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Re: Denny's wins some linguistic savvy points

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  • J. 'Mach' Wust
    ... I rather see this as a passage that backs up my argument! :) As I read it (a most interesting text), it says that the dwarves write clearly
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 31, 2012
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      On Wed, 31 Oct 2012 17:32:00 +0100, BPJ wrote:

      >On 2012-10-31 08:47, J. 'Mach' Wust wrote:
      >>> >Which by his descriptions is not too different from
      >>> >the way he says the Dwarves wrote the Common Speech
      >>> >at the end of the Third Age!
      >> The dwarves spellings that we know (the Leaves from the Book of Mazarbul)
      >> are clearly identifiable as orthographic spellings with a few Z for final
      >> S, V for final F, and whole-word abbreviations.
      >>
      >
      >I'm thinking of his *description* of Dwarwish spelling in
      >"The Peoples of Middle-earth" (HoME XII) pp. 297-299.
      >If you don't have it just tell me and I will send you
      >the excerpt offlist. The core passages for my argument are:

      I rather see this as a passage that backs up my argument! :)

      As I read it (a most interesting text), it says that the dwarves
      write clearly orthographically with but a few Z for S, and,
      admittedly, K or S for C. The use of single (or rather, fusioned)
      letters for vowel digraphs which is also mentioned does not
      affect the orthographicity of the text, since the unshifted
      vowels of traditional orthography are exactly preserved -- very
      different from the draft of one of the Leaves of the Book of
      Mazarbul which uses phonological spelling.

      ># Consequently the text was cast into English spelt as at
      ># present, but modified as it might be by writers in
      ># haste whose familiarity with the written form was
      ># imperfect, and who were also (on the first and third
      ># pages) transliterating the English into a different
      ># alphabet - one that did not for instance employ any
      ># letter in more than one distinct value, so that the
      ># distribution of English _k, c — c, s_ was reduced to
      ># _k — s_; while the use of the letters for _s_ and _z_
      ># was variable since English uses s frequently as = _z_.

      --
      grüess
      mach
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