing New York
        > accent, sounded like he was born in the Bronx! But when he was just
        > speaking, he had the "typical" Russian accent with odd vowels and
        > unneeded palatalizations and overly aspirated consonants. I never
        > quite understood that.
        >
        > Adam

        Singing is a more controlled situation than normal conversation.
        Singers knows the words they'll sing previously, so they can have a
        better control over their accents. It's also interesting that many
        stutterers don't stutter while singing.

        Singers usually mimic characters and other singers' voices and nuances
        very well, but this ability is not always the same in normal speech. I
        could imitate Louis Armstrong singing "What I wonderful world" but I
        could not imitate his voice while discussing Quantum Physics in
        English.
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