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"Hypmotize" Was: Consonant clusters

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  • Charles W Brickner
    It seems to me that that wouldn t be a problem if folks would learn to change the subject heading if they want to address a secondary topic in the subject
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 30, 2012
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      It seems to me that that wouldn't be a problem if folks would learn to
      change the subject heading if they want to address a secondary topic in the
      subject without addressing the subject itself.
      Charlie

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On
      Behalf Of Adam Walker
      Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2012 11:49 PM
      To: CONLANG@...
      Subject: Re: Consonant clusters

      I feel sorry for you, Patrick. The tiniest throw away comment can spawn
      YAEPT. Unfortunately, once that happens, the thread is practically
      irredeemable. Your original question is almost sure to be ignored while the
      thread grows to gargantuan proportions.

      Adam who has been there

      On 12/29/12, Patrick Dunn <pwdunn@...> wrote:
      > The pronunciation of "hypnotize" is entirely secondary to the original
      > question, and I regret using it as an example.
      >
      >
      > On Sat, Dec 29, 2012 at 9:36 PM, Gary Shannon <fiziwig@...> wrote:
      >
      >> I agree. I've never heard "hypmotize". To my ears it sounds like
      >> something a child would say, like "pusgetti" for "spaghetti". Cute,
      >> coming from a kid, but very wrong.
      >>
      >> (FWIW: Learn to speak in Western Michigan, grew up in Los Angeles,
      >> Lived in rural Oregon for the last 35 years or so.)
      >>
      >> --gary
      >>
      >> On Sat, Dec 29, 2012 at 3:56 PM, Larry Sulky <larrysulky@...>
      >> wrote:
      >> > English assimilates /n/ to [m] in "hypnotize"? News to me. Been
      >> > speaking American English since learning to speak and I've never
      >> > done that and
      >> never
      >> > heard anybody do that.
      >> >
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Second Person, a chapbook of poetry by Patrick Dunn, is now available
      > for order from Finishing Line
      > Press<http://www.finishinglinepress.com/NewReleasesandForthcomingTitle
      > s.htm>
      > and
      >
      Amazon<http://www.amazon.com/Second-Person-Patrick-Dunn/dp/1599249065/ref=sr
      _1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1324342341&sr=8-2>.
      >
    • Mathieu Roy
      Thanks Charlie, now I don t feel bad to respond ^^ In (Quebec) French, some people replace the p with an m ( hymnotiser instead of hypnotiser ). -Mat ...
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 30, 2012
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        Thanks Charlie, now I don't feel bad to respond ^^
        In (Quebec) French, some people replace the 'p' with an 'm' ("hymnotiser"
        instead of "hypnotiser").

        -Mat

        -----Message d'origine-----
        De : Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] De la
        part de Charles W Brickner
        Envoyé : dimanche 30 décembre 2012 13:07
        À : CONLANG@...
        Objet : "Hypmotize" Was: Consonant clusters

        It seems to me that that wouldn't be a problem if folks would learn to
        change the subject heading if they want to address a secondary topic in the
        subject without addressing the subject itself.
        Charlie

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On
        Behalf Of Adam Walker
        Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2012 11:49 PM
        To: CONLANG@...
        Subject: Re: Consonant clusters

        I feel sorry for you, Patrick. The tiniest throw away comment can spawn
        YAEPT. Unfortunately, once that happens, the thread is practically
        irredeemable. Your original question is almost sure to be ignored while the
        thread grows to gargantuan proportions.

        Adam who has been there

        On 12/29/12, Patrick Dunn <pwdunn@...> wrote:
        > The pronunciation of "hypnotize" is entirely secondary to the original
        > question, and I regret using it as an example.
        >
        >
        > On Sat, Dec 29, 2012 at 9:36 PM, Gary Shannon <fiziwig@...> wrote:
        >
        >> I agree. I've never heard "hypmotize". To my ears it sounds like
        >> something a child would say, like "pusgetti" for "spaghetti". Cute,
        >> coming from a kid, but very wrong.
        >>
        >> (FWIW: Learn to speak in Western Michigan, grew up in Los Angeles,
        >> Lived in rural Oregon for the last 35 years or so.)
        >>
        >> --gary
        >>
        >> On Sat, Dec 29, 2012 at 3:56 PM, Larry Sulky <larrysulky@...>
        >> wrote:
        >> > English assimilates /n/ to [m] in "hypnotize"? News to me. Been
        >> > speaking American English since learning to speak and I've never
        >> > done that and
        >> never
        >> > heard anybody do that.
        >> >
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        > --
        > Second Person, a chapbook of poetry by Patrick Dunn, is now available
        > for order from Finishing Line
        > Press<http://www.finishinglinepress.com/NewReleasesandForthcomingTitle
        > s.htm>
        > and
        >
        Amazon<http://www.amazon.com/Second-Person-Patrick-Dunn/dp/1599249065/ref=sr
        _1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1324342341&sr=8-2>.
        >
      • Adam Walker
        Hymnotiser ? Oh dear! I would expect *that* to have something to do with the singing of sacred songs! Adam
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 30, 2012
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          "Hymnotiser"? Oh dear! I would expect *that* to have something to do
          with the singing of sacred songs!

          Adam

          On 12/30/12, Mathieu Roy <mathieu.roy.37@...> wrote:
          > Thanks Charlie, now I don't feel bad to respond ^^
          > In (Quebec) French, some people replace the 'p' with an 'm' ("hymnotiser"
          > instead of "hypnotiser").
          >
          > -Mat
          >
          > -----Message d'origine-----
          > De : Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] De la
          > part de Charles W Brickner
          > Envoyé : dimanche 30 décembre 2012 13:07
          > À : CONLANG@...
          > Objet : "Hypmotize" Was: Consonant clusters
          >
          > It seems to me that that wouldn't be a problem if folks would learn to
          > change the subject heading if they want to address a secondary topic in the
          > subject without addressing the subject itself.
          > Charlie
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] On
          > Behalf Of Adam Walker
          > Sent: Saturday, December 29, 2012 11:49 PM
          > To: CONLANG@...
          > Subject: Re: Consonant clusters
          >
          > I feel sorry for you, Patrick. The tiniest throw away comment can spawn
          > YAEPT. Unfortunately, once that happens, the thread is practically
          > irredeemable. Your original question is almost sure to be ignored while the
          > thread grows to gargantuan proportions.
          >
          > Adam who has been there
          >
          > On 12/29/12, Patrick Dunn <pwdunn@...> wrote:
          >> The pronunciation of "hypnotize" is entirely secondary to the original
          >> question, and I regret using it as an example.
          >>
          >>
          >> On Sat, Dec 29, 2012 at 9:36 PM, Gary Shannon <fiziwig@...> wrote:
          >>
          >>> I agree. I've never heard "hypmotize". To my ears it sounds like
          >>> something a child would say, like "pusgetti" for "spaghetti". Cute,
          >>> coming from a kid, but very wrong.
          >>>
          >>> (FWIW: Learn to speak in Western Michigan, grew up in Los Angeles,
          >>> Lived in rural Oregon for the last 35 years or so.)
          >>>
          >>> --gary
          >>>
          >>> On Sat, Dec 29, 2012 at 3:56 PM, Larry Sulky <larrysulky@...>
          >>> wrote:
          >>> > English assimilates /n/ to [m] in "hypnotize"? News to me. Been
          >>> > speaking American English since learning to speak and I've never
          >>> > done that and
          >>> never
          >>> > heard anybody do that.
          >>> >
          >>>
          >>
          >>
          >>
          >> --
          >> Second Person, a chapbook of poetry by Patrick Dunn, is now available
          >> for order from Finishing Line
          >> Press<http://www.finishinglinepress.com/NewReleasesandForthcomingTitle
          >> s.htm>
          >> and
          >>
          > Amazon<http://www.amazon.com/Second-Person-Patrick-Dunn/dp/1599249065/ref=sr
          > _1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1324342341&sr=8-2>.
          >>
          >
        • Eric Christopherson
          ... Does the first vowel get nasalized then?
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 30, 2012
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            On Dec 30, 2012, at 6:14 AM, Mathieu Roy wrote:

            > Thanks Charlie, now I don't feel bad to respond ^^
            > In (Quebec) French, some people replace the 'p' with an 'm' ("hymnotiser"
            > instead of "hypnotiser").

            Does the first vowel get nasalized then?

            >
            > -Mat
          • Patrick Dunn
            On Sun, Dec 30, 2012 at 6:07 AM, Charles W Brickner
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 30, 2012
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              On Sun, Dec 30, 2012 at 6:07 AM, Charles W Brickner <
              tepeyachill@...> wrote:

              > It seems to me that that wouldn't be a problem if folks would learn to
              > change the subject heading if they want to address a secondary topic in the
              > subject without addressing the subject itself.
              > Charlie
              >
              >
              A very good and helpful suggestion.


              --
              Second Person, a chapbook of poetry by Patrick Dunn, is now available for
              order from Finishing Line
              Press<http://www.finishinglinepress.com/NewReleasesandForthcomingTitles.htm>
              and
              Amazon<http://www.amazon.com/Second-Person-Patrick-Dunn/dp/1599249065/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1324342341&sr=8-2>.
            • Mathieu Roy
              No. ... De : Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@LISTSERV.BROWN.EDU] De la part de Eric Christopherson Envoyé : dimanche 30 décembre 2012 16:43
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 30, 2012
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                No.

                -----Message d'origine-----
                De : Constructed Languages List [mailto:CONLANG@...] De la
                part de Eric Christopherson
                Envoyé : dimanche 30 décembre 2012 16:43
                À : CONLANG@...
                Objet : Re: "Hypmotize" Was: Consonant clusters

                On Dec 30, 2012, at 6:14 AM, Mathieu Roy wrote:

                > Thanks Charlie, now I don't feel bad to respond ^^ In (Quebec) French,
                > some people replace the 'p' with an 'm' ("hymnotiser"
                > instead of "hypnotiser").

                Does the first vowel get nasalized then?

                >
                > -Mat
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