Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

absolute pitch

Expand Messages
  • MorphemeAddict
    Are there any languages or peoples that use or require absolute pitch? stevo
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 21, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Are there any languages or peoples that use or require absolute pitch?

      stevo
    • Jörg Rhiemeier
      Hallo conlangers! ... Natlangs? Probably not, since absolute pitch is a pretty rare ability and most people wouldn t be able to use such a language. Likewise,
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 21, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Hallo conlangers!

        On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 06:54:22 -0400 MorphemeAddict wrote:

        > Are there any languages or peoples that use or require absolute pitch?

        Natlangs? Probably not, since absolute pitch is a pretty rare
        ability and most people wouldn't be able to use such a language.

        Likewise, conlangs meant to be spoken by (ordinary) humans should
        not use absolute pitch, but some non-human conlangs do (though no
        example comes to my mind now).

        --
        ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
        http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
        "Bêsel asa Êm, a Êm atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Êmel." - SiM 1:1
      • Adam Walker
        ... absolute pitch, but rather melodic templates. The language is called Imthikorakar, and grammatical functions are distinguished by melody. Just as an
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 21, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          On Wed, Mar 21, 2012 at 9:59 AM, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...>wrote:

          > Hallo conlangers!
          >
          > On Wed, 21 Mar 2012 06:54:22 -0400 MorphemeAddict wrote:
          >
          > > Are there any languages or peoples that use or require absolute pitch?
          >
          > Likewise, conlangs meant to be spoken by (ordinary) humans should
          > not use absolute pitch, but some non-human conlangs do (though no
          > example comes to my mind now).
          >
          > I have a sketch, never really developed, which uses, well not *exactly*
          absolute pitch, but rather "melodic templates." The language is called
          Imthikorakar, and grammatical functions are distinguished by melody. Just
          as an example using nonce words and nonce templates:

          Kimthima spoken/sung with the template fa-mi-do-mi would be in subject
          case, but with re-re-do-so would be in dative.
          Fomorladen with template la-la-ti-re would be present tense, with
          ti-ti-do-re would be future.

          As I said, I never developed the idea, it's just sat back in adusty corner
          of my mind for a couple of decades.

          Adam
        • Padraic Brown
          ... Interesting indeed! This is very nearly how the railways in the World operate, essentially by means of a musical language. It was discovered way lang syne
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 21, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            --- On Wed, 3/21/12, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:

            > > > Are there any languages or peoples that use or require absolute
            > > > pitch?
            >
            > > Likewise, conlangs meant to be spoken by (ordinary) humans should
            > > not use absolute pitch, but some non-human conlangs do (though no
            > > example comes to my mind now).
            >
            > I have a sketch, never really developed, which uses,
            > well not *exactly*
            > absolute pitch, but rather "melodic templates."  The
            > language is called
            > Imthikorakar, and grammatical functions are
            > distinguished  by melody.  Just
            > as an example using nonce words and nonce templates:
            >
            > Kimthima spoken/sung with the template fa-mi-do-mi would be
            > in subject
            > case, but with re-re-do-so would be in dative.
            > Fomorladen with template la-la-ti-re would be present tense,
            > with ti-ti-do-re would be future.

            Interesting indeed! This is very nearly how the railways in the World
            operate, essentially by means of a musical language. It was discovered way
            lang syne that the huge golems that turn the drive wheels of the
            locomotives comprehend and react better when they hear chimes, rather than
            spoken commands or, obviously, written ones.

            From the conductor's perspective, all he has to do is pull on a lever when
            he wants the caravan to increase or decrease speed or any of half a dozen
            other basic things that involve making the thing go or stop. Down in the
            works, each of these commands is encoded upon largeish cylinders, much
            like you find in a music box, which do indeed actuate tuned metal tongues.
            Each homunculus is 'programmed' to understand and carry out an order made
            specifically for himself. So each one has to learn not only the commands
            but also various adjunct melodic themes, such as the one that names the
            particular golem that is to carry out the order, a "continue doing this"
            order, a "stop doing this" order and so forth.

            There's no 'grammar' as such -- no distinctions of tense or case or
            anything like that. It's largely boiled down to imperative mood and
            progressive aspect, maybe a momentary aspect as well.

            So the theme [4. rG | 2.(CEGc) :| 8. cGcE | cGcE :| 4. cEGC], consisting
            of a crotchet G and a minim Cmaj chord, alerts all homunculi to work
            together; the quavers on c G & E tell them to maintain a certain speed;
            the crotchets at the end tell them to continue until otherwise
            counterordered.

            > As I said, I never developed the idea, it's just sat back in
            > adusty corner of my mind for a couple of decades.

            Dangerous place for an Idea to sit for a couple decades, you know! Never
            can tell what they might get up to...

            Padraic

            > Adam
          • Dirk Elzinga
            This week in a comic I follow the subject is absolute pitch. Here s the first one in the series:
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 21, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              This week in a comic I follow the subject is absolute pitch. Here's the
              first one in the series:

              http://www.classicalmusicisboring.com/archive/2012/03/cmib00378.html

              On Wed, Mar 21, 2012 at 10:56 AM, Padraic Brown <elemtilas@...> wrote:

              > --- On Wed, 3/21/12, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:
              >
              > > > > Are there any languages or peoples that use or require absolute
              > > > > pitch?
              > >
              > > > Likewise, conlangs meant to be spoken by (ordinary) humans should
              > > > not use absolute pitch, but some non-human conlangs do (though no
              > > > example comes to my mind now).
              > >
              > > I have a sketch, never really developed, which uses,
              > > well not *exactly*
              > > absolute pitch, but rather "melodic templates." The
              > > language is called
              > > Imthikorakar, and grammatical functions are
              > > distinguished by melody. Just
              > > as an example using nonce words and nonce templates:
              > >
              > > Kimthima spoken/sung with the template fa-mi-do-mi would be
              > > in subject
              > > case, but with re-re-do-so would be in dative.
              > > Fomorladen with template la-la-ti-re would be present tense,
              > > with ti-ti-do-re would be future.
              >
              > Interesting indeed! This is very nearly how the railways in the World
              > operate, essentially by means of a musical language. It was discovered way
              > lang syne that the huge golems that turn the drive wheels of the
              > locomotives comprehend and react better when they hear chimes, rather than
              > spoken commands or, obviously, written ones.
              >
              > From the conductor's perspective, all he has to do is pull on a lever when
              > he wants the caravan to increase or decrease speed or any of half a dozen
              > other basic things that involve making the thing go or stop. Down in the
              > works, each of these commands is encoded upon largeish cylinders, much
              > like you find in a music box, which do indeed actuate tuned metal tongues.
              > Each homunculus is 'programmed' to understand and carry out an order made
              > specifically for himself. So each one has to learn not only the commands
              > but also various adjunct melodic themes, such as the one that names the
              > particular golem that is to carry out the order, a "continue doing this"
              > order, a "stop doing this" order and so forth.
              >
              > There's no 'grammar' as such -- no distinctions of tense or case or
              > anything like that. It's largely boiled down to imperative mood and
              > progressive aspect, maybe a momentary aspect as well.
              >
              > So the theme [4. rG | 2.(CEGc) :| 8. cGcE | cGcE :| 4. cEGC], consisting
              > of a crotchet G and a minim Cmaj chord, alerts all homunculi to work
              > together; the quavers on c G & E tell them to maintain a certain speed;
              > the crotchets at the end tell them to continue until otherwise
              > counterordered.
              >
              > > As I said, I never developed the idea, it's just sat back in
              > > adusty corner of my mind for a couple of decades.
              >
              > Dangerous place for an Idea to sit for a couple decades, you know! Never
              > can tell what they might get up to...
              >
              > Padraic
              >
              > > Adam
              >
            • Herman Miller
              ... Solresol? Well, even that could be spoken in different keys, if you have a long enough text to establish the tonic. So, probably not.
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 21, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                On 3/21/2012 6:54 AM, MorphemeAddict wrote:
                > Are there any languages or peoples that use or require absolute pitch?
                >
                > stevo

                Solresol? Well, even that could be spoken in different keys, if you have
                a long enough text to establish the tonic. So, probably not.
              • Shair A
                13:11-8. 2012/3/21 Herman Miller
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 30, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  13:11-8.

                  2012/3/21 Herman Miller <hmiller@...>

                  > On 3/21/2012 6:54 AM, MorphemeAddict wrote:
                  >
                  >> Are there any languages or peoples that use or require absolute pitch?
                  >>
                  >> stevo
                  >>
                  >
                  > Solresol? Well, even that could be spoken in different keys, if you have a
                  > long enough text to establish the tonic. So, probably not.
                  >
                • Shair A
                  Excuse me - I meant to say that my conlang, 13:11-8, has an absolute pitch system. 2012/3/30 Shair A
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 30, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Excuse me - I meant to say that my conlang, 13:11-8, has an absolute pitch
                    system.

                    2012/3/30 Shair A <aeetlrcreejl@...>

                    > 13:11-8.
                    >
                    >
                    > 2012/3/21 Herman Miller <hmiller@...>
                    >
                    >> On 3/21/2012 6:54 AM, MorphemeAddict wrote:
                    >>
                    >>> Are there any languages or peoples that use or require absolute pitch?
                    >>>
                    >>> stevo
                    >>>
                    >>
                    >> Solresol? Well, even that could be spoken in different keys, if you have
                    >> a long enough text to establish the tonic. So, probably not.
                    >>
                    >
                    >
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.