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Re: Tre-mang

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  • Peter Bleackley
    ... Doesn t Sally have a few recipes in Teonaht? And of course, there was the Primordial Soup Relay a couple of years ago. Pete
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 1, 2011
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      On 01/07/2011 16:04, Irina Rempt wrote:
      > On Friday 01 Jul 2011 16:00:32 Leland Kusmer wrote:
      >
      >> I've thought a bit about the cuisine of one of my cultures, but
      >> never gone so far as to create a recipe. Have any of you?
      >
      > http://www.valdyas.org/irina/valdyas/ilaini/examples/nutballs.html
      > (and I can do more)
      >

      Doesn't Sally have a few recipes in Teonaht?

      And of course, there was the Primordial Soup Relay a couple of years ago.

      Pete
    • Garth Wallace
      On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 7:00 AM, Leland Kusmer ... As much as I like food, I haven t done much with my concultures cuisines. I do know that the people who
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 1, 2011
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        On Fri, Jul 1, 2011 at 7:00 AM, Leland Kusmer
        <lelandpaul@...> wrote:
        > See here:
        >
        > http://tre-mang.com/
        >
        > "The Feasts of Tre-mang – Real Recipes from an Imagined Island"
        >
        > Nevermind his jokey not-really-conlanging – I've always thought that food
        > would be a great way to share one's conculture. I've thought a bit about the
        > cuisine of one of my cultures, but never gone so far as to create a recipe.
        > Have any of you? This book definitely makes me want to start putting
        > together a recipe-book of my own.
        >
        > Imagine how much fun a multi-concultural potluck would be!

        As much as I like food, I haven't done much with my concultures'
        cuisines. I do know that the people who speak Ekmar-Tenkar drink a
        hard liquor distilled from honey.
      • Padraic Brown
        ... Sounds yummy! They make a similar recipe in Teleranian culture; only thing is, they use a rather different kind of nut. Mind you, *that* sort of recipe is
        Message 3 of 13 , Jul 1, 2011
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          --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Irina Rempt <irina@...> wrote:

          > > I've thought a bit about
          > > the cuisine of one of my cultures, but never gone so
          > far as to create a
          > > recipe. Have any of you?
          >
          > http://www.valdyas.org/irina/valdyas/ilaini/examples/nutballs.html
          > (and I can do more)

          Sounds yummy!

          They make a similar recipe in Teleranian culture; only thing is, they use
          a rather different kind of nut.

          Mind you, *that* sort of recipe is generally saved for the mid-winter
          holy days. You don't just whip up Mithridatian Nutballs at midsummer!

          Padraic

          >    Irina
        • Jörg Rhiemeier
          Hallo conlangers! ... Oh yes. I haven t done anything like that so far. The cuisine of the British Elves is virtually unexplored. What I know is that it is
          Message 4 of 13 , Jul 1, 2011
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            Hallo conlangers!

            On Friday 01 July 2011 16:00:32, Leland Kusmer wrote:

            > See here:
            >
            > http://tre-mang.com/
            >
            > "The Feasts of Tre-mang – Real Recipes from an Imagined Island"
            >
            > Nevermind his jokey not-really-conlanging – I've always thought that food
            > would be a great way to share one's conculture. I've thought a bit about
            > the cuisine of one of my cultures, but never gone so far as to create a
            > recipe. Have any of you? This book definitely makes me want to start
            > putting together a recipe-book of my own.
            >
            > Imagine how much fun a multi-concultural potluck would be!

            Oh yes. I haven't done anything like that so far. The cuisine
            of the British Elves is virtually unexplored. What I know is
            that it is vegetarian (though not vegan) and of course based on
            what grows in the British Isles, and probably has little to do
            with the cuisine of the present-day British Isles.

            --
            ... brought to you by the Weeping Elf
            http://www.joerg-rhiemeier.de/Conlang/index.html
            "Bêsel asa Êm, a Êm atha cvanthal a cvanth atha Êmel." - SiM 1:1
          • Padraic Brown
            ... It certainly is! ... You really should give it a try! Even if you never cook it -- I d never think to cook half the Teleranian foods I ve come across --
            Message 5 of 13 , Jul 1, 2011
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              --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Leland Kusmer <lelandpaul@...> wrote:

              > I've always thought that food
              > would be a great way to share one's conculture.

              It certainly is!

              > I've thought a bit about the
              > cuisine of one of my cultures, but never gone so far as to
              > create a recipe.

              You really should give it a try! Even if you never cook it -- I'd never
              think to cook half the Teleranian foods I've come across -- it's still a
              good exercise in conculturing. And if you can translate the recipe into
              a conlang, so much the better!

              Several years ago, we had a whole long discussion on foods and recipes. I
              know Sally Caves and I came up with several, and some other folks did too.
              Some of the stuff actually sounded edible!

              > Have any of you? This book definitely makes me want to
              > start putting together a recipe-book of my own.
              >
              > Imagine how much fun a multi-concultural potluck would be!

              Sure! Well, Irina gave Valdyan nut balls, which do actually appear to be
              edible, so I'll give the Teleranian take on the dish:

              Take six class c testicles* (these will be about 4 to 5 inches long) &
              brine them overnight in a cool crock. Rinse. Poach in milk until cooked to
              desired state. Meanwhile, take walnuts or other nuts & mince q.s. to yield
              half cup per testicle. Take each of dried raisins, apples, mango & ginger
              & mince q.s. to yield quarter c. Stir fry minced nuts in a little buttered
              wine or mead & slowly add fruit mince & some bread crumb. Set aside & take
              the testicles out of the milk. Peel off the membrane and slice lengthwise.
              Drain the nut & fruit and form into a paste, adding bread crumb or butter
              as needed to hold shape. Scoop some meat from the testicles, forming a cup
              in each; overstuff with nut & fruit mixture and add spice to taste. Serve
              on a bed of greens & with hot goober sauce over rhubarb stalks. Serves xii.

              This fancy dish is served at the Metranes, a midwinter festival, in many
              parts of the country.

              *Although not specified in the recipe, it would be obvious, at least to a
              Teleranian cook, that only bull testicles should be used during this
              festival, as Mithras and bulls go together like peas and honey. Yum!

              > -Leland

              Padraic
            • Roger Mills
              Hilarious text!! Reminds me of something I wrote back in college.... The Tre-Mang custom of the shryng sounds a bit like something the Kash do :-))) ... I
              Message 6 of 13 , Jul 1, 2011
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                Hilarious text!! Reminds me of something I wrote back in college.... The Tre-Mang custom of the "shryng" sounds a bit like something the Kash do :-)))

                --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Adam Walker <carraxan@...> wrote:

                > I have a number of Carraxan recipes
                > on line and several more waiting for me
                > to find the time/energy to webify.  I cook Carraxan
                > food quite regularly.
                >

                I posted a Kash recipe (though it was actually Chinese) some time back, and it's on my website along with one or two others (also pseudo-Chinese).
              • Padraic Brown
                ... Ah, so no fishnchips or curry! I did a little reading about food in Britain, and it seems that most of the foods we d now consider to be native were in
                Message 7 of 13 , Jul 1, 2011
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                  --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...> wrote:

                  > I haven't done anything like that so far.  The cuisine
                  > of the British Elves is virtually unexplored.  What I
                  > know is
                  > that it is vegetarian (though not vegan) and of course
                  > based on
                  > what grows in the British Isles, and probably has little to
                  > do with the cuisine of the present-day British Isles.

                  Ah, so no fishnchips or curry!

                  I did a little reading about food in Britain, and it seems that most of
                  the foods we'd now consider to be native were in fact introduced by the
                  Romans -- hare, apples, cabbage, etc.

                  Truly native foods probably included things like fish, seaweeds, berries
                  and game (boar, etc.) But as I recall, the British Elves were fairly
                  advanced folk -- I could easily imagine them importing some of the fruits
                  and vegetables and herbs that *here* the Romans transplanted.

                  That would pretty much satisfy the vegetarian aspect of their diet. Throw
                  in some beans (if they can be grown in Britain), cheese and dairy for
                  protein and you've got a good basis.

                  Padraic
                • Wesley Parish
                  It s a certainty that seaweed was high on the list, and probably traded inland - a book I ve got on British cooking gives seaweed as one of the foodstuffs of
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jul 2, 2011
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                    It's a certainty that seaweed was high on the list, and probably
                    traded inland - a book I've got on British cooking gives seaweed as
                    one of the foodstuffs of Scotland, which makes me grin whenever I
                    drop by the local Sushi stall :) it's just that most English-speaking
                    people aren't aware of that little snippet of cuisine ...

                    Of course, Tolkien could've given us some hints as to what the Teleri
                    in Beleriand and Tol Eressea ate while they were becoming the Sea
                    Elves,but he appears not to have considered the implications thereof.
                    Pity that! :)

                    So far the only recipes I appear to have come up with for my
                    conculture are either Rakhebuityan or City, and they feature meat
                    stuffed with roots and wrapped in leaves - basically, a sizeable yam,
                    washed, wrapped in a thin slice of goat (for the purposes of this,
                    say lamb, or mutton) then a couple of leaves of the local equivalent
                    of the quinine tree - but long and thick and succulent - are wrapped
                    around the meat, which is then stuffed in a clay pot and buried in
                    the ashes of the hearth, and left to cook. You can smell when it's
                    ready to eat.

                    I've been told it's good to eat, quite tasty ... :)

                    FWLIW :)

                    Wesley Parish

                    On 2/07/2011, at 1:27 PM, Padraic Brown wrote:

                    > --- On Fri, 7/1/11, Jörg Rhiemeier <joerg_rhiemeier@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >> I haven't done anything like that so far. The cuisine
                    >> of the British Elves is virtually unexplored. What I
                    >> know is
                    >> that it is vegetarian (though not vegan) and of course
                    >> based on
                    >> what grows in the British Isles, and probably has little to
                    >> do with the cuisine of the present-day British Isles.
                    >
                    > Ah, so no fishnchips or curry!
                    >
                    > I did a little reading about food in Britain, and it seems that
                    > most of
                    > the foods we'd now consider to be native were in fact introduced by
                    > the
                    > Romans -- hare, apples, cabbage, etc.
                    >
                    > Truly native foods probably included things like fish, seaweeds,
                    > berries
                    > and game (boar, etc.) But as I recall, the British Elves were fairly
                    > advanced folk -- I could easily imagine them importing some of the
                    > fruits
                    > and vegetables and herbs that *here* the Romans transplanted.
                    >
                    > That would pretty much satisfy the vegetarian aspect of their diet.
                    > Throw
                    > in some beans (if they can be grown in Britain), cheese and dairy for
                    > protein and you've got a good basis.
                    >
                    > Padraic
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