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NaNoWriMo/Prep for Relay

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  • Anthony Miles
    It s NaNoWriMo, so I wanted to write something, but I needed to boost my Siye vocabulary before Relay 20, so I ve been composing a story in Siye on my phone.
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2012
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      It's NaNoWriMo, so I wanted to write something, but I needed to boost my Siye vocabulary before Relay 20, so I've been composing a story in Siye on my phone. The word count is low, but now I do have words or phrases for "spaceport", "walk unsteadily", "missionary", "I have oxygen-deprivation", and "written report" (which is a place, rather than a thing).
    • neo gu
      ... How is written report a place?
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2012
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        On Thu, 1 Nov 2012 21:13:43 -0400, Anthony Miles <mamercus88@...> wrote:

        > It's NaNoWriMo, so I wanted to write something, but I needed to boost my Siye
        > vocabulary before Relay 20, so I've been composing a story in Siye on my phone.
        > The word count is low, but now I do have words or phrases for "spaceport",
        > "walk unsteadily", "missionary", "I have oxygen-deprivation", and "written report"
        > (which is a place, rather than a thing).

        How is "written report" a place?
      • Anthony Miles
        A verbal report in Siye is yenaki , that which has been said. The final syllable ki is the passive suffix. yenakim is a product of a scriptorium, a
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 2, 2012
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          A "verbal report" in Siye is "yenaki", "that which has been said." The final syllable "ki" is the passive suffix. "yenakim" is "a product of a scriptorium, a place where one writes as a business". "scriptorium" is one meaning of "simakim", along with "territory where Siye is spoken". Since one of the functions of a scriptorium is to prudce reports, "yenakim" came to mean "written report".

          Another explanation is that a written report is a physical item and therefore can assume a location independent of the author or messenger, unlike a verbal report. The Siyamkam view a commercial transaction (and therefore a prototypical transaction) as the transfer a physical object from one person to the next. That's not so different from delivering a letter. If the subject of the sentence is selling the item,
          1. the seller is in the nominative or ergative case depending on whether the seller is referred to by a pronoun or proper name,
          2. the buyer is in the dative case since the distinction between the dative and allative cases is strictly animacy
          3. the item in question is in the accusative or absolutive case depending on whether the seller is referred to by a pronoun or proper name.
          4. the price (visualized as actual coins) is in the locative case.
          Since the primary expense of the report is the material on which it is composed (the pre-contact Simayamka were Iron Age technology), the content of the message is considered a thing, and the physical material on which it is written is considered a place.
        • Anthony Miles
          I did some browsing in the Universals Archive, and noted this: #1231
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 4, 2012
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            I did some browsing in the Universals Archive, and noted this:
            #1231
            http://typo.uni-konstanz.de/archive/nav/browse.php?number=1&PHPSESSID=0tjffedpn4pqrt1p79079rvfu0tfokb7
            "Diachronically, when an allative loses its local meaning (or acquires additional, non-local meanings), it will become a dative (expressing beneficiary and/or indirect object); when a locative loses its local meaning (or acquires additional, non-local meanings), it will become an accusative or ergative; when an ablative loses its local meaning (or acquires additional, non-local meaning)s, it will become a (partitive) genitive or ergative or (passive) agentive."

            So, perhaps there is a shift in some region of Simakim (the area in which Siye is spoken) from allative to dative/benefactive/indirect object. That is standard Siye. Another and more localized change is from locative to accusative, which spread to the normally locative nominalizer -kim in a few words here and there.

            UA #1231 also explains the Na'gifi Fasu'xa shift of the place suffix into the professional suffix, which is to say, locative suffix to a proto-ergative suffix.
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