Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Kosher

Expand Messages
  • Michael Everson
    ... Meat handladen samecome holysede jewings. Or: Food prepared according to Jewish religious law. Michael Everson * http://www.evertype.com/
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 1, 2012
      On 30 Sep 2012, at 08:06, Charlie Brickner wrote:

      > Icelandic: Matur höndlaður samkvœmt helgisiðum gyðinga
      >
      > Can anyone give us the literal meaning of these expressions?

      Meat handladen samecome holysede jewings.

      Or:

      Food prepared according to Jewish religious law.

      Michael Everson * http://www.evertype.com/
    • BPJ
      ... That s evidently not the whole story. Icelandic *does* have loanwords (other than calques) for terms like these.
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 3, 2012
        On 2012-10-01 10:27, Michael Everson wrote:
        > On 30 Sep 2012, at 08:06, Charlie Brickner wrote:
        >
        >> Icelandic: Matur höndlaður samkvœmt helgisiðum gyðinga
        >>
        >> Can anyone give us the literal meaning of these expressions?
        >
        > Meat handladen samecome holysede jewings.
        >
        > Or:
        >
        > Food prepared according to Jewish religious law.

        That's evidently not the whole story. Icelandic *does*
        have loanwords (other than calques) for terms like these.

        <http://is.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosher>

        <http://is.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halal>

        Besides I was once informed that the food on a certain
        shelf in the fridge was someone's _Gýðingamatur_, but
        you probably won't find that term in dictionaries or on WP!

        I just dicovered that there is a calque (_hljóðan_)
        although _fónem_ is by far more common.
        So much for my on-topic example...

        /Bensi með beinin
      • Eugene Oh
        Not true. It s the general word for food. 2012/9/30 Zach Wellstood
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 3, 2012
          Not true. It's the general word for food.

          2012/9/30 Zach Wellstood <zwellstood@...>

          > It's also worth mentioning that the original phrase you had for food (shi2
          > wu4) means "food" but only for animals.
          >
          > Zach
          >
          > On Sun, Sep 30, 2012 at 6:29 PM, Zach Wellstood <zwellstood@...
          > >wrote:
          >
          > > On Sun, Sep 30, 2012 at 3:06 AM, Charlie Brickner <
          > > caeruleancentaur@...> wrote:
          > >
          > >>
          > >> Mandarin: yóu tài hé fav shí wù
          > >>
          > > I think the Mandarin is inaccurate and should be: hé yóutàirén jièlǜ
          > > 合犹太人戒律 (that's what I found when I looked it up, since I haven't had a
          > > reason to learn the term for Kosher in my Chinese classes!).
          > >
          > > It literally means, "suiting Jewish people religious doctrine/tenets."
          > >
          > > --
          > > ra'aalalí 'aa! - [sirisaá! <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conlang>]
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > --
          > ra'aalalí 'aa! - [sirisaá! <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conlang>]
          >
        • Zach Wellstood
          ... I was taught shi2 pin3 for general food and shi2 wu4 for animal food. ... (shi2
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 3, 2012
            On Oct 3, 2012 6:52 PM, "Eugene Oh" <un.doing@...> wrote:
            >
            > Not true. It's the general word for food.

            I was taught shi2 pin3 for general food and shi2 wu4 for animal food.

            > 2012/9/30 Zach Wellstood <zwellstood@...>
            >
            > > It's also worth mentioning that the original phrase you had for food
            (shi2
            > > wu4) means "food" but only for animals.
            > >
            > > Zach
            > >
            > > On Sun, Sep 30, 2012 at 6:29 PM, Zach Wellstood <zwellstood@...
            > > >wrote:
            > >
            > > > On Sun, Sep 30, 2012 at 3:06 AM, Charlie Brickner <
            > > > caeruleancentaur@...> wrote:
            > > >
            > > >>
            > > >> Mandarin: yóu tài hé fav shí wù
            > > >>
            > > > I think the Mandarin is inaccurate and should be: hé yóutàirén jièlǜ
            > > > 合犹太人戒律 (that's what I found when I looked it up, since I haven't had a
            > > > reason to learn the term for Kosher in my Chinese classes!).
            > > >
            > > >
          • Douglas Koller
            ... My non-native sense is that shi2pin3 is prepared, packaged food ( pin3 having that product-y feel to it) while shi2wu4 is just a word for food . If
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 4, 2012
              > Date: Wed, 3 Oct 2012 19:10:06 -0400
              > From: zwellstood@...
              > Subject: Re: Kosher
              > To: CONLANG@...


              > > > It's also worth mentioning that the original phrase you had for food
              > (shi2
              > > > wu4) means "food" but only for animals.

              > On Oct 3, 2012 6:52 PM, "Eugene Oh" <un.doing@...> wrote:

              > > Not true. It's the general word for food.

              > I was taught shi2 pin3 for general food and shi2 wu4 for animal food.

              My non-native sense is that shi2pin3 is prepared, packaged food ("pin3" having that "product-y" feel to it) while shi2wu4 is just a word for "food". If there's anything along the essen/fressen divide, it's not springing to mind, but I'll leave that to Eugene.

              Kou
            • phil@PHILLIPDRISCOLL.COM
              ... My co-worker who was born and raised in Beijing says you are exactly correct. Shi2wu4 is any kind of food in general, but shi2pin3 is prepared food. She
              Message 6 of 16 , Oct 4, 2012
                Douglas Koller wrote:
                >

                > My non-native sense is that shi2pin3 is prepared, packaged
                > food ("pin3" having that "product-y" feel to it) while shi2wu4
                > is just a word for "food". If there's anything along the
                > essen/fressen divide, it's not springing to mind, but I'll leave
                > that to Eugene. Kou

                My co-worker who was born and raised in Beijing says you are
                exactly correct. Shi2wu4 is any kind of food in general, but
                shi2pin3 is prepared food. She says an apple and apple sauce
                are both shi2wu4, but only the apple sauce is shi2pin3.

                --Ph. D.
              • Zach Wellstood
                I wonder how I ended up misunderstanding that so much! Zach
                Message 7 of 16 , Oct 4, 2012
                  I wonder how I ended up misunderstanding that so much!

                  Zach
                  On Oct 4, 2012 10:13 AM, <phil@...> wrote:

                  > Douglas Koller wrote:
                  > >
                  >
                  > > My non-native sense is that shi2pin3 is prepared, packaged
                  > > food ("pin3" having that "product-y" feel to it) while shi2wu4
                  > > is just a word for "food". If there's anything along the
                  > > essen/fressen divide, it's not springing to mind, but I'll leave
                  > > that to Eugene. Kou
                  >
                  > My co-worker who was born and raised in Beijing says you are
                  > exactly correct. Shi2wu4 is any kind of food in general, but
                  > shi2pin3 is prepared food. She says an apple and apple sauce
                  > are both shi2wu4, but only the apple sauce is shi2pin3.
                  >
                  > --Ph. D.
                  >
                • George Corley
                  ... I should note that this jives derivationally. The pin3 品 suffix generally denotes products sold in a store.
                  Message 8 of 16 , Oct 4, 2012
                    On Thu, Oct 4, 2012 at 9:13 AM, <phil@...> wrote:

                    > Douglas Koller wrote:
                    > >
                    >
                    > > My non-native sense is that shi2pin3 is prepared, packaged
                    > > food ("pin3" having that "product-y" feel to it) while shi2wu4
                    > > is just a word for "food". If there's anything along the
                    > > essen/fressen divide, it's not springing to mind, but I'll leave
                    > > that to Eugene. Kou
                    >
                    > My co-worker who was born and raised in Beijing says you are
                    > exactly correct. Shi2wu4 is any kind of food in general, but
                    > shi2pin3 is prepared food. She says an apple and apple sauce
                    > are both shi2wu4, but only the apple sauce is shi2pin3.
                    >

                    I should note that this jives derivationally. The pin3 品 suffix generally
                    denotes products sold in a store.
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.